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CS: Don't defrag, reindex


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Showing 1-25 of 123 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Mar 7, 2009 12:48:35 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Jul 25, 2009 6:24:06 PM PDT
Bufo Calvin says:
I was wondering about defragging my Kindle. Defragging is a really good thing to do for your computer's drives. Without getting too technical, as you delete things from your computer, you end up with parts of programs that aren't next to each other. Think of it like having a shuffled deck of cards versus one that is all in order (Ace to King diamonds, Ace to King clubs, and so on). It's a lot faster to find the seven of hearts that way. So, I asked Customer Service about defragging, and they sent this:

==============
While it is not advisable to defrag your Kindles, they can be Indexed instead.
Please follow the instructions below to re-index your Kindle.

Removing the index files on both the internal memory and on the SD card. Steps for removal -

** Connect the Kindle to AC power before connecting to the computer **

On a Windows PC:
1. In Windows Explorer, Select Tools - Folder Options
2. In Folder Options, select the View Tab
3. In the View List, select the radio button to Show Hidden Files and Folders
4. Deselect the checkbox to Hide protected operating system files (the customer
may wish to re-enable after removing the index files from the Kindle)
5. Connect the Kindle to the PC
6. Open the Kindle internal memory on the PC
7. Open the System folder on the Kindle disk
8. Open the Search Indexes folder inside the System folder
9. Select all files inside the System Indexes folder and move them to the
Recycle Bin
10. Open the Kindle's SD card on the PC - repeat steps 7-9 to remove the index
files
11. Safely eject the Kindle and the Kindle's SD card from the PC
12. Disconnect the Kindle from the computer

On a Mac running OS X:
1. Connect the Kindle to the Mac
2. Open the Kindle internal memory on the Mac
3. Open the System folder on the Kindle disk
4. Open the Search Indexes folder inside the System folder
5. Select all files inside the System Indexes folder and move them to the Trash
6. Open the Kindle's SD card on the PC - repeat steps 7-9 to remove the index
files
7. Eject the Kindle and the Kindle's SD card from the Desktop
8. Disconnect the Kindle from the computer

PLEASE NOTE: Once the indexes are removed from the device, the Kindle will start
re-indexing all content.

It is highly recommended the user keep the device connected to power while the Kindle re-indexes the content. Indexing of all content should complete within 24 hours, at which time the increased power usage from heavy indexing will subside.
After this point, the device should behave as expected.
=================

Bufo Calvin
Amazon Author Central page:
http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B002E0NBIW

Posted on Mar 7, 2009 1:37:49 PM PST
Pamela says:
Thanks. Is this for K1 and/or K2?

Posted on Mar 7, 2009 1:49:50 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Apr 7, 2009 6:51:40 PM PDT
Bufo Calvin says:
Pamela, either one. :) I specifically asked them about both. I think they may be getting a bit tired of me, but they don't show it. ;) I'm waiting for them to give me a choice to choose having both when I'm asking a question.

Bufo Calvin

Posted on Mar 7, 2009 2:00:51 PM PST
Last edited by the author on Mar 7, 2009 2:01:40 PM PST
Pamela says:
Thanks. What about index.db? Okay to go as well? Since it sounds like it's the database file I'm just a hair hestitant. The log will replace itself so it's a no brainer.

Posted on Mar 7, 2009 2:05:51 PM PST
Pamela says:
Found a relic from Kindle Day gone by. My system still has the NowNow folder - or should I say did. :)

Posted on Mar 8, 2009 8:36:20 PM PDT
CTMom says:
Indexing is a pain & takes forever. WHY would I want to remove that file? No thanks.

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 9, 2009 1:16:40 AM PDT
Yeah I was wondering the same thing. Re-indexing the database has *nothing* at all to do with defragging, and if you carry a lot of book is just a big hassle.

