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CQ


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Editorial Reviews

Product Description

Captivating and sexy, CQ takes you behind the scenes of a sci-fi thriller being filmed in 1969 Paris but set in 'futuristic' 2001! Jeremy Davies (Saving Private Ryan), newcomer Angela Lindvall, Gerard Depardieu (Green Card) and Billy Zane (Titanic) shine in this "unpredictable, stylish and original" (Boxoffice) movie where past meets future, reality blurs with fantasy, and tight leather catsuits are the perfect accessory for a ray gun that can stop time! Novice filmmaker Paul (Davies) has just been given the chance of a lifetimeto direct the super spy film Codename Dragonfly. But when he starts to believe that the stunningly beautiful 'Dragonfly character (Lindvall) is seducing him from within the film Paul risks his new positionand his sanityto join her in an adventure beyond even his imagination!

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Jeremy Davies is a different kind of American in Paris. In the heady days of 1969, this aspiring director edits a silly sci-fi spy adventure by day while spending his nights obsessively filming his own life, much to the frustration of his stewardess girlfriend (Elodie Bouchez), who tires of his using his camera to avoid intimacy. First-time director Roman Coppola (son of Francis) creates a slight but fun picture steeped in 1960s movie lore: the film-within-a-film is a pop-art spectacle that recalls Barbarella, Modesty Blaise, and Danger: Diabolique, while its Italian producer (Giancarlo Giannini) is a high-living Dino De Laurentiis. If the film is slight, the details are right, from the opulent and outrageous sets to the meticulously retro special effects to the groovy music by Mellow. You could think of CQ as Coppola's , about a man so busy filming his life he forgets to live. --Sean Axmaker

Special Features

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Product Details

  • Actors: Jeremy Davies, Angela Lindvall, Élodie Bouchez, Gérard Depardieu, Giancarlo Giannini
  • Directors: Roman Coppola
  • Writers: Roman Coppola
  • Producers: Bob Bellion, Francis Ford Coppola, Gary Marcus, Georgia Kacandes, Jean-Claude Schlim
  • Format: Closed-captioned, Color, Dolby, Widescreen, Full Screen, NTSC
  • Language: English, French
  • Subtitles: English, French, Spanish
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.85:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: R (Restricted)
  • Studio: MGM Entertainment
  • DVD Release Date: September 10, 2002
  • Run Time: 88 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (36 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00006CXH2
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #83,855 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "CQ" on IMDb

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Trevor Willsmer TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on March 19, 2006
Format: DVD
Sofia Coppola may have got all the kudos with The Virgin Suicides and Lost in Translation, but, from a 60s movie buff's point of view, the other Coppola kid, Roman, turned out an even more enjoyable feature, CQ. Shame that no-one saw it. Barely released in the US (and not released at all in most countries), it's an engaging little number that pits underground cinema against Eurotrash moviemaking at a time when people still thought even pulp cinema could be the stuff of revolution (1969-70 to be precise).

A riff on Sullivan's Travels and 8½, it sees Jeremy Davies' editor of Franco-Italian co-pro 'Codename: Dragonfly' struggling to come up with a new ending while making his own personal film with borrowed equipment. Oh, and falling in love with the fictional main character, confusing film and reality (not only is he too busy documenting `the truth' of his life to see it around him but he even enters the film to sort out a plot hole) and possibly being targeted for retribution by Gerard Depardieu's fired firebrand director. (The door panel that Depardieu breaks that is later framed and given to the editors is actually one that Francis Ford Coppola smashed on one of his films!)

Filled with sly 60s cinema references from Fellini to Warhol (even the trailer he cuts for the film is inspired by the one for Dr Strangelove) and with some character touches straight out of James Joyce, the visual influence is much more Danger: Diabolik than Barbarella (John Phillip Law even appears in the film within the film), and Dean Tavoularis' spot-on production design and Robert Yeoman's superb photography are both pitch-perfect.
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Charles Burgess on June 17, 2005
Format: DVD
Bought the DVD after remembering the photo of a space-suited Angela Lindvall in a magazine the year the movie was released. Money well spent. The recreation of late 60s Europe is well done as is the purposely cheesy film-within-the-film. Perhaps it will lead to "Danger: Diabolik" and other genuine 60s films for you.
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15 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Roger Shreeve on October 7, 2002
Format: VHS Tape
Cheeky, cheesy, funny, and thoughtful! I discovered this small gem of a film and rented it w/no idea of it except for what the back cover disclosed. Upon initial reading, I thought it might be akin to the "Matt Helm" or "Flynnt" films of the 1960's with a twist or a spoof of the spy film genre. I was wrong.

It's Roman Coppola's (Nicholas Cage's cousin) sentimental treatment of his early movie-watching experience as well as the personel odyssey of a first time director against the backdrop of the making of a late 60's/early 70's spy film. The idea of a film within a film is not new and could be confusing; however, Mr. Coppola's use of the technique works for him here. Though it is not the best film of 2002, it is an intelligent, thought-provoking, and entertaining little movie.

The caliber of talent Mr. Coppola assembled in Jeremy Davis, Elodie Bouchez, Angela Lindvall, Giancarlo Giannini, Gerard Depardieu, Jason Schwartzman, John Philip Law, and Dean Stockwell go a long way in making this a little gem and not a lump of coal. The choice for casting worked nicely for this 1st time director. The confusion and searching portrayed by Davis' character kept me interested in his trials and tribulations as he tries to find truth through the media of movies in his life. It is his search that ultimately made me like the film. This main character is neither good or bad, but a man trying to find his way in the world he has chosen, meanwhile, like the rest of us, he still has a day job [sound editor-turn-director] to contend with while searching. It is Mr. Coppola's handling of this character that will either keep or lose you in the film. His first outing shows he has definite potential and not just b/c of family ties.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Tsuyoshi on January 22, 2003
Format: DVD
"CQ" is the first feature film directed by Roman Coppola, son of much famous director Francis Ford. But you should forget that fact for a while, and enjoy the strange world of the 1960s he created for the film.
The film is set in Paris in 1969, the time of revolution. An American film editor Paul (Jeremy Davis) is working for a small studio there hired by an Italian producer (Giancarlo Giannini, "Hannibal"). At his small flat, with his camera, Paul keeps on filming his own life, or making a film about the "truth" of life -- meaning cinema verite, you got it? -- while his sweet French girlfriend is not so enthusiastic about his works. Well, his life seems going nowhere when suddenly he is given a chance: a chance to direct a grade B-Sci-fi movie "Dragonfly" (not that Kevin's film). But there is one big trouble. They could not find the right ending of the film yet.
Coppola's "CQ" proceeds side by side with Paul's film-within-film "Dragonfly," featuring the titular female spy, who looks as if coming straight from "Modesty Blaise" and "Barbarella." Paul is absorbed in making this film, and drawn to the heroine (and its actress Valentine, perfectly played by Angela Lindvall) while his own life, especially the relations with his girlfriend, begins gradually to play the secondary role.
Even if you are not particularly a fan of the films of the late 60s, you'll soon find that the greatest virtue of "CQ" lies in its re-creation of the psychedelic fashion and energetic atomosphere of the time.
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