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Bury Me Deep: A Novel Paperback – Bargain Price, July 7, 2009


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster; Original edition (July 7, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1416599096
  • ASIN: B003E7EU0C
  • Product Dimensions: 8.2 x 5.5 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (20 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,070,298 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Edgar-winner Abbott (Queenpin) explores gender inequality and its sometimes tragic results in her well-crafted fourth crime novel, inspired by the true story of Winnie Ruth Judd (aka the Trunk Murderess). In 1931, Marion Seeley, a young woman whose husband has gone abroad on undisclosed business, secures a clerical job at the Werden Clinic in the capital of an unnamed Midwest state. From a veteran nurse, Louise Mercer, Marion learns that doctors have been misbehaving with the clinic's nursing staff. Marion becomes involved with Joe Lanigan, a close friend of the doctors and a reliable source of entertainment and money for the often cash-strapped nurses. When Louise and Ginny Hoyt, Louise's roommate, confront Marion about her relationship to Joe, the women get into a heated argument that leads to murder and a startling predicament for Marion. Readers should be prepared for a lot of backstory before the pace picks up and hurtles to a shocking ending. (July)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Review

"Word for word, pound for pound, Megan Abbott delivers more than any writer I know. Her influences appear to range from Hollywood Babylon to Theodore Dreiser, but her work transcends pastiche and homage. Bury Me Deep extends an already jaw-dropping winning streak, showcasing Abbott's gorgeous prose and clear-eyed empathy. She is simply one of the most exciting and original voices of her generation." -- Laura Lippman, New York Times bestselling author of What the Dead Know

"Working once more...from a true crime... Edgar-winner Abbott brings the era to life...Her nearly stream-of-consciousness narration is direct and powerful...her prose carries an urgency that brings hard-boiled crime fiction kicking and screaming into the modern age. Abbott takes readers on a wild thrill ride with an utterly believable and strangely sympathetic heroine." -- Kirkus, Starred Review

"In [Bury Me Deep] Abbott turns the stuff of sensational confession magazines into a rich meditation on the unclouded depths of the soul." -- Carl Rosen, New York magazine

"[F]abulous characters, delectable plotting, a unique story and a steamy yet gossamer setting....A stunning work of fiction, it is Abbott's love for her central character that makes Bury Me Deep so accessible and so far away at the same time. Imagine Hammett wrote Daisy Buchanan and not Fitzgerald. And you are Gatsby... so close and yet so far away. This is Bury Me Deep." -- Ruth Jordan, Crimespree

"Edgar-winner Abbott...explores gender inequality and its sometimes tragic results in her well-crafted fourth crime novel...that leads to murder and a startling predicament...Readers should be prepared for...a shocking ending." -- Publishers Weekly

"[S]omething for everyone: true crime (it's based on a notorious 1930s trunk murderess' case), plus it's a women's story with noir embellishments. It has tough times, drugs, and pandemics. It screams 'today!' -- only retro. Done in that rat-a-tat delivery that...can't miss. Recommended heartily for fans of Edgar Award-winning Abbott's retro-noir crime fiction." -- Library Journal

"In a word: amazing. In more words: Megan Abbott, who has never delivered anything less than an excellent novel, exceeds expectations and takes a very bold and very necessary step forward both in the quality of the prose, the development of her characters and especially in portraying how obsession seeps into the very soul of people, transforming them into their worst nightmares all too easily. Just read this book. And then tell many others to do so as well." -- Confessions of an Idiosyncratic Mind

"Megan Abbott's virtuoso fiction [is comparable] to the great James M. Cain....Bury Me Deep is literary fiction that happens to include a crime...beautifully wrought...[Abbott is] an author destined to be a leading writer of her generation." -- W.E. Reinka, Mystery News, FIVE STARS

"[A] cunningly fictionalized...exquisite book, told in delicate, shimmering prose that heightens the nightmarish quality of the story. Megan Abbott is often compared with James Ellroy...but her writing is far more economical and focused, and her sensibilities are feminine to the core. This is noir mystery writing at its very best." -- Tom and Enid Schantz, The Denver Post

More About the Author

MEGAN ABBOTT is the Edgar award-winning author of six novels, including Dare Me, The End of Everything and Bury Me Deep. Her writing has appeared in Detroit Noir, Queens Noir, Phoenix Noir, New York Times and Los Angeles Times Magazine. She is the author of The Street Was Mine: White Masculinity in Hardboiled Fiction and Film Noir and editor of A Hell of a Woman, a female crime fiction anthology. She has been nominated for awards including the Steel Dagger, the LA Times Book Prize and the Pushcart Prize. Currently, she is working on the screenplay for her novel, Dare Me, soon to be a major motion picture.

Born in the Detroit area, she graduated from the University of Michigan with a B.A. in English Literature and went on to receive her Ph.D. in English and American literature from New York University. She lives in Queens, New York City.

