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Business Model Generation: A Handbook for Visionaries, Game Changers, and Challengers (deluxe version) Unknown Binding – September 1, 2009


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Product Details

  • Unknown Binding: 288 pages
  • Publisher: OSF; 1st edition (September 1, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: 2839905809
  • Product Dimensions: 9.5 x 7.5 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (354 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #998,778 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

A very interesting and easy to read book.
Maha Al Mansouri
This book not only helps with business plans and models but for a graphic designer is a great example of pragmatic visual presentation - very well done.
Opus22
The book is aptly titled, being all about how to generate business models.
Michael Uschold

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

169 of 177 people found the following review helpful By M. Hyman VINE VOICE on September 9, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is very different as a business book. Instead of being filled with dense, usually overly wordy pages, it is beautifully laid out, the wording is kept to a minimum, and there are lots of illustrations.

The book is focused on ways to think of the model for your business... with some nice guidelines for structuring the thought process... as well as a bunch of examinations of different types of businesses.

It has good discussions on thinking through what is critical for the business, where the cost structures are, where the benefits are, and how to organize and present those ideas.

It also has a number of cases studies of various companies that changed or invented new business models, such as Amazon's introduction of Web Services.

The book is fast to read, and there were several sections I bookmarked to put into use in my company, which to me is always a good sign for a book.

Where the book is lacking is that I would really have liked more case studies -- a bit more meat so to speak -- once a company came up with the new model, how did the artifacts of the book's discussions come into play with the execution? Did any of the techniques discussed help with the inevitable pitfalls associated? What are some case studies for when people tried the techniques discussed and failed miserably? Innovator's Dilemma, by comparison, does a much better look at both positive and negative case studies, which can provide a lot more learning.

I also would have liked more depth on the blue ocean discussion.

Altogether though, an interesting read and a good addition to my management book shelf.
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88 of 92 people found the following review helpful By Ken Rider on November 21, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
"Business Model Generation" is a breezy read and a well-organized introduction to several related topics including: basic types of business models, techniques and strategies for generating ideas and thinking creatively about them, along with process steps for moving good ideas forward. But the promising title makes it sound like this is a more substantive resource than it really is.

PROS: Anyone new to these topics would likely have to read four to six separate books to get the broad coverage you'll find here. The authors have done a service for folks who want to come up to speed more quickly. I felt that I came away with some useful info in most of the chapters and each has additional references for further reading. The designers also deserve some credit for a creative and varied layout that makes the text seem fresher. Plus, you can feel good about yourself as you plow through 50+ pages in half an hour without fatigue. The bonus: this is a business book that won't have you drowning in business jargon.

CONS: As several reviewers have noted, there's breadth here but not much depth on the core topics. Those expecting more may be disappointed and some may find the book's suggestive title misleading. Probably more accurate if they called it "A *PRIMER* for Business Model Generation" instead of a Handbook. It's a place to get started, not a definitive resource as the term handbook implies. Finally, the small font sizes that a few reviewers mentioned will surely be difficult to read for those with less-than-great eyesight.
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141 of 152 people found the following review helpful By Michael Uschold on December 14, 2009
Format: Unknown Binding
This is an absolutely superb book and my first and only book on business models. It is so up to date and filled with gems that I feel no need to read another anytime soon.

The book is aptly titled, being all about how to generate business models. However, you have to know what it is before you can generate it. To this end, the first section of the book is devoted to introducing a standard language and format for talking about business models. They introduce nine key items which serve as the building blocks for all business models. These are listed below, illustrated with Skype's business model.

CUSTOMER SEGMENTS: Who will use the product?
1) web users globally 2) people who want to call phones

VALUE PROPOSITION: Why will they use the product?
1) free Internet and video calling 2) cheap calls to phones (SkypeOut)

CHANNELS: How will the product be delivered to the customers?
[...] and headset partnerships

CUSTOMER RELATIONSHIPS: how will you develop and maintain contact with your customers in each segment?
Mass customizedMass customized

REVENUE STREAMS: How is revenue generated from which customer segments?
1) Free 2) SkypeOut prepaid or subscription

ACTIVITIES: What are the key things that you need to do to create and deliver the product?
Software development

RESOURCES: What assets are required to create and deliver the product?

PARTNERS: Who will you want to partner with (e.g suppliers, outsourcing)
Payment providers, Distribution partners, Telco Partners

COST STRUCTURE: What are the main sources of cost required to create and deliver the product?
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58 of 63 people found the following review helpful By Brian Egras on September 20, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I purchased this book to refine what I know about business models, which always seemed like an ill-defined concept when found in popular writings and even through my business school experience. I wanted to know about the fundamentals of a business model and its creation as well as providing sound examples of business model structures along with the underpinnings of when they work and why. This book seemed perfect for my undertaking but falls short of an essential book on the subject, coming off merely as an overview with some random unrelated business topics thrown in for good measure.

One problem that proliferates throughout the book is in how it categorizes components when dissecting model elements. Their categories are time and again overlapping and incomplete - thus appearing arbitrary. For example, when detailing the different types of revenue streams, the following categories are given as distinct and complete: Asset Sale, Usage Fee, Subscription Fee, Lending/Renting/Leasing, Licensing, Brokerage Fees, and, Advertising. How would you categorize the hotel business? The authors put this under Usage Fee. Why? It seems a lot like Renting to me. How about Gillette's razor blade model? The authors talk about it later in the book (termed the Bait-And-Hook model), but do not categorize this type of revenue stream here. Odd. But the overarching problem is that the categorization throughout the book is consistently arbitrary, and reminds me of Michael Scott from The Office proclaiming, "There are four kinds of businesses: tourism, food service, rail roads, and sales, ... and hospitals/manufacturing, ... and air travel".
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