Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Byzantium: The Decline and Fall Hardcover – Deckle Edge, November 7, 1995


Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover, Deckle Edge
"Please retry"
$31.68 $5.64

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

This Book Is Bound with "Deckle Edge" Paper
You may have noticed that some of our books are identified as "deckle edge" in the title. Deckle edge books are bound with pages that are made to resemble handmade paper by applying a frayed texture to the edges. Deckle edge is an ornamental feature designed to set certain titles apart from books with machine-cut pages. See a larger image.

Product Details

  • Series: Byzantium (Book 3)
  • Hardcover: 528 pages
  • Publisher: Knopf (November 7, 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0679416501
  • ISBN-13: 978-0679416500
  • Product Dimensions: 1.6 x 6.7 x 9.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.9 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (29 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #328,638 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

With this volume, Norwich completes his magisterial narrative history of Byzantium. As in the earlier volumes (Byzantium: The Early Centuries, LJ 3/1/89; and Byzantium: The Apogee, LJ 1/92), he seeks to rectify the negative impressions perpetuated by 18th-century historian Edward Gibbon. Norwich records the history of a brilliant civilization that endured for over 11 centuries. From the founding of Constantinople (capital of Byzantium) by the first Christian Roman emperor and Byzantium's first flowering, to its fatal weakening after the treacherous attack on Constantinople by Western knights in the Fourth Crusade in 1204 and the valiant death of the last Byzantine emperor in 1453 at the hands of the conquering Turks, Norwich has told Byzantium's story in elegant and moving prose. This last volume in the three-part history of an unfairly neglected European civilization is highly recommended for public and academic libraries.
Robert Andrews, Duluth P.L., Minn.
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From the Inside Flap

Third volume in the series. With 32 pages of illustrations and 10 maps and tables.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
5 star
20
4 star
6
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
2
See all 29 customer reviews
I have read all three volumes twice now.
GVGY48C@PRODIGY.COM
The Byzantium trilogy is indeed an excellent addition to my history bookshelf.
CMLee
Norwich makes you care about his characters, warts and all.
Michael Confoy

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By CMLee on February 15, 2000
Format: Hardcover
Others have written at length about the scholarship and erudition. The Byzantium trilogy is indeed an excellent addition to my history bookshelf. If you need any encouragement to buy it, then just read a couple of the footnotes: "neither the imperial army nor Alexius Comnenus [the Emperor] emerges with much credit from the bloodbath of Levunium." footnote: "Anna Comnena (in The Alexiad, a history) exonerates her father from any involvement in the massacre, but then she would, wouldn't she?" Or regarding the Emperors before Alexius Comnenus: "...Inflation, which had already begun under Michael VII, (footnote here), spiraled more dizzily than ever." Footnote; "He was popularly known as 'Parapinaces', or 'Minus-a-quarter', since the gold nomisma, after having remained stable for more than 500 years, was said to have lost a quarter of its value during his reign." On an imperial marriage, the footnote reads: "The marriage evoked 100 lines of peculiarly flatulent verse from Claudian, the Epithalamium ending with an affecting picture of an infant son sitting on his parents' knees. Maria is said, however, to have lived and died a virgin." I recommend this book, and the other two books (Byzantium: The Early Centuries, and Byzantium: The Apogee) highly. Read them. You won't be disappointed. I draw a parallel between the books and what Lord Norwich said about the Byzantine Emperors: "Some of these Emperors were heroes, others were monsters; but they were never, never dull."
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
20 of 21 people found the following review helpful By James Yanni on December 9, 2000
Format: Hardcover
Before I read this book, I knew nothing about Byzantium. So I was a bit overwhelmed by the sheer volume of information, and realized after I started that I had made a mistake; I didn't realize when I bought this book that it was the third volume of a three-volume set. Doubtless, it would have been less overwhelming to start at the beginning, especially for someone like me, with no previous knowledge of the subject. Still, I learned a great deal from this book; not only was it informative, but it wasn't nearly as dry and impenatrable as I'd been afraid it might be. In fact, the style is downright readable; Norwich actually has a rather pleasant, if dry, sense of humor.
I definitely plan on getting the first two volumes of this series, and continuing my education on the history of Byzantium.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Glenn McDorman on August 13, 2002
Format: Hardcover
The final volume of Norwich's Byzantine history is a literary trimph, despite the disintegrating nature of the civilization being written about. In this volume Norwich begins in the aftermath of the battle of Manzikert in 1071 and finishes with the conquest of Constantinople by the Ottomans in 1453. Norwich uses his elegant prose style to present this tragic story in a highly moving way.
All three volumes read like a eulogy at the funeral of beloved relative. In this period of dehumanizing social sciences Norwich brings the people of the past alive, and treats them with respect and dignity even when their behavior does not necessarily inspire kind treatment. The role and majesty of Byzantium has been overlooked in the West for centuries; in doing his best to rectify that Norwich has created one of the masterpieces of historical writing.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 20, 1998
Format: Hardcover
Too often history books are written solely for academics, leaving the layperson struggling in a morass of uninteresting facts, punctuated by poor writing. Norwich is an exception to this. Academically, his books are sound. He is one of the pre-eminent Byzantine scholars of today. Yet, his work is also readable, interesting and dare I say enjoyable. If you're a fan of history, or are simply looking for something different to read, any one of these three books (Early Centuries, Apogee or Decline & Fall) are well worth the effort.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By doc peterson VINE VOICE on June 21, 2008
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Norwich's final volume in his sweeping history of the Byzantine Empire is bitter-sweet. As Norwich himself recognizes in his introduction, when he concluded writing it, it was as if he was saying farewell to an old friend. I felt the same way when I read the concluding chapter.

Norwich focuses almost exclusively on political history, a reason for which I had previously deducted a star in reviews of his other works in the trilogy. Having read the entire set, it clearly warrants 5 stars, especially given his poignant concluding chapters detailing the breach of the walls of Constantinople in 1453, an epilogue of the survivors, and - as is fitting to a history that has been long overlooked and denied its place in world history - the reaction of Western Europe.

Having read Norwich's histories of the rise and zenith of Byzantium, it was oddly sad to read of its gradual decline, a death by a thousand cuts as Byzantium was beset by enemies from all directions. His account of the sacking of Byzantimum during the Fourth Crusade was particularly moving. As a historian, it is expected to remain somewhat at a distance from the period and people studied; that I had such a reaction is testament to the power of Norwich's words.

I recommend this book - and the others preceeding it - highly. There are lessons to be learned here not only about how once great and wealthy empires disintegrate and collapse, but also about the subject matter itself: the West, and indeed the world owe Byzantium much, as Norwich eloquently demonstrates.
4 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?