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Business and the Buddha: Doing Well by Doing Good Paperback


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Wisdom Publications (November 28, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0861715446
  • ISBN-13: 978-0861715442
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6.3 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #272,748 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Lloyd Field, PhD, left his position as a corporate Vice President of Human Resources at Johnson and Johnson International to build a new career in Organizational Development and Human Resource consultancy. His clients have included many Fortune 500 organizations and his management development and training audiences have include more than 20,000 managers in North America, Europe, and Asia. His current focus is on helping senior executives solve business problems through Buddhist-influenced coaching and counseling. A classic connector in the Malcolm Gladwell sense of the word Lloyd has sold over 10,000 copies (in Canada) of his previous book on positive employee relations-that book is soon to be in its fifth edition. Lloyd has been interviewed on TV (CTV, City TV) and radio (CBC Radio: As It Happens) on numerous occasions. He is currently on the founding committee of Sarvodaya Canada, an organization committed to promoting community development. As well, Lloyd is the former President of the Board of Nalanda College of Buddhist Studies.

Master Hsing Yun is the founder of Fo Guang Shan-an international Buddhist order with temples worldwide-the affiliated Buddha's Light International, and University of the West in Rosemead, California. Born in 1927, he is a forty-eighth patriarch of the Lin Chi (Rinzai) School of Zen Buddhism and lives in Taiwan.

Tenzin Gyatso, the Fourteenth Dalai Lama, is the spiritual leader of the Tibetan people. He frequently describes himself as a simple Buddhist monk. Born in northeastern Tibet in 1935, he was as a toddler recognized as the incarnation of the Thirteenth Dalai Lama and brought to Tibet's capital, Lhasa. In 1950, Mao Zedong's Communist forces made their first incursions into eastern Tibet, shortly after which the young Dalai Lama assumed the political leadership of his country. He passed his scholastic examinations with honors at the Great Prayer Festival in Lhasa in 1959, the same year Chinese forces occupied the city, forcing His Holiness to escape to India. There he set up the Tibetan government-in-exile in Dharamsala, working to secure the welfare of the more than 100,000 Tibetan exiles and prevent the destruction of Tibetan culture. In his capacity as a spiritual and political leader, he has traveled to more than sixty-two countries on six continents and met with presidents, popes, and leading scientists to foster dialogue and create a better world. In recognition of his tireless work for the nonviolent liberation of Tibet, the Dalai Lama was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1989. In 2012, he relinquished political authority in his exile government and turned it over to democratically elected representatives.

His Holiness frequently states that his life is guided by three major commitments: the promotion of basic human values or secular ethics in the interest of human happiness, the fostering of interreligious harmony, and securing the welfare of the Tibetan people, focusing on the survival of their identity, culture, and religion. As a superior scholar trained in the classical texts of the Nalanda tradition of Indian Buddhism, he is able to distill the central tenets of Buddhist philosophy in clear and inspiring language, his gift for pedagogy imbued with his infectious joy. Connecting scientists with Buddhist scholars, he helps unite contemplative and modern modes of investigation, bringing ancient tools and insights to bear on the acute problems facing the contemporary world. His efforts to foster dialogue among leaders of the world's faiths envision a future where people of different beliefs can share the planet in harmony. Wisdom Publications is proud to be the premier publisher of the Dalai Lama's more serious and in-depth works.

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Michael P. Maslanka on December 15, 2007
Format: Paperback
This is a brave and insightful book. Field looks at what few do: how Buddhist thoughts can apply to business. He looks at the power of intention( a mission statement should include an intention to refrain from harm); how karma applies to the practice of business( unduly harm your competitor today and reap your own harm down the line); unions are a business themselves and a mirror image of corporations( they must reform themselves before lashing out at Corporate America). Change is very hard but as Gandhi told us, be the change you want to see. A worthwhile book, deserving of a wide audience.
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By BodhiReader on January 22, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Business and the Buddha is a utopian call to reform capitalism with holistic values informed by Buddhist philosophy. In the book Dr Field criticizes capitalism for its lack of values and emphasis on bottom-line for profit motives, the result of which is a net harm to the overall welfare of sentient beings. Dr Field wants to show us how Buddhism can inform us on how to create a more holistic capitalism while preserving the economic system.

The book is well intended but without a complete economic upheaval the idea that a company should take on this kind of reformation is fiscal suicide. Dr Field wants corporations to take responsibility for their externalities (which they should) but the moment one corporation decides to take on their affects on the world the rest of the market will immediately have an advantage over that corporation simply because they're not throwing money at problems that aren't going to make them money. Long story short, this will end in market loss for the responsible company.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Paxton S. Henry on November 27, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Great book. Although assigned as a textbook for a course, I would read it in my spare time for self development and inspiration.
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0 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Jason Plastow on March 23, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Bought this book for a Business Morals class for reference for papers. This book proved to be worthless. I don't know if it's Buddhism or the author, but not a concrete example to help me in any of my papers. Nothing is concrete or tangible. It's all esoteric and vague.
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