Business Model Generation and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy New
$22.44
Qty:1
  • List Price: $34.95
  • Save: $12.51 (36%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Sell yours for a Gift Card
We'll buy it for $5.67
Learn More
Trade in now
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 3 images

Business Model Generation: A Handbook for Visionaries, Game Changers, and Challengers Paperback – July 13, 2010


See all 10 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$22.44
$12.48 $12.89
Best%20Books%20of%202014


Frequently Bought Together

Business Model Generation: A Handbook for Visionaries, Game Changers, and Challengers + Value Proposition Design: How to Create Products and Services Customers Want (Strategyzer) + The Lean Startup: How Today's Entrepreneurs Use Continuous Innovation to Create Radically Successful Businesses
Price for all three: $57.02

Buy the selected items together
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Are You an Entrepreneurial Spirit?
Find out if you have what it takes to drive innovation in your business [PDF].

Product Details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: John Wiley and Sons; 1st edition (July 13, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0470876417
  • ISBN-13: 978-0470876411
  • Product Dimensions: 7.5 x 0.8 x 9.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (459 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,975 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Business Model Generation is a handbook for visionaries, game changers, and challengers striving to defy outmoded business models and design tomorrow's enterprises. If your organization needs to adapt to harsh new realities, but you don't yet have a strategy that will get you out in front of your competitors, you need Business Model Generation.

Co-created by 470 "Business Model Canvas" practitioners from 45 countries, the book features a beautiful, highly visual, 4-color design that takes powerful strategic ideas and tools, and makes them easy to implement in your organization. It explains the most common Business Model patterns, based on concepts from leading business thinkers, and helps you reinterpret them for your own context. You will learn how to systematically understand, design, and implement a game-changing business model--or analyze and renovate an old one. Along the way, you'll understand at a much deeper level your customers, distribution channels, partners, revenue streams, costs, and your core value proposition.

Business Model Generation features practical innovation techniques used today by leading consultants and companies worldwide, including 3M, Ericsson, Capgemini, Deloitte, and others. Designed for doers, it is for those ready to abandon outmoded thinking and embrace new models of value creation: for executives, consultants, entrepreneurs, and leaders of all organizations. If you're ready to change the rules, you belong to "the business model generation!"

The Power of “What If” Questions
Content from authors Alexander Osterwalder and Yves Pigneur

We often have trouble conceiving innovative business models because we are held back in our thinking by status quo. The status quo stifles imagination. One way to overcome this problem is to challenge conventional assumptions with “what if” questions. With the right business model ingredients, what we think of as impossible might just be doable. “What if” questions help us break free of constraints imposed by current business models. They should provoke us and challenge our thinking. They should disturb us as intriguing, difficult-to-execute propositions.

What if...
…furniture buyers picked up components in flat pack form from a large warehouse and assembled the products themselves in their homes? What is common practice today was unthinkable until IKEA introduced the concept in the 1960’s.

…airlines didn’t buy engines for their airplanes, but paid for every hour an engine runs? That is how Rolls-Royce transformed itself from a money-losing British manufacturer into a service firm that today is the world’s second biggest provider of large jet engines.

…voice calls were free worldwide? In 2003 Skype launched a service that allowed free voice calling via the internet. After five years, Skype had acquired 400 million registered users who collectively had made 100 billion free phone calls.

Review

an impressively comprehensive compendium of many of the most current ideas concerning the structure and development of businesses.' (Anglohigher.com, May 2011).

... this handbook is likely to prove an excellent help for evaluating business models . (Anatello.com, July 2011).


More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

A very good book, easy reading and very clear.
Sebastian Feldman
This book not only helps with business plans and models but for a graphic designer is a great example of pragmatic visual presentation - very well done.
Opus22
I loved the book and recommend it to any entrepreneur, business owner, or manager.
jerry hare

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

190 of 199 people found the following review helpful By M. Hyman VINE VOICE on September 9, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is very different as a business book. Instead of being filled with dense, usually overly wordy pages, it is beautifully laid out, the wording is kept to a minimum, and there are lots of illustrations.

The book is focused on ways to think of the model for your business... with some nice guidelines for structuring the thought process... as well as a bunch of examinations of different types of businesses.

It has good discussions on thinking through what is critical for the business, where the cost structures are, where the benefits are, and how to organize and present those ideas.

It also has a number of cases studies of various companies that changed or invented new business models, such as Amazon's introduction of Web Services.

The book is fast to read, and there were several sections I bookmarked to put into use in my company, which to me is always a good sign for a book.