Really seems like a colossal waste of time. If all you want is to free up the memory and force it to write all at once in a pseudo-defrag, I suggest this:

1. Remove your SD card.

2. Attach the kindle to your computer ans get into the system as instructed above.

3. Select all the files in the index folder and move them to a temporary folder on your computer

4. Disconnect and reboot (as in reset) your Kindle.

5. Re-attach it to your computer and copy over all the index files back where they came from.

That *might* force *some* of the files to defragment in theory - if they were ever fragmented in the first place. This is a custom OS here and it may not even fragment files at all. Truly, even doing what I suggest seems like a colossal waste of your time, time that could be spent reading a book or searchng for new books to buy.

Posted on Mar 9, 2009 6:41:43 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Apr 7, 2009 6:52:08 PM PDT
Bufo Calvin says:
Up to you, James and CT. :) Just reporting what Customer Service told me would optimize its operation. I'm big on maintaining my computers, most people never do it and don't really care. :)

I'd do it as a courtesy for somebody before I sold an old Kindle (assuming I had a new one on which to read ;) )...not that I have any plans to do that.

Just sharing the information, for what it's worth. :) Oh, and the question came out originally when I asked about defragging: good to know that they recommend that you do not do that.

Bufo Calvin

Posted on Mar 9, 2009 6:45:46 AM PDT
Diana says:
Thanks, have saved this for future reference. My Kindle is behaving as it should so I won't fix what isn't broken--but should I encounter any sluggishness, I will give it a try :)

Posted on Mar 9, 2009 6:47:50 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Mar 9, 2009 6:49:55 AM PDT
CTMom says:
Defragging a computer & reindexing a Kindle are completely different animals. Just saying. And if CS said that reindexing would "optimize the Kindles's operation" they would be recommending that everyone do it periodically. I suspect they just told you how to do it to give you something to do. No offense, but when you go looking for things to do, people will give you things to do. Frankly I wouldn't recommend it for people unless their Kindle isn't working properly. I too defrag my computers regularly but the Kindle is not a computer. Do you defrag your phone's memory? I delete stuff from my phone all the time- seems to be working just fine. You are not loading programs onto your Kindle, you are loading text & files... a completely different thing.

And were you to sell your old Kindle, you could just do a hard reset & erase everything on it & send it back to its factory defaults... just like you would any tech device like a phone or iPod or anything like that. No need to reindex. This just seems so unneccesary.

Frankly, I think this is just going to cause a lot more trouble than it's worth. But that's just my two cents.

Posted on Mar 9, 2009 6:55:19 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Apr 7, 2009 6:52:36 PM PDT
Bufo Calvin says:
No problem at all, CT. :) You could be right about CS, of course, although that hasn't been my experience with them in the past. They have sometimes given me an inexact and easier answer than the answer to the question I asked, but they eventually got it right. :)

I don't do much with my phone, but if there was a maintenance thing to do on it, I probably would. :)

Are you familiar with what a "double-force" question is for magicians? That kind of fits what you are saying. It's when you ask a question so that the person thinks they are affecting the outcome, when they aren't. For example, you have a cut deck of cards. You ask the participant to point to a half deck. If it's the one you want to have left you say, "Great, we'll leave that one." If it's not the one you want, you say, "Great, we'll remove that one." :)

Bufo Calvin

In reply to an earlier post on Mar 9, 2009 7:24:24 AM PDT
"I'd do it as a courtesy for somebody before I sold an old Kindle (assuming I had a new one on which to read ;) )...not that I have any plans to do that."

Bufo, wouldn't doing a factory reset before selling an old Kindle accomplish that and more?

Posted on Mar 9, 2009 9:37:51 AM PDT
Pamela says:
I did it, no problems here on main or SD, and my pages turn a bit faster. Could be it's just me tho'. I defrag regularly because my sytem gets high use. I was getting ready to defrag my K but don't need to now.

Posted on Mar 9, 2009 10:17:18 AM PDT
Last edited by the author on Apr 7, 2009 6:52:56 PM PDT
Bufo Calvin says:
D'oh! Good point, Melinda.

Bufo Calvin

Posted on Mar 21, 2009 8:10:34 AM PDT
I've always heard that defragging flash memory is unnecessary. Defragging is for hard-drives with heads that must physically move across the platters to read the data. Flash memory has no moving parts so it does not matter if the data is spread out, it still takes the same amount of time to read it.

