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72 of 72 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Completely Satisfying
Based on a stage play co-written by Sayers, Busman's Holiday is Sayers last significant statement in the mystery genre--and a completely satisfying one at that. Like several other novels that involve both Sayers' sleuth Lord Peter Wimsey and mystery novelist Harriet Vane, the novel is as much a portrait of their relationship as it is a murder mystery, and while these two...
Published on November 27, 2001 by Gary F. Taylor

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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Errors in a classic
This book is an old friend - I have it on my shelves and wanted to take it on holiday with me, which means Kindle. However, I am really disappointed with the number of errata in this edition - someone did a really lousy job of proof-reading.
Published on June 28, 2012 by Amazon Customer


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72 of 72 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Completely Satisfying, November 27, 2001
This review is from: Busman's Honeymoon (Mass Market Paperback)
Based on a stage play co-written by Sayers, Busman's Holiday is Sayers last significant statement in the mystery genre--and a completely satisfying one at that. Like several other novels that involve both Sayers' sleuth Lord Peter Wimsey and mystery novelist Harriet Vane, the novel is as much a portrait of their relationship as it is a murder mystery, and while these two elements occasionally seem at odds in other works (most notably the unworthy Have His Carcass), Busman's Holiday strikes a perfect balance between the two as we follow the couple through the first few days of their honeymoon as they deal with the shock of marriage, domestic disasters, and an unexpected body in their honeymoon home's basement. As in other novels, Sayers draws a great deal from her setting--in this case rural England on the eve of World War II--and presents us with a memorable cast of supporting characters, and the result is as fine a novel as she ever produced, particularly notable for its wittiness and sly humor. A greatly satisfying finish to a highly enjoyable series.
There is, incidently, an extremely well-made 1930s film version of this particular work starring Robert Montgomery and Constance Cummings. Although Montgomery is not quite the image of Lord Peter Wimsey, he plays quite well, and Cummings is Harriet Vane brought to life on the screen. Sayers fans should enjoy the film almost as much as they enjoy the book!
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38 of 39 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Vintage Sayers., December 7, 2002
By A Customer
This review is from: Busman's Honeymoon (Mass Market Paperback)
I am glad to find so many favorable reviews of this, Dorothy L Sayers' final detective fiction novel, on the internet. It failed to find much favor with the public or the critics when it was written in the late 1930s. In actual need of the income that her earlier works in this genre had generated (she had to support not only herself but also a non-productive husband and an illegitimate son), she negotiated with her publisher to "once again try my hand at detective fiction" after he had pointed out that the market seemed to have become saturated.
Just as a busman's holiday is a vacation where the busman is likely to be as involved with driving as he is throughout the rest of the year, a busman's honeymoon (a phrase which she coined) is one where the busman (in this case Lord Peter Wimsey) is likely to spend his honeymoon checking alibis, interviewing murder suspects, observing rigor mortis, and all the other tiresome activities of an amateur detective.
Lord Peter and Harriet Vane are the honeymooners. After their wedding (reported in a series of letters that begin the novel), they travel to "Talboys", a country house chosen by Harriet. Their reception is not as predicted. Eventually Lord Peter's butler, Bunter, discovers a corpse in the cellar.
The novel began life as a play, as you may infer from the many static scenes involving a large ensemble of characters entering and exiting. The prose is as rich in wit, classical illusions and sophistication as you will ever encounter in detective fiction. Dorothy L. Sayers was an honours graduate and capable of writing as well as George Eliot.
Don't expect the kind of fast food satisfaction that Agatha Christie provided so successfully. You will find instead the full silver service dining and wining experience here.
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30 of 30 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the best of its genre. . ., April 30, 2001
By 
"airi2" (Bryn Mawr, PA United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Busman's Honeymoon (Mass Market Paperback)
. . .although whether the genre should properly be romance or mystery is a point up for debate. Either way, this final book in the 4-novel Harriet Vane/Peter Wimsey series is wonderful and utterly satisfying. Not only is the murder mystery extremely tight and well-done (as per normal for Sayers), but this is one of the few books of any genre I've read that really gets love right. The problems and beauties of newlywed life for two people who've been trying to come to terms with their relationship for five years are very well done, and Sayers maintains her commitment as an author to be as utterly honest and realistic about love and its complications as possible.
Oh, and the roughly 6,000 tons of unresolved romantic tension built up through the first three Wimsey/Vane books are finally resolved here, to the great relief of the reader. Just reading accounts of the wedding (which was described through a series of letters between various friends and acquaintances of the couple), I felt as if I'd finally been allowed to breathe after having my head held underwater for an interminable period of time.
I plan to keep my copy of this book for the rest of my life--if you like mysteries and enjoy a good love story, this is a safe pick.
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17 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Read this one last, August 12, 2000
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This review is from: Busman's Honeymoon (Mass Market Paperback)
This book is one of the most enjoyable mysteries ever written, but it has to be approached in the right way. First you must read Strong Poison, then Have His Carcase, then Gaudy Night. When you have finished the first three, you are ready for a reading experience that will delight any lover of good literature. Dorothy Sayers and Agatha Christie may not have liked each other very much, but I am in love with both of them. They knew how to WRITE!
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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A romance with detective interruptions, April 30, 2004
