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Buying America Back: A Real Deal Blueprint for Restoring American Prosperity Paperback – April 10, 2012


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Buying America Back: A Real Deal Blueprint for Restoring American Prosperity + Re-Made in the USA: How We Can Restore Jobs, Retool Manufacturing, and Compete With the World
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 192 pages
  • Publisher: SelectBooks; 1 edition (April 10, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1590792300
  • ISBN-13: 978-1590792308
  • Product Dimensions: 0.4 x 6.3 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,770,802 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Alan Uke is a San Diego businessman, entrepreneur and community leader. His vision and business skills have provided hundreds of jobs and revenues for the San Diego area for over 40 years.

More About the Author

Alan Uke (pronounced UK) is a San Diego businessman, entrepreneur, and community leader. He has provided hundreds of jobs and revenues for the San Diego area for over 40 years and is the architect of the successful federal Automobile Smog Index.

He started his company, Underwater Kinetics, 41 years ago while attending the University of California at San Diego. Uke holds over 40 patents and exports his SCUBA diving, industrial lighting, and protective case products to over 60 countries.

He is recipient of the Entrepreneur of the Year Award for Consumer Products from Entrepreneur Institute, 2004 Patriot of the Year by the Desert Pacific Council of Boy Scouts of America, and the Doctor Lutz Award for lifetime service to the senior community.

Past experiences range from Fundraising Chair for the Boy Scouts of America to Vice-Chair of St. Vincent De Paul Village to President of the San Diego Taxpayers Educational Foundation/North Council on Aging through board member of San Diego County Area on Aging Advisory Council.

He is also a member of the World President's Organization (WPO) where he served on numerous top-level delegations in Washington and represented the voice of American business to our nation's leadership.

He is also Founder Emeritus/Founding Board President of the San Diego Aircraft Carrier Museum which acquired the USS Midway in June 2004.

Customer Reviews

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See all 9 customer reviews
This makes for very interesting comparisons.
C. Wagner
That makes this book's ability to exceed my expectations even more remarkable.
David Macdonald Carlson
This book is a must read for anyone who consumes!
AW

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By AW on June 11, 2012
Format: Paperback
In his book, "Buying America Back", Alan Uke explains the flaws in our current "Country of origin" labels and proposes an alternate, more informative label that will inform consumers of the true origin of their products based on "percent cost per country" and "trade ratios".

Corporations have cashed in the "Made in America" label in the same sense that fast food companies like Mc Donalds have claimed to be "healthy", and corporations with poor environmental records like Halliburton & BP are claiming to be "GREEN".

Without proper, informative labeling, it is impossible for consumers to know where their hard earned American dollars are going. Simply because an item says "made in America", does not mean it is so, and the same goes for all other countries. In the era of globalization, most products contain components from multiple countries, and having the option to use our purchasing power to effectively stimulate the economy needs to be a right available at every transaction.

The most powerful points in this book are:

1.) American manufacturing is making its final death rattle due to persistent trends of companies moving abroad for short-term, short-sighted profit goals.

2.) Big box stores offer cheap goods at a very high cost!

3.) Just because you buy an import, does not mean that you are necessarily wronging the economy. An informative section on "trade ratios" describes that buying a products from countries, such as the UK, are balanced with the USA...meaning If we spend a dollar on an English good, on average, that dollar will be spent by the English on an American good.
Other countries, such as China, take a nationalistic approach by avoiding American products in order to stimulate their economy...A dollar spent on a Chinese good will only yield us a quarter in the long run!

Where did my cheese go???

This book is a must read for anyone who consumes!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Sean on June 7, 2012
Format: Paperback
In response to national economic recession, countless opinions are voiced on how bad it is, why it is, and how to remedy it. Most are about governmental intervention, fixing things from the top-down; this is the first solution I've seen that is fundamentally bottom-up, from the consumer level. It's not about taxes, tariffs, or trade laws, it's simply about information. Uke's idea is to supply detailed country of origin information directly to the consumer on product labeling. Just like a difference in cholesterol and hydrogenated corn syrup may make a difference in how you buy cereal, specific country-of-origin labels may influence how you buy many products. This doesn't significantly alter your lifestyle as a consumer, but makes a big difference on the American economy, increasing the value of the dollar and creating jobs. This is a simple idea against which I can't seem to find any real argument. Information is good for everyone.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By David Macdonald Carlson on April 25, 2012
Format: Paperback
Every once in a while, you'll stumble upon a book that significantly changes the way you see the world. This is one of those books.

I already expected something interesting after seeing endorsements from two famous people who rarely, if ever, agree on anything: former Green party presidential candidate Ralph Nader and the very conservative congressman (and former House Armed Services Committee Chair) Duncan Hunter. That makes this book's ability to exceed my expectations even more remarkable.

Buying America Back has everything you want in a great nonfiction book. I'd rank it up there with Levitt and Dubner's excellent book Freakonomics in its ability to turn an economic discussion into a compelling, easy-to-read, and fascinating page turner. Unlike Freakonomics, however, its scope is global rather than narrow, and Uke's suggestions are prudent and actionable rather than amusing and anecdotal. It's clear that Uke - who appears to be a first-time author, but has an impressive background as a successful business owner and a history of spearheading valuable, bipartisan proposals in the public sector - not only has a keen, original mind, but has also given this subject a lot of thought. He also must have had a good team around him to make this such an exceptional book, especially for a first-time author.

However, what was most striking about this work is its potential - with no trade restrictions, subsidies, or costly regulations (and almost no cost to businesses or taxpayers!) - to drastically improve the state of the U.S. economy on the scale of tens or hundreds of billion dollars and hundreds of thousands of new jobs annually.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By C. Wagner on June 13, 2012
Format: Paperback
The introduction presents two major points:
"The economic foundation of our country has been severely eroded over the past forty years. I am not talking only about the millions of factory jobs that have been lost, but also the creative people in research and development, and our professions-such as engineers, scientists, and chemists- who are being replaced by outsourcing. Our future as a nation as individuals is being threatened." (P. ix.)
And:
"You are not alone. We have to band together before it's too late." (P. x.)
Uke goes on to say that only a populist movement that refuses to vote for candidates who do not advocate for America's best interests and refuses to buy products that are not in America's best interest can restore American prosperity.
"The simple answer is that to bring back American jobs and support the American economy, we must change our buying habits and purchase products that are manufactured here..." (P. 4.)
"The only portion of the American population that benefits from the outsourcing of our high-technology goods is a mere handful of corporate owners, frequently foreign, whose property margins are sky-rocketing thanks to the dip in production costs..." (P. 20.) So the nation loses the ability to innovate, and billions of dollars that would not have been shared by Those Who Rule Over Us.
Okay. Okay. And, yah, yah, yah. You're heard it all before, but the book really gets interesting in pages 87- 152 where countries are pitted against the United States as trading partners. The U.S. loses in all but a small percentage of trading scenarios.
And, in one of the scenarios, if you counted the illegal drugs purchased by the U.S.
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