Industrial-Sized Deals TextBTS15 Shop Women's Handbags Learn more nav_sap_SWP_6M_fly_beacon $5 Albums Fire TV Stick Subscribe & Save Shop Popular Services tmnt tmnt tmnt  Amazon Echo Starting at $99 Kindle Voyage GNO Shop Now Deal of the Day

CSS: The Definitive Guide
Format: PaperbackChange
Price:$27.65+Free shipping with Amazon Prime
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

Showing 1-4 of 4 reviews(3 star)show all reviews
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon September 16, 2014
I guess it’s worth asking what you really expect from a book about CSS. I knew that this was an O’Reilly “definitive guide”, and having read quite a few such books, I knew that I was going to get into a lot of detail about the subject, but I was also expecting illustrative examples, tips and tricks and notes on real-world usage. This book really reads more like an annotated specification document. Most of the illustrations are reprinted directly from the CSS 2.1 specification, and the book is printed in black-and-white whereas the online specification, at least, is in color. There are a handful of notes about some of the finer points in the specification, but it felt like the book was targeted more at browser implementers than CSS authors. There’s no real attempt to clarify the trickier points of actually using CSS to style web pages; just a catalog of what the complete specification includes. The author does include a lot of asides about what has and hasn’t been implemented widely, but since the book is now 8 years out of date, those discussions have unfortunately become irrelevant. I think that in this case, my time would have been better spent reading, say, “The Zen of CSS Design” and then reading the online specification document from the w3c.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on January 25, 2013
Firstly, this book is good if you need to know a lot about established CSS conventions. However, it's pretty tedious just thanks to the nature of CSS, and unless you have a lot of time on your hands I'd strongly suggest just going through some web tutorials.

Another point is that is nothing in the book about animations and other widely supported but not established CSS. This has been deliberately left out by the author, but it's something to consider given that unofficial CSS rules are a large part of what's in use today.

Conclusion: if you have a lot of time and need to meticulously learn basic CSS, then this book is for you.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
12 of 19 people found the following review helpful
on July 3, 2007
I purchased this book with the expectation of being able to implement CSS for a website. The book felt very much textbook-ish, focusing too much on the theory and not enough on practical implementation. I had hoped for more best practices and more on layouts. This book is a great CSS reference but if you're looking for one-stop-shopping for building a CSS web site, you might be better off with something else.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
10 of 17 people found the following review helpful
on April 1, 2008
This is a book about CSS, and CSS, is about the presentation aspect of web pages. How the text appears, the size, the layout, etc.

However, the presentation style inside the book is kind of sloppy. For example, on page 186 and 187, when it talks about inline elements, Figure 7.33 "Strongly emphasized" is printed not as tall as Figure 7.34 and 7.35 when the CSS style is the same. And the word being used is "which is" and is changed to "that is" in Figure 7.34 and 7.35, when it is changing the vertical-align only. The reader would be better helped if they can see the contrast of the CSS style, without the change of wording for no reason at all. Also, in Figure 7.34, the bigger words should not overlap with the smaller words above, as tested in CSS compliant browsers, but it is printed so on the book.

Then again, in Figure 7.36, for no reason at all, the picture is shrunk down to 1/4 size of the previous examples, when they are all talking about the same case except for some vertical-align difference. It may be done just because the page is running out of space. That is pretty sloppy.

On page 181 to 182, it talks about various terms of the inline box model, and there is no figure at all to exemplify the terms at all. Then after the reader goes through a tough time to read through those text of hard definitions, 3 pages later, the figures start to appear. Please, can the book be designed so that the readers are considered? CSS is partly for making the content easy for the audience, and how about this CSS book is made easier for its audience too?

But I have to admit that this book is very definitive about CSS. If you spend some time to read this book, then you will understand CSS much better.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
     
 
Customers who viewed this also viewed
HTML and CSS: Design and Build Websites
HTML and CSS: Design and Build Websites by Jon Duckett (Paperback - November 8, 2011)
$17.38

CSS3: The Missing Manual
CSS3: The Missing Manual by David Sawyer McFarland (Paperback - January 6, 2013)
$28.48

CSS Pocket Reference
CSS Pocket Reference by Eric A. Meyer (Paperback - August 2, 2011)
$10.86
 
     

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.