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CVJ: Nicknames of Maitre D's and Other Excerpts from Life Hardcover – November 12, 1987


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 222 pages
  • Publisher: Random House; 1ST edition (November 12, 1987)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0394553136
  • ISBN-13: 978-0394553139
  • Product Dimensions: 12.2 x 9 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.6 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,907,881 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Schnabel, a lion of the New York celebrity scene, here produces an autobiography at the grand old age of 35. Written in a flat, almost minimalist style, the memoir tells how a young man from Brooklyn, then Texas, lands in Soho, gets discovered, becomes rich and famous but preserves his artistic integrity as he bums around Europe and New York. Schnabel writes as if the daily doings of his cliquish circle are bound to be of immense interest to readers. He offers tough-talking advice to aspiring artists and sets down his critical opinions on numerous contemporaries; sometimes he drifts into a sort of Beat prose-poetry as he confronts themes like death and fame. Approximately 140 reproductions of paintings and objects are included. Author tour. (November
Copyright 1987 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal

Schnabel is a "hot" property in the contemporary art world. His brutal, broken crockery paintings and philosophical braggadocio have won him critical attention and acclaim, not to mention sales. Unfortunately, this autobiographical meander tells us much more than we need to know about Schnabel's views on artistic production. The artist's linking of passions to visual development seems a calculated evocation of, let's say, Jackson Pollock? The result is an intellectually tiresome text, with good, although incompletely captioned, illustrations. Though the book is expensive, some specialized and art school collections will want it. Paula A. Baxter, N.Y.P.L.
Copyright 1988 Reed Business Information, Inc.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Matt Jones on July 30, 2003
Format: Hardcover
As a young painter I value art books as my teachers, a removed version of the artist the book covers. Schnabel's book enhances (and probably created) the mythic figure he would become (including his Achilean fall) and offers great images of the works of art he created up until the book's publication. The photos of the work are excellent. The commentary is honest (and heavily colored by Schnabel) and story-like (written with a short "burst" style like a Chuck Pahlaniuk novel). It is nearly embarrassing (which is good). Schnabel is an undervalued painter and mind. This book is an excellent entry point into his thoughts, biography, and work. There are few decent Schnabel books out there and this is by far the best.
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4 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Jeffrey Ellis on October 10, 2001
Format: Hardcover
Though he's better known now as a filmmaker, Julian Schnabel was also one of the leading figures on the American Art Scene in the late '70s and '80s where, for better or worse, his gigantic canvases and infamous arrogance typified the last years of Warhol's New York. You either love the Schnabel of that period or you hate him. Luckily for me, I thought he was a genius and therefore I enjoyed his autobiography, Cvj. Covering his childhood in Texas, Cvj doesn't carry all of the insider gossip that a lot of readers will probably be looking for but it is a rare and fascinating glimpse into the development of one of the greatest artists of modern times.
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4 of 14 people found the following review helpful By another reader on October 13, 2006
Format: Hardcover
if you have heard of Schnabel, the illustrations in this book will persuade you that it's best not to see his work. If you would like to read the autobiography of a mediocre painter and consummate poser, this book might be for you.
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