Posted on Mar 21, 2009 12:48:49 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Apr 7, 2009 6:53:26 PM PDT
Bufo Calvin says:
That's useful, Ryan, thanks! :)

Bufo Calvin

Posted on Mar 21, 2009 4:30:39 PM PDT
Pamela says:
R.Y. - that is supported on various tech sites. Thanks for clarifying it for all.

I think, and of course I've been know to be wrong, that the reindexing is beneficial. Here's part of my reasoning. When I remove my SD card my Kindle still acts as if it's there. It's using the index last done. If I have moved a lot of things or changed things or it's invalid for whatever reason then the reindex would fix all of that. Yes it takes a bit of time sometimes, but when I removed my indexs per the instructions above I noticed no lag, no appreciable time for the "redindexing". JMHO

Posted on Dec 15, 2009 3:06:52 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Dec 15, 2009 3:07:46 AM PST
Vandan says:
Bufo, I followed your directions, removed all the index files, defragged my Kindle 2 international and then restarted it to reindex... access speed has improved a lot and, as a bonus, I got over 150 MBs of additional space that previous index files were occupying!

I think everybody should do it at least once every 2-3 months.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 15, 2009 3:52:17 AM PST
Bufo (and all), I think that the only good that this method would do for anyone is if you're actually eliminating/deleting old index files of books that you've permanently deleted from your Kindle. Deleting needed index files, files that will just regenerate themselves again anyway, doesn't really "defrag" your Kindle. It's those index files of deleted Kindle books that you really want to get off your Kindle, as they take up valuable drive space on your device, and can potentially make your Kindle run more slowly.

Posted on Dec 15, 2009 3:56:08 AM PST
L. MB says:
I can see it being helpful if you subscribe to a lot of magazines or newspapers and, like me, delte 98% of the books I read after I read them. If you save everything to Kindle, as some people do, it seems unlikely to as helpful, but I don't know a lot about computer technology.

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 15, 2009 3:56:08 AM PST
Yes Vandan, but you did a "defrag", yes(?), which is exactly what Amazon CS has apparently recommneded "not" doing per Bufo's post. Though, kudos to you for getting your Kindle space back with your effort. :)

Posted on Dec 15, 2009 4:05:28 AM PST
Last edited by the author on Dec 15, 2009 4:20:38 AM PST
I strongly suspect defragging isn't necessary on a flash drive, which is what you have in the Kindle. Access time to the various sectors on the "disk" won't be affected by where they are on the "disk", because there are no moving parts (no moveable read-write heads or spinning platters).

It's really only necessary to defrag on conventional hard disks, because it moves things around so that logically contiguous sectors are physically contiguous, thus speeding up typical sequential accesses (e.g. when loading a program or a data file from disk).

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 15, 2009 4:07:50 AM PST
Thanks for explaining that Mark. My wording on technological issues like this isn't always up to par.

Posted on Dec 15, 2009 6:39:48 AM PST
Vandan says:
@Bryan

Yes, I did defrag. Although we all know defragging a flash drive is not exactly going to make much difference, however, I like the contiguous arrangement of files that defraggler (a free program) does. As regards index files getting recreated on Kindle, I am sure that would happen again, but I shall undertake the same exercise as soon as I feel that the device has started taking too much time in processing page refreshes.

What I could not resolve was the time taken in file deletion. Sometimes my Kindle takes almost 30 seconds to 1 minute in removing a book/periodical. Has anyone else faced this problem? Any solutions?

In reply to an earlier post on Dec 17, 2009 11:27:30 PM PST
Meemo says:
As someone who had to do this to my K1 to recover the memory, I can tell you it isn't that bad, and can be well worth it. Once I removed all (yes ALL) the files from the indexing folder, I just left my Kindle plugged in when I wasn't reading. I recovered the memory, and everything seemed to work faster as well. Didn't take that long to get it reindexed either.
If everything's running smoothly with your Kindle, then there's no particular reason to do it. But it's running slowly, or if you're showing way less available memory than you know you should have, it's a pretty painless fix.
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Discussion in:  Kindle forum
Participants:  46
Total posts:  123
Initial post:  Mar 7, 2009
Latest post:  Jun 25, 2013

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