Customer Reviews

If you are a fan of the genre, you will want to read this worthy fourth Megan Abbott novel.
Edie
I also appreciate the information about how the author came to her subject and the background about the true story that inspired this book.
NaoNao
Megan Abbott writes dark crime novels that read like feminist versions of Chandler and Ellroy and this one is no exception.
Ridgeway Girl

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Mercedes J. TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on July 24, 2009
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I have read both Ms. Abbott's previous Noir's, 'Die a Little' (which is my absolute favorite), and 'The Song Is You' (also very, very good). I had high hopes for this book, but was somewhat disappointed upon starting it. The first 30% of the story seemed rushed and disjointed. I didn't feel as though I was getting to know the characters, and people and places jumped around so much it was hard to keep things straight. I almost gave up on it. I'm so glad I didn't.

This story is based loosely on the real life crime tale of Winnie Ruth Judd (a.k.a. The Trunk Murderess) in the 1930's. However, don't think you can just head on over to Wikipedia, read the story of Winnie Ruth, and think you have Ms. Abbott's novel all figured out (I made this mistake, but it made the ending all the more enjoyable). Ms. Abbott has altered the actual events into a 'What would have happened if...' , and it makes for a riveting story. Marion Seeley does not meet the same fate as her real life counterpart, and some key players involved in the crime and Marion's life, have a very different ending to their stories as well.

While the beginning of this novel frustrated me, the rest more then made up for it. Overall, I absolutely recommend this. I am not a regular fan of dark novels filled with sex, drugs and murder, but Megan Abbott is one of the ONLY authors of this genre that I always keep an eye out for. While her style of writing may take a little getting used to, she has a way of pulling you right into the seedy side of a long-past era of glitz and glamour.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By P. Johnson on October 24, 2009
Format: Paperback
In the last six months I have been trying to read all of the GREAT hard-boiled/noir writers. Megan Abbott was a wonderful discovery, and her two novels "The Song is You" and "Die a Little" were both fantastic reads. Five Stars, read these two books, you will love them.

I had similar expectations for "Bury Me Deep", but found that it Bored Me Deeply. Others have stated that the first third of the book is back story; I would say that more than half of the book is back story. The narrative reads like a teenage romance novel in which a young girl breathlessly telling us about her first love.

Between the 100+ page set-up, the annoying "breathless" style, and a disappointing ending, I cannot recommend the book. Megan Abbott's previous writing was better than this book-- much, much better. Sorry Megan; your other books were gripping page-turners. In this book, I just did not like your main character Marion.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By J. Langolf on August 5, 2009
Format: Paperback
but sometimes fiction fills the gaps that truth leaves behind.

Not just another one of those tawdry tales of victims and vice, filled with complex characters and more shades of gray than all the dark hours before dawn. A thread of lurid truth, expertly woven absolutely gives this absorbing novel its feeling of authenticity. Painstaking research and darkly poetic language make this a touching and tragic story that I simply could not put down. Megan Abbott is absolutely one of my favorite finds of the last few years and she certainly scores again with Bury Me Deep.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Edie VINE VOICE on September 12, 2009
Format: Paperback
Marion Seeley's husband abandons her in Phoenix, Arizona while he takes a job at a mining company in Mexico because he lost his medical license due to drug use.

Marion begins working as a secretary in a TB clinic, and is soon befriended by Louise Mercer, one of the nurses at the clinic. To supplement their income, Louise and her roommate Ginny hold gin-soaked thrill parties at their apartment for the wealthy and powerful men of the city.

Bury Me Deep is loosely based on a real-life crime that took place in October 1931. A Los Angeles stationmaster found two large abandoned steamer trunks with a dismembered body in each. The sensational case became known as "The Trunk Murderess" and the perpetrator, Winnie Ruth Judd, was convicted and sent to prison for killing her two friends in what appeared to be an open and shut case. Unfortunately, the truth was much more complicated.

Author Megan Abbott writes in a third person noir style popular during the 1930s and 40s. She successfully draws the reader deep into every scene. She handles with honesty and realism the transformation Marion undergoes as an innocent young woman looking in at a seemingly fascinating lifestyle, then becoming a major player in the degradation that overtakes her life.

This novel is as deeply unsettling as it is rich in the darkness of the times. Abbott writes with perfect pitch detailing the dark world in which the men and women lived and loved. She brings hard-boiled crime fiction to the forefront with stellar dialogue and strong characterization. It's no wonder she is often compared to noir master Raymond Chandler.

If you are a fan of the genre, you will want to read this worthy fourth Megan Abbott novel.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By NaoNao on October 14, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Megan Abbott has a hypnotic, almost disturbing style that is not for everyone, but is extremely enjoyable for those who like noir. It's great to see female voices in this genre, and even though recently Abbott has moved to writing contemporary work, her noirs are terrific. Eerie, sad, scary, eloquent, unique, narcotic, and sexy....great reads. I also appreciate the information about how the author came to her subject and the background about the true story that inspired this book.
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