Where the book is lacking is that I would really have liked more case studies -- a bit more meat so to speak -- once a company came up with the new model, how did the artifacts of the book's discussions come into play with the execution? Did any of the techniques discussed help with the inevitable pitfalls associated? What are some case studies for when people tried the techniques discussed and failed miserably? Innovator's Dilemma, by comparison, does a much better look at both positive and negative case studies, which can provide a lot more learning.

I also would have liked more depth on the blue ocean discussion.

Altogether though, an interesting read and a good addition to my management book shelf.
6 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
106 of 112 people found the following review helpful By Ken Rider on November 21, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
"Business Model Generation" is a breezy read and a well-organized introduction to several related topics including: basic types of business models, techniques and strategies for generating ideas and thinking creatively about them, along with process steps for moving good ideas forward. But the promising title makes it sound like this is a more substantive resource than it really is.

PROS: Anyone new to these topics would likely have to read four to six separate books to get the broad coverage you'll find here. The authors have done a service for folks who want to come up to speed more quickly. I felt that I came away with some useful info in most of the chapters and each has additional references for further reading. The designers also deserve some credit for a creative and varied layout that makes the text seem fresher. Plus, you can feel good about yourself as you plow through 50+ pages in half an hour without fatigue. The bonus: this is a business book that won't have you drowning in business jargon.

CONS: As several reviewers have noted, there's breadth here but not much depth on the core topics. Those expecting more may be disappointed and some may find the book's suggestive title misleading. Probably more accurate if they called it "A *PRIMER* for Business Model Generation" instead of a Handbook. It's a place to get started, not a definitive resource as the term handbook implies. Finally, the small font sizes that a few reviewers mentioned will surely be difficult to read for those with less-than-great eyesight.
4 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
151 of 163 people found the following review helpful By Michael Uschold on December 14, 2009
Format: Unknown Binding
This is an absolutely superb book and my first and only book on business models. It is so up to date and filled with gems that I feel no need to read another anytime soon.

The book is aptly titled, being all about how to generate business models. However, you have to know what it is before you can generate it. To this end, the first section of the book is devoted to introducing a standard language and format for talking about business models. They introduce nine key items which serve as the building blocks for all business models. These are listed below, illustrated with Skype's business model.

CUSTOMER SEGMENTS: Who will use the product?
1) web users globally 2) people who want to call phones

VALUE PROPOSITION: Why will they use the product?
1) free Internet and video calling 2) cheap calls to phones (SkypeOut)

CHANNELS: How will the product be delivered to the customers?
[...] and headset partnerships

CUSTOMER RELATIONSHIPS: how will you develop and maintain contact with your customers in each segment?
Mass customizedMass customized

REVENUE STREAMS: How is revenue generated from which customer segments?
1) Free 2) SkypeOut prepaid or subscription

ACTIVITIES: What are the key things that you need to do to create and deliver the product?
Software development

RESOURCES: What assets are required to create and deliver the product?

PARTNERS: Who will you want to partner with (e.g suppliers, outsourcing)
Payment providers, Distribution partners, Telco Partners

COST STRUCTURE: What are the main sources of cost required to create and deliver the product?
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
77 of 85 people found the following review helpful By Brian Egras on September 20, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I purchased this book to refine what I know about business models, which always seemed like an ill-defined concept when found in popular writings and even through my business school experience. I wanted to know about the fundamentals of a business model and its creation as well as providing sound examples of business model structures along with the underpinnings of when they work and why. This book seemed perfect for my undertaking but falls short of an essential book on the subject, coming off merely as an overview with some random unrelated business topics thrown in for good measure.

One problem that proliferates throughout the book is in how it categorizes components when dissecting model elements. Their categories are time and again overlapping and incomplete - thus appearing arbitrary. For example, when detailing the different types of revenue streams, the following categories are given as distinct and complete: Asset Sale, Usage Fee, Subscription Fee, Lending/Renting/Leasing, Licensing, Brokerage Fees, and, Advertising. How would you categorize the hotel business? The authors put this under Usage Fee. Why? It seems a lot like Renting to me. How about Gillette's razor blade model? The authors talk about it later in the book (termed the Bait-And-Hook model), but do not categorize this type of revenue stream here. Odd. But the overarching problem is that the categorization throughout the book is consistently arbitrary, and reminds me of Michael Scott from The Office proclaiming, "There are four kinds of businesses: tourism, food service, rail roads, and sales, ... and hospitals/manufacturing, ... and air travel".
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews