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Butch Cassidy: Beyond the Grave Kindle Edition

3.8 out of 5 stars 15 customer reviews

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Length: 207 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled

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Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

By most accounts, Butch Cassidy (born Robert LeRoy Parker) was an affable, charming rogue who rustled cattle and robbed banks and trains with a smile. Perhaps that explains why many refuse to accept his ignominious end—shot to pieces by Bolivian troops in a grubby mining town. Jameson, an award-winning author and contributor to the History Channel, is determined to cast doubt on that unsavory demise. Much of this compact work is a useful and conventional biography of Cassidy. Jameson describes his young life as the oldest child of devout Mormon parents, growing up poor in Utah. He seems to have drifted slowly into a life of crime as he moved from various ranching jobs across Utah, Colorado, and Wyoming. Jameson describes his partnership with the Sundance Kid as a mating of opposites who shared and enjoyed each other’s restless spirits. Unfortunately, when Jameson examines Cassidy’s death, he chooses to magnify small inconsistencies in the reports and is too willing to accept claims that Cassidy survived and returned to the U.S. It seems Jameson concludes that Cassidy lived on because that was a more satisfying ending. --Jay Freeman

Review

Professional treasure hunter and author Jameson (Lost Treasures of American History) is dismissive of the 'poor chronicling and unsubstantiated research' by outlaw history hobbyists. Outlaw history is not ranked high in academia, he notes, so Jameson sets out to separate fact from fiction. He traces Cassidy from his Utah boyhood to his criminal activities with the Wild Bunch and the Sundance Kid, noting erroneous perceptions generated by the popular 1969 film, Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid. Concluding chapters examine conflicting accounts of Cassidy’s 'enigmatic and controversial' final years. Was Butch Cassidy killed in a shootout in Bolivia in 1908, as tradition has it? Or did he return to the U.S. alive to visit family and friends? Some think Cassidy returned with the identity of William T. Phillips—'Could it be only a coincidence that Phillips looked amazingly like Cassidy?' and appeared from nowhere around the time Cassidy allegedly died? Phillips died in 1937, leaving behind 'The Bandit Invincible,' a manuscript filled with little known facts about Cassidy. Many readers will find themselves transfixed by Jameson’s probing discussion of this intriguing mystery, which he calls 'a historical conundrum.' (Publishers Weekly)

By most accounts, Butch Cassidy (born Robert LeRoy Parker) was an affable, charming rogue who rustled cattle and robbed banks and trains with a smile. Perhaps that explains why many refuse to accept his ignominious end—shot to pieces by Bolivian troops in a grubby mining town. Jameson, an award-winning author and contributor to the History Channel, is determined to cast doubt on that unsavory demise. Much of this compact work is a useful and conventional biography of Cassidy. Jameson describes his young life as the oldest child of devout Mormon parents, growing up poor in Utah. He seems to have drifted slowly into a life of crime as he moved from various ranching jobs across Utah, Colorado, and Wyoming. Jameson describes his partnership with the Sundance Kid as a mating of opposites who shared and enjoyed each other’s restless spirits. (Booklist)

. . . [M]eticulously researched, and the author’s love of the subject matter comes through clearly. Reading Butch Cassidy: Beyond the Grave is like reading a really good mystery. (Deseret News)

Product Details

  • File Size: 4467 KB
  • Print Length: 207 pages
  • Publisher: Taylor Trade Publishing (July 25, 2012)
  • Publication Date: July 25, 2012
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B008RYSNAU
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #813,404 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
The name Butch Cassidy conjures up visions of cowboy days in the old West, of bandits and outlaws, and of a sidekick named the Sundance Kid. The name also reminds us of a movie popular in the late 1960s. But what does anyone really know about Butch Cassidy? A lot and yet nothing at all. At least that is the feeling one comes away with after reading W.C. Jameson's latest book, Butch Cassidy: Beyond the Grave.

The book is a quick read, entertaining, and full of a great deal of information and analysis. Jameson seems to be the kind of writer who is not a hands-on researcher himself, but who prefers to survey a wide variety of research performed by both professionals and amateurs and attempt to string their theories together to make a compelling story. He accomplishes this quite well. He has consulted many sources and provides the reader with an extensive bibliography. The problem is that so much contradictory information has been published over the years regarding Butch that it feels as though the whole story hasn't been fully told.

Jameson admits the entire puzzle hasn't been completed. He puts information out there and perhaps hopes that with the publication of this book someone else will come forward with new proof about the fate of Butch Cassidy in support of his ideas. Meanwhile, Jameson has written a decent tribute to a famous outlaw who also happened to be - and Jameson feels strongly about this - a thoughtful, kind, helpful, and friendly gentleman.

Whether one likes tales of the Old West or just likes to read biographies, this book will certainly occupy a few hours of one's time in a pleasant way.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
It was interesting, but the author's conclusions dealing with W.T. Phillips are dated since it has been proven Phillips was not Cassidy. But he does bring up some good information and questions the lack of evidence to prove that Cassidy was killed in Bolivia in 1908.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I've never had any doubt that Butch Cassidy didn't die at the hands of the Bolivian army and lived a long, quiet life after dropping off the Outlaw Trail. Jameson lays out the evidence and leaves the reader convinced in the end.
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Format: Hardcover
This is a down to earth biography of the outlaw Butch Cassidy, which is written in a causal style with some an interesting style of inserting in effect analytical asides and commentary (e.g., regarding "hobbyist" historians). The bio part is straightforward, a quick read, but at times somewhat choppy or at least chunky to my eye. The book appears well sourced -- see bibliography -- and often cites sources, but it has no footnotes/endnotes.

The book is particularly about his alleged death, which it basically does suggest is pretty dubious, at least given the reports we have. It makes clear that fiction and myth clouds our knowledge, including the Newman/Redford film. What clearly happened basically stops early 1908 though the book provides various accounts -- which conflict in various details (including Butch Cassidy's death) -- of what seems to be "beyond the grave," that is his supposed death in 1908. Very little or nothing is told about the Sundance Kid after this "death."

The book also suggests a certain alias was used, at least the evidence leans that way, by Butch Cassidy after his supposed death. Major concern here. The book explains the alias/identity only enters history early 1908 via his marriage in the U.S. But, we left off with Butch Cassidy in Bolivia here, working at a mine company with SK and later said to take up another means of employment. Then, the robbery/death of the two "North Americans" occur in November 1908. We also later learn that Butch Cassidy's sister wrote that years later he returned home & explained what happened to him. There is no mention here of a wife, to begin with, and the timing is off -- no mention of him returning to the U.S. in 1908 and then going back -- he had to do this because of the marriage license.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This has indeed been a prolific year for Wild Bunch historians. First we saw the fine work by family member Bill Betenson, "Butch Cassidy-My Uncle", soon followed by "He Rode with Butch and Sundance", The story of Harvey (Kid Curry) Logan by Mark Smokov. Now we have what I find to be the best of the lot; "Butch Cassidy Beyond the Grave" by W.C.Jameson. This one goes into great detail to explain the complex series of events that perhaps took place in Bolivia in 1908. This a very enjoyable read and one you will want for you collection.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I enjoyed parts of this book but, in the end, one has to swallow a substantial amount of somewhat flimsy evidence to buy the concept that Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid escaped their gruesome fate in South America. Nevertheless, it was interesting reading and offered additional insight into the character and motivations of both Butch and Sundance. It was entertaining but not particularly convincing.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
It's been a bit since I read this book, with numerous others covered since then. I don't remember much about it, but I remember I was never bored as I eagerly read this account of a true western hero.
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