By 
Jeanne Tassotto (Trapped in the Midwest) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Busman's Honeymoon (Mass Market Paperback)
This is the 13th Lord Peter novel, and the fourth in the Lord Peter/Harriet Vane story. This is definitely NOT a good place to begin the series.
BUSMAN'S HONEYMOON begins shortly after GAUDY NIGHT. The opening chapter consists of letters and diary enteries from their family and friends concerning the wedding. For fans of the series these are hilarious portraits of the various characters, the delightful Dowager Duchess, the obnoxious Duchess of Denver, the unflappable Bunter and others.
The newly wed Wimseys take up the action after their escape from the reception as they drive to their honeymoon destination, their newly purchased weekend cottage, 'Talboys'. The carefully arranged plans for a peaceful honemoon begin to come apart at their arrival. The house is cold, dark and locked, the former owner nowhere to be found, and no one apears to be aware of their pending arrival. These obstacles are overcome, the family takes up residence but the next day the missing former owner turns up - dead in the basement.
Naturally the Wimseys solve the crime as they sort out the details of their new life.
The only flaw I see with this novel is that the mystery aspect is a bit labored. Sayers was quite fond of the 'time-table' sort of mystery but tended to belabor the point. This, coupled with the array of characters/suspects that appear and are all given quite a lot of action, cause the story to drag a bit. Still, the solution is clever, the characters are charming and the scenes between Peter and Harriet are gems, finally resolving their 5 year (and 4 book) romance.
The biggest problem with this novel is that it is the last full-length book in the series. Even though we were given farewell glimpses of many old friends from earlier books it is still sad to say goodbye.
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars If only it were not abridged, August 31, 2010
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This is a favorite of mine and I looked forward to listening to Peter and Harriet wrangle out their new marriage and solve a murder while I am suffering in commuter traffic. Sayers orginally wrote Busman's Honeymoon as a play and later fleshed it out to a novel, so it can stand alone without the exposition, relying on sparkling dialogue to keep listeners entertained. If I didn't know the novel so well, I might not miss the omitted bits. The gossipy letters among society ladies that set up the marriage are gone, and the listener jumps immediately into the newlyweds' late night arrival at Talboys with no preamble. Small scenes of country life are jettisoned in favor of speeding the murder investigation. All the actors are excellent, and I enjoy listening to Ian Carmichael without having to look at him - he was not the best physical embodiment of Peter Wimsey, in my opinion. Not sorry I bought it, only wish the script writers had made different choices on what to keep.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars From A Dorothy L. Sayers Groupie, May 20, 2000
This review is from: Busman's Honeymoon (Mass Market Paperback)
As a DLS Groupie, I love all of her books, but especially those books that pertain to the Harriet Vane character. This book, as well as 'Gaudy Night' by Sayers, is primarily about the relationship of Lord Peter Wimsey and Harriet Vane. The extraordinary thing about all of Sayers' books is her beautiful amd sensual use of language to paint a picture with words.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The culmination of the three previous Harriet Vane novels., August 4, 1998
By A Customer
This review is from: Busman's Honeymoon (Mass Market Paperback)
Dorothy L. Sayers' "Busman's Honeymoon" can be considered her finest "all inclusive" Lord Peter Wimsey novel. She skillfully combines the culmination of the Wimsey/Vane romance and a "domestic mystery". Whereas other of her novels (The Nine Tailors, for example) could be considered her best mysteries, this book is beautifully written. The reader is expected to have a passing knowledge of England at the time and the life to date of the characters, as well as a classically literate education. Don't let this put you off, however; the book stands perfectly well alone. It's old - it's not outdated.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Love Story With Detective Interruptions, July 10, 2004
By 
This review is from: Busman's Honeymoon (Mass Market Paperback)
Summer 2004 Reading List - Mini Review
I was intrigued by the premise of this book: An accomplished detective and a famous mystery writer marry, only to discover a corpse in the cellar of their recently purchased home the day after their wedding.
This book is subtitled "A Love Story With Detective Interruptions" and lives up to that billing. I had not read any of the previous books in the Lord Peter Wimsey series but I did not find this an impediment. Sayers did a good job of making Busman's Honeymoon accesible as either a stand alone novel or part of her Wimsey/Vane story line. I so liked the characters that I am going to try to read previous installments in the series.
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21 of 27 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Last completed novel containing Harriet Vane., November 11, 2006
The title "Busman's Honeymoon" is sort of a play on words. Look up busman's holiday in the dictionary. In fact it was a play that was also made into a movie "Hunted Honeymoon" (1940) starring Robert Montgomery and Constance Cummings. There are still some short stories and a novel finished by someone else; however Busman's Honeymoon is the last of the novel series containing Harriet Vane. Some of the short stories are "The Haunted Policeman" and "Talboys."

The book starts off with a series of letters from well-known friends of the couple, described previous in Dorothy L. Sayers' novels. They bring you up to date while describing the wedding of Lord Peter Wimsey and Harriet Vane. Some of the charters are just referenced yes it ought on and you will have to have read the previous novels for fuller detail.

The primary thrust of this novel is the relationship between Lord Peter Wimsey and Harriet Vane. With exquisite descriptions of their life and the English environment in which they live. Oh yes, there is also a mystery. However the mystery does not overshadow the rest of the story.

One of the most important overlooked items in most descriptions of this book is the expanded explanation of the history and relationship of Bunter to Lord Peter.
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Busman's Honeymoon
Busman's Honeymoon by Dorothy L. Sayers (Mass Market Paperback - February 1, 1995)
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