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Burst Apart (Amazon Exclusive Version) [Explicit]

May 10, 2011 | Format: MP3

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3:26
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5:17
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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: May 10, 2011
  • Label: Frenchkiss Records
  • Copyright: (c) 2011 Frenchkiss Records
  • Total Length: 46:04
  • Genres:
  • Format: Explicit Lyrics
  • ASIN: B004WEIA4S
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (26 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #23,971 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
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See all 26 customer reviews
Each song tells a story of its own.
Michael
There will enevitably be more than a few who be disapointed with Burst Apart (you can't please everyone, right?), but I think most will enjoy it just a much Hospice.
Mark Abrahamsen
Beautiful vocals, powerful instrumentals and and melding that makes this album a pleasure to listen to time and time again.
David Yarber

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By mr. flux on June 28, 2011
Format: Audio CD
Many of the reviewers here and elsewhere begin by asking whether Burst Apart has met expectations after the brilliant Hospice. Many don't think so and the reasons seem fair enough. Hospice is a wonderful album with treasures throughout. Burst Apart is no doubt a departure. It has a gentler and, at least to my ears, more cohesive sound that at times evokes Radiohead's explorations of ambient electronic rock or Cocteau Twins' Treasure-era lushness. Burst Apart is perhaps less innovative than its predecessor as comparisons to Radiohead only confirm.

But I find it more enjoyable. This is an album that can be listened to more consistently than Hospice. At times Hospice sounded forced, jarring, even "arty", whereas Bust Apart is effortless and beautiful. It works equally well as background music and as intense-listening music. I realize many people care about Hospice a lot and that may be the problem here. If the release order of the albums were reversed I imagine that some would view the earlier Hospice as a misguided attempt at originality. Time will tell, but my guess is that, between the two, Burst Apart is the timeless one.
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Andrew Vice on May 10, 2011
Format: Audio CD
I don't envy the Antlers the position they are in to follow up 2009's landmark Hospice. Coming completely out of left field, Hospice was a brilliantly orchestrated album about the literal and figurative death of a relationship, chronicalling the abuse, the isolation, and the small glimmers of hope in between the sorrow. The risk of cliche in discussing follow-up Burst Apart is immense: "it isn't as good as Hospice," "it sounds like Radiohead," or "it's even better than Hospice." The reality for me is that two of these ring fairly true.

Burst Apart mines some of the same emotional space as Hospice, but it pushes past the pervasive sorrow of that album and trends into warmer waters. Opener "I Don't Want Love" is a lush, looping pop gem whose warm sounds bely the cold message. Elsewhere, living up to the Radiohead comparisons, "Parantheses" and "Every Night My Teeth Are Falling Out" work within some of that band's atonal pop universe, pairing chiming guitars with breathy falsetto for a sort of patented sound. Burst Apart is ten very solid songs with some strange pacing. The jump from "Parantheses" to "No Widows" is jarring and poorly conceived, given the flawless listing and pacing of Hospice.

All in all, Burst Apart is a very solid effort from a band struggling to live up to the massive hype generated by its breakout album, and it is largely successful at meeting the expectations of a hungry fanbase. Not every that loved Hospice will love this record, but many more that didn't dig Hospice all that hard should be heavy into Burst Apart.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By M. Buisman on July 19, 2011
Format: Audio CD
The Antlers' first connection with a larger audience, "Hospice" was a an album so haunting and moving that it has remained in high rotation on my iPod. A beautiful concept album about a dying cancer patient and the man who takes care of her made The Antlers a new name to be reckoned with, especially after some powerful live shows where they were able to get an entire crowd dead silent. One thing that came out of these shows and the news songs they played was that the new album could never be as dark as "Hospice". "Burst Apart" sounds at first listen less dark, but hasn't changed my perception of The Antlers in the least.
Ok, a title like `I Don't Want Love' doesn't particularly sound upbeat. Peter Silberman' falsetto voice is however much more clear and stretched and really shows the big steps they made into a much more professional band.
The keyboards are a little more 80ish and the drums slightly muffled but still the songs make you listen intensely so you cannot but get overwhelmed and get in a trance induced by the layers of keyboards, guitars and Silberman's hovering high voice. A good example of this is the dubby `Parantheses' or the hypnothic `Rolled Together'.
"Burst Apart" has less layers of sound than "Hospice", it has less to hide. The final two songs are for Antlers standards quite clear. The overall quality of the songs remains high but never reaches the heights of "Hospice". But this wasn't to be suspected and cannot be a blemish on the Antler's body of work, if anything they show they remain a quality indie band who will give us much more unique stuff.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Terry Ferrell on July 17, 2011
Format: Audio CD
Burst Apart, the fourth studio album from Brooklyn indie outfit The Antlers, is their first album since 2009's well received Hospice. Sonically, the album possesses a very nocturnal feel. Peter Silberman's soft, but high cooing conjures images of lonely animals calling out in the moonlight, while soft, swaying guitar riffs hypnotize the listener into a dreamlike lull. Even some of the song titles themselves invoke a night time setting; most obvious is the track "Every Night My Teeth Are Falling Out," which in dreams is symbolic of impotence.

While every song is delicious to the ears and stands well on its own, the album's strongest point is the "Parentheses"-"No Widows"-"Rolled Together" run (tracks 3, 4, and 5 respectively). With "Parentheses," the album takes a darker turn with a more pronounced electric guitar center. From here, the listener is taken into a 5+ minute drug-like state of circular beats and repetitive soft howling in "No Widows." Concluding this tri-song run is "Rolled Together," which combines Silberman's soft howls with layered vocals resembling a deserted beach campfire sing-a-along.

With its 11 tracks, the album clocks in at just under 42 minutes. So grab your MP3 player, your favorite ear buds, find a clear starry night, and be prepared to be transported.
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