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CSS: The Missing Manual: The Missing Manual Kindle Edition

97 customer reviews

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Length: 496 pages
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Editorial Reviews

Review

"Almost 500 pages of CSS help, with more than 100 pages of practical tutorials to guide you through the process of implementing and refining CSS to save you many a wasted hour. At GBP25, you'll be hard pressed to find a better guide to designing with CSS." .NET, February 2007

About the Author

David Sawyer McFarland is the president of Sawyer McFarland Media Inc., a web development and training company located in Portland, Oregon. In addition, he teaches JavaScript programming, Flash, and web design at the University of California, Berkeley, the Center for Electronic Art, the Academy of Art College, and Ex'Pressions Center for New Media. He was formerly the webmaster at the University of California, Berkeley, and the Berkeley Multimedia Research Center.


Product Details

  • File Size: 11029 KB
  • Print Length: 496 pages
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
  • Publisher: O'Reilly Media; 1 edition (August 24, 2006)
  • Publication Date: December 17, 2008
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services, Inc.
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0596526873
  • ISBN-13: 978-0596526870
  • ASIN: B0026OR2QI
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #905,503 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

152 of 159 people found the following review helpful By Brett Merkey on September 12, 2006
Format: Paperback
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Consider this a "getting started the right way with HTML and CSS" book. As such, it does a marvelous job.

I had a chance to get this beginner's book -- even though my bosses have been grossly overpaying me for years if I really were a beginner! Too many beginner books tend to over-simplify, which becomes a barrier to the more complex issues that a serious beginner will meet down the line. That is not the case here.

Step by step (sometimes even telling you what and when to click!) the book will take you through the basics of creating stylesheets for HTML. You will move from text format basics to moderately advanced layout issues and even print media stylesheets.

The text of the book itself is formatted in an interesting way that is easy to read and makes points clear. There are lots of images and diagrams. I liked the way many of the illustrations jutted out into the outer margin. The effect was a vivid enhancement and the book is bound in a way that lets it sit flat, making it easier to read while keying.

The author also performs a service by introducing, when appropriate, advanced issues and controversies that will surely interest the type of person motivated to go on in this field. The book includes appendices with a CSS Property Reference; CSS in Dreamweaver; and extended CSS Resources.

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71 of 72 people found the following review helpful By Thomas Duff HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on October 29, 2006
Format: Paperback
I've read and reviewed a number of books on Cascading Style Sheets (CSS), and I've learned something from them all. But for whatever reason, this one showed up at just the right time and has me inspired and motivated on a new project... CSS: The Missing Manual by David Sawyer McFarland.

Contents:

Part 1 - CSS Basics: Rethinking HTML for CSS; Creating Styles and Style Sheets; Selector Basics - Identifying What to Style; Saving Time with Inheritance; Managing Multiple Styles - The Cascade

Part 2 - Applied CSS: Formatting Text; Margins, Padding, and Borders; Adding Graphics to Web Pages; Sprucing Up Your Site's Navigation; Formatting Tables and Forms

Part 3 - CSS Page Layout: Building Float-Based Layouts; Positioning Elements on a Web Page

Part 4 - Advanced CSS: CSS for the Printed Page; Improving Your CSS Habits

Part 5 - Appendixes: CSS Property Reference; CSS in Dreamweaver 8; CSS Resources; Index

From the newbie perspective, this book works well. The first part of the book lays out the case for using CSS instead of pure HTML to format your pages and gain control of the style. It takes a subject that can be a bit intimidating and makes it very approachable. From there, you get a section on how exactly CSS works. This is much easier to digest than some of the more formal reference manuals I've seen in the past, and there's not as much focus on the minutia of every little variant that can happen. This is the material you'll use 95% of the time. Part 3 is where I started to get excited. I've been doing CSS for a while now, but over time I've built up designs that "work" but that could be done much better with what I've learned of late.
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59 of 61 people found the following review helpful By Andrew Violette on December 27, 2006
Format: Paperback
The problem with many of the CSS books that I have read is that most of them just reiterate the CSS specification. While this is useful knowledge, it doesn't cover what you need to know to build robust web applications that work consistently across the myriad of browsers on the internet.

This book covers the usual stuff with CSS: styles, precedence rules (the cascade), text and fonts, padding and spacing, the box model, positioning, tables, etc. It also goes into detail about how to apply this knowledge.

Some of the stuff that is included:

- building tabs with the Sliding Doors technique

- Entire chapter related to IE6 and how it diverges from the spec, and work-arounds (aka hacks) that can be used to correct these problems. Other browsers such as Opera and Safari are also covered throughout the book.

- Entire chapter related to floats and using these to create column-based layous. Work-arounds to problems and unexpected behavior are also covered.

- Entire chapter related to forms and how to use CSS for layout

The book is well edited and contains some really good graphics to explain the layout and positioning. Each chapter has a tutorial to help you work through the techniques.
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20 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Lam Yau Kit on September 8, 2006
Format: Paperback
I started builing my own site early this year with Dreamweaver 8 and "Missing Manual: Dreamweaver 8" helps me a lot. After a while, I find it very difficult to maintain and change with all those "table formating" and I decided to change to pure XHTML with CSS.

After spending months of time on looking at numbers of web sites and books. I can now recommand you to do following (if you are new to XHTML and XSS):-

(1) Read "First Head HTML with CSS and XHTML (you will then know all the basic, with fun); and

(2) Read "Missing Manuel: CSS" (you will then able to build your site as good as the best that you can found).

Enjoy.
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28 of 31 people found the following review helpful By Todd Hawley on September 6, 2006
Format: Paperback
A few months ago, I got Head First HTML. Reading it motivated me to update all of the web sites I maintain. This book will likely motivate me to update the Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) I use in my web pages. Between the informal writing style and the great step by step tutorials, this book makes learning about CSS quite painless and in fact fun. Whether it's formatting text, creating margins and borders, adding graphics, site navigation or formatting tables, there's a wealth of information here. I used to think CSS was something somehow scary and too difficult to learn. And now I instead realize it's a way to make web sites look awesome without having to resort to JavaScript, Perl or any other web site language (although clearly they can be beneficial too).

The book also contains reference material in the book's appendices, including a CSS Property Reference and online CSS Resources. This book does an excellent job in describing a "web language" every web designer (both pro and amateur) should know.
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