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142 of 162 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon April 12, 2012
If you read my Juan of the Dead review, then you probably not only have an idea of how much I love horror films but also how much I thrive for originality and creativity in the genre. Something unique is so hard to come by anymore. It's as if Hollywood is afraid of taking risks. They'd rather remake something well-known to try and capitalize on a well-known name or franchise than go forward with something completely fresh and new because it might bomb. It makes sense on one hand, but for somebody who sees one hundred films a year or more it becomes kind of tiresome. You begin to make the most with what you have in front of you. If only a horror film could come along and be clever, original, pay homage, and offer something new for horror. That's exactly what you get with The Cabin in the Woods.

Curt (Chris Hemsworth) plans on taking his girlfriend Jules (Anna Hutchison) and his friends to his cousin's cabin. There's the new recruit to the football team Holden (Jesse Williams), the paranoid stoner Marty (Fran Kranz), and Jules friend Dana (Kristen Connolly) who is kind of on the fence of whether or not she'll enjoy herself on the trip. Everything seems to be progressing in typical horror movie fashion even up to the cellar door slamming open in the middle of their festivities. But something more sinister is going on; something that will put the lives of these five friends on the line.

The Cabin in the Woods is a horror film that is incredibly special. If you're a fan of anything by Joss Whedon and/or Drew Goddard, then you should have a small idea of what you're in for. The entire film can be spoiled in as little as one sentence or even a few words, so don't let anyone spoil it for you. The humor is sharp witted much like most of Whedon's work. The Marty character is especially hilarious. The film is so aware of the horror films it borrows from and pays tribute to and it makes fun of that fact whenever it starts to go down a similar path. It's kind of like the concept of Scream only smarter.

It's when the college students make their way down into the cellar is when things get legendary; a bold word to use perhaps but the film earns it on more than one occasion. That's all you're getting out of me as far as the storyline is concerned. This is one instance of mindblowing that deserves every opportunity to surprise and excite you. The score is just as extravagant as the film, as well. When it first begins, it's subtle and creepy. It's slow rising and a lot like what you'd expect a horror movie score to be. As things pick up though, the score becomes more triumphant and blaring. Everything is so loud and screams to be seen and heard on the best sound and video devices you can get your hands on.

The Evil Dead and Evil Dead II are the films you'll hear this compared to the most, but there were shades of Friday the 13th in there as well. The blood and gore deliver in spades, especially in the final act. You practically feel like buckets of blood have been dumped directly into your lap by the time Trent Reznor is screaming at you during the ending credits. But let's talk about that final act for a moment. You have an idea of where the film is going leading up to that point. The Cabin in the Woods is telling this story from two different angles and you think you have everything figured out. But then that one scene happens. If you've seen the film, you know exactly what I'm talking about; where everything hits the fan. My jaw was on the floor and I had goosebumps all over my body. This is why I go to the movies. This is why I love horror; to experience something like this.

The Cabin in the Woods doesn't reinvent the horror genre, but it does completely manipulate it in a way that is just so freaking spectacular that you won't know what to do with yourself. If this was the last horror movie to ever grace the silver screen I would be completely content with that. The full-length horror movie era can begin with The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari in 1920 and end with The Cabin in the Woods in 2012, as far as I'm concerned. My brain was turned inside out and I was never so happy to have that sensation after viewing a film. Brilliant, terrifying, and fantastically imaginative, The Cabin in the Woods makes you feel like your brain explodes during its duration and you're left piecing it back together like Humpty Dumpty after the credits. Sensational doesn't even begin to describe how superb this film really is.
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189 of 233 people found the following review helpful
With geek god Joss Whedon (creator of TV's Buffy and Firefly among other fan favorites) on board, it's fair to say that the expectations for "The Cabin in the Woods" were quite high for enthusiasts of the horror genre. Here he shares a writing credit with the film's director Drew Goddard and the result is one of the year's more entertaining experiments. I truly think that this is a film that will suffer due to those that are willing to discuss too many of the plot points in advance, so I'll be brief in my actual descriptions. I will say this, though, the less you know about the movie--the more fun you can have. In my opinion, even the advertising campaign and trailers hint at too much. You know from the start that this isn't your typical fright fest. Instead, what is served plays up and skewers every horror movie cliche imaginable. It is both hip and witty, as well as smarter than it has any right to be. It twists movie conventions around in clever new ways and makes something that seems remarkably fresh and different. And if you're a fan of horror movies, this is simply fun, fun, fun.

Of course, we all know the genre of movies that involve a cabin in the woods (or other appropriately desolate place). Let's get a car full of kids, strand them, and then start picking them off in increasingly creative ways. At the start, that's exactly the scenario that "The Cabin in the Woods" sets up. We meet five standard character archetypes for these type of films: the jock (Chris Hemsworth), the stoner (Fran Kranz), the good girl (Kristen Connolly), the vixen (Anna Hutchison) , and the scholar (Jesse Williams). After a brief bit of character introduction, we're off to the woods. As they settle in, each rises to their individual stereotype. First there's drunken revelry, then there's the discovery of a very spooky basement, and then mayhem ensues. What's going on and can anyone survive? If you've seen the trailers, however, (and if not, this is also included as the first scenes in the movie) you know that there is something more complex at work behind the scenes. But that's all you get from me. Let's just say that the film turns into a post-modern game as much as a traditional horror endeavor.

