Buy Used
$4.99
Used: Acceptable | Details
Sold by CWJBOOKS
Condition: Used: Acceptable
Comment: Ex-Library Hardcover , heavy wear to book edges and cover , all the usual library marks and stickers
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

CARL ERSKINE'S TALES FROM THE DODGER DUGOUT Hardcover – May 1, 2000


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$27.49 $4.99

Best Books of the Year
See the Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 200 pages
  • Publisher: Sports Publishing LLC; First Edition edition (May 1, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1582612463
  • ISBN-13: 978-1582612461
  • Product Dimensions: 1 x 5.8 x 8.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,728,491 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Kirkus Reviews

Brooklyn's beloved Oisk recalls life in Ebbetts Field and after.Erskine was a pitcher for the legendary Brooklyn Dodgers teams of the '40s and '50s, a 12-year major-league veteran who logged 122 victories, including a pair of no-hitters. As one of the famed Boys of Summer, he appeared in six World Series, most of them against the hated rivals from the Bronx, the New York Yankees. Off the field, Erskine is a soft-spoken Hoosier native, an affable, even sweet man, and it is those qualities that shine through this pleasant, if inconsequential book of anecdotes. At the outset of the book, Erskine writes, I can tell these stories because I was there, and he was, indeed, present for many of them, but too many of the items recounted herein are stories that have been told before elsewhere, often by better tale-bearers than the likable banker from Anderson, Indiana. However, there are a few real gems in this volume, ranging from Preacher Roe's decision to retire to a recipe for the buttermilk cake that became a lucky talisman for the '55 world champions from Brooklyn. There are, appropriately, a raft of stories about Branch Rickey, focusing on the Dodger general manager's legendary combination of penny-pinching, piety, and perspicuity. Erskine recounts the tale of Rickey's signing Jackie Robinson to become the first black major leaguer, but this is a story that has been told many, many times before. He also recounts some very funny anecdotes about contract negotiations with the tightfisted Rickey (including one in which he actually managed to get the better of the Dodger g.m., albeit with a little assist from the Commissioner's office). Erskine is a charming reminder of a simpler sports age, seemingly more innocent than today's mega-dollar, television-driven industrial era, but he is also smart enough to recognize and intimate that his own times were not quite as noble as they are painted by nostalgia buffs. Unfortunately, the book suffers from a total and complete lack of organization, with stories presented in no apparent order. Real fans, however, won't mind.A painlessly amusing walk around the old Dodger haunts in a Brooklyn that is no more. -- Copyright © 2000 Kirkus Associates, LP. All rights reserved.

Review

"Along with his ability on the mound, (Erskine) proves himself to be a talented storyteller."
--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
5 star
7
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
1
1 star
0
See all 9 customer reviews
I've read hundreds of baseball books and I enjoyed it.
Bill Emblom
As a avid baseball fan and former coach, I appreciated Carl's sharing of his personal and professional experiences.
"choffman@sagamorepub.com"
His book is a collection of memories from those days gone by.
Michael J Woznicki

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By "choffman@sagamorepub.com" on October 30, 2000
Format: Hardcover
Carl Erskine's short stories of baseball in the early '50's refreshed my memories of growing up in Upstate New York. I remember vividly the cross-town rivalries of the Dodgers and the Yankees. I remember the World Series of 1956 when Don Larson pitched his masterpiece against the Dodgers. It is refreshing to read about those experiences, and to read about the background of the game itself.
Carl was always willing to show friendship with his competitive peers outside the `white lines', and willingly received Jackie Robinson's contributions to the game. It was fun to read about how the communities and families got involved in the early years of baseball on the professional level. Carl's attitude outside the competitive realm was always acceptable in anyone's home or community.
Because I am not an avid reader, the way in which Carl formatted his book is interesting and fun to sit down and read. As a avid baseball fan and former coach, I appreciated Carl's sharing of his personal and professional experiences.
I have a great deal of respect for a personable professional like Carl Erskine.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Michael J Woznicki HALL OF FAME on July 31, 2000
Format: Hardcover
Carl Erskine played baseball with the famed "Boys of Summer", better known as the Brooklyn Dodgers. His career allowed him to meet and play with such greats as Jackie Robinson, Pee Wee Reese, Sandy Koufax, and Bob Feller. His book is a collection of memories from those days gone by.
As a true fan of the game and the history of baseball, this book was very impressive. There are no real chapters and no real storylines, this book does not tell a history of baseball, instead it gives you the history of one of baseball most storied franchises.
Erskine brings to life what it was like to play, live, eat and sleep Brooklyn Dodgers Baseball. Packed into 230 pages is some of the funniest, greatest and most unbelievable tales you'll ever read. Also included are some of those hard to find photos of great from the past.
For under $20.00 you have a book that should be in the Hall of Fame in Cooperstown. Stop by Sports Publishing Inc. website and take a look at several more books on baseball and several other sports as well, you won't be disappointed.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Bill Emblom on October 14, 2000
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
A book doesn't have to be heavy reading to merit five stars. I was a kid just getting interested in baseball during the glory years of "The Boys of Summer." Near the back of the book Carl says, "It's fun to look back at days and events that have long since past." That's the feeling I had while reading this book. However, this book would be for anyone including children with short attention spans since the book is a series of short anecdotes about his years with the Brooklyn Dodgers. I finished it in two sittings. I came across a number of familiar stories, but also a number I've never heard before even though I've read many books on the Brooklyn Dodgers. I did find a mistake on P.156 where Carl states that lights were first used in Cincinnati and Brooklyn in 1946. Lights were first used in Cincy in 1935 and in Bklyn. in 1938 with Vandermeer's second no-hitter. Nevertheless, if you want a quick read about these great years told my a player who deeply appreciates being part of that team, pick up a copy of this book. This would also be a good introductory book on this team for a child as well. I've read hundreds of baseball books and I enjoyed it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Darrell Edward Ehrlick on August 3, 2003
Format: Hardcover
As someone who never knew Ebbets Field, but heard plenty about the Brooklyn Dodgers and Carl Erskine, this book is a treasure. Erskine anchored the Brooklyn Dodgers during the glory years in the late 1940s and 1950s. This was not only a golden era for the Dodgers, but a golden era for baseball as well, when names like Mickey Mantle, Stan Musial and Jackie Robinson were not just faces on bubblegum cards, they were idols.
Erskine's book is a collection of memories. While they jump around in time, they are all fascinating and light hearted. Erskine does not go into long explanations about his philosophy of pitching or his view of baseball then versus baseball now, still his opinions and beliefs are easily ascertained.
Probably the most enjoyable part of this book is that Erskine doesn't believe that baseball owes him something. He understands the magical moment in history that he lived in. He has also preserved some colorful history that would otherwise be lost because many of the ballplayers he mentions have passed away. He has created not only a fun baseball read, but a valuable document for those in the future who will wonder, "What was it like when the Dodgers were in Brooklyn..."
The only criticism that I have of this book (and it is a minor one, to be sure) is that the stories were just meandering. Sometimes a story took place ten years after he played, followed by a story of Erskine in the minors. At other times, Erskine went over ground he'd already covered. While this is not a big deal, it, at times, slowed the pace of the book down. However, this is more the fault of the editor than the fault of Erskine.
If you liked Roger Khan's "The Boys of Summer" then this book is like going back for a sequel. This book is gracious, funny, and makes you appreciate what a special time the 1940s and '50s were in baseball and in America.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again