The film really works on several levels. It's funny without being overly precious. It always knowingly involves the audience in its sense of gamesmanship. The fact that we have more information than the characters (but not everything, of course) makes us complicit in an enjoyable voyeuristic experience. And yet, there are plenty of scares and surprises in store. "The Cabin in the Woods" has relatively moderate goals, it just wants to put on a good show. The ending pushes quite far and is deliriously over-the-top. It may not stand up to much intellectual scrutiny, but I didn't care. I was just along for the ride. This may not necessarily be considered among the "best" movies of the year, but it is easily one of the more entertaining ones. And in that way, Whedon and Goddard have honored horror movie fans everywhere. For sheer entertainment, about 4 1/2 stars. KGHarris, 5/12.

Bonus Features Include:
Commentary with writer/director Drew Goddard & writer/producer Joss Whedon
"We Are Not Who We Are: Making The Cabin in the Woods" Documentary
"The Secret Secret Stash" Featurette with "Marty's Stash" & "Hi, My name is Joss and I'll be your guide"
Wonder-Con appearance with Whedon and Goddard
"An Army of Nightmares: Make-Up & Animatronic Effects" featurette
"Primal Terror: Visual Effects" featurette
"It's Not What You Think: The Cabin in the Woods" Bonus View Mode (For Blu-ray Only)
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29 of 33 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon September 26, 2012
In the world of filmmaking, genres must occasionally be reinvented; otherwise they become predictable and stale. In the late 90's, West Craven reinvigorated the horror genre with "Scream," by combining sly self-awareness and humor with genuine scares. Not since "Scream" has a mainstream film come along and reinvented the horror genre like "The Cabin in the Woods".

The film begins with two opposing and intertwined storylines. One is the oldest cliché in the world - 5 attractive college students decide to head off to a cabin in the woods for a weekend of fun, sex, and substance abuse. It's a surprise to no one that terror, bloodletting, and death await them. But there's another storyline happening; where a group of corporate drones are watching the youngsters on TV screens, anticipating their actions as if they're producers making a reality show. If that were the case, then the film would hardly be fresh and original. Tying reality TV to horror has been done many times in recent years. So what, exactly, is really going on with the workers watching the kids, and why does their fate alternately amuse, entertain, and terrify them?

To give anything else away would be a crime, because the best thing about this film is its unpredictability. If you think you know what's coming ... you don't. Lots of films and television shows try so hard to shock, titillate, or surprise their audience that the tactics just come across as empty and manipulative, but "The Cabin in the Woods" has genuinely new, fresh ideas that it executes expertly.

I will give one thing away ... the ending of this film offers no possibility for a sequel. So as an added bonus, fans of the film won't have to watch a fresh, original piece of filmmaking turn into a redundant franchise.
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19 of 23 people found the following review helpful
With geek god Joss Whedon (creator of TV's Buffy and Firefly among other fan favorites) on board, it's fair to say that the expectations for "The Cabin in the Woods" were quite high for enthusiasts of the horror genre. Here he shares a writing credit with the film's director Drew Goddard and the result is one of the year's more entertaining experiments. I truly think that this is a film that will suffer due to those that are willing to discuss too many of the plot points in advance, so I'll be brief in my actual descriptions. I will say this, though, the less you know about the movie--the more fun you can have. In my opinion, even the advertising campaign and trailers hint at too much. You know from the start that this isn't your typical fright fest. Instead, what is served plays up and skewers every horror movie cliche imaginable. It is both hip and witty, as well as smarter than it has any right to be. It twists movie conventions around in clever new ways and makes something that seems remarkably fresh and different. And if you're a fan of horror movies, this is simply fun, fun, fun.

Of course, we all know the genre of movies that involve a cabin in the woods (or other appropriately desolate place). Let's get a car full of kids, strand them, and then start picking them off in increasingly creative ways. At the start, that's exactly the scenario that "The Cabin in the Woods" sets up. We meet five standard character archetypes for these type of films: the jock (Chris Hemsworth), the stoner (Fran Kranz), the good girl (Kristen Connolly), the vixen (Anna Hutchison) , and the scholar (Jesse Williams). After a brief bit of character introduction, we're off to the woods. As they settle in, each rises to their individual stereotype. First there's drunken revelry, then there's the discovery of a very spooky basement, and then mayhem ensues. What's going on and can anyone survive? If you've seen the trailers, however, (and if not, this is also included as the first scenes in the movie) you know that there is something more complex at work behind the scenes. But that's all you get from me. Let's just say that the film turns into a post-modern game as much as a traditional horror endeavor.

The film really works on several levels. It's funny without being overly precious. It always knowingly involves the audience in its sense of gamesmanship. The fact that we have more information than the characters (but not everything, of course) makes us complicit in an enjoyable voyeuristic experience. And yet, there are plenty of scares and surprises in store. "The Cabin in the Woods" has relatively moderate goals, it just wants to put on a good show. The ending pushes quite far and is deliriously over-the-top. It may not stand up to much intellectual scrutiny, but I didn't care. I was just along for the ride. This may not necessarily be considered among the "best" movies of the year, but it is easily one of the more entertaining ones. And in that way, Whedon and Goddard have honored horror movie fans everywhere. For sheer entertainment, about 4 1/2 stars. KGHarris, 5/12.
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92 of 120 people found the following review helpful
on September 22, 2012
I can't believe some people are giving this movie a 1..even 2's. Hello!? This movie was amazing. Probably one of the most original, UNPREDICIBLE movies I've seen in a really long time(And I've seen many). Its funny that people are saying this movie is predictable and boring because there's no way you can guess whats going to happen. Its never been done before. Its funny, gory, and you'll probably jump a few times without this movie being cheesy or stupid. Not too scary, but the unique-ness of this story makes up for it. definately go see it!
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57 of 76 people found the following review helpful
It's not fair to call CABIN IN THE WOODS a horror movie, although it wears the disguise of one. Instead, it's a very smart parody of one, made both to wink at and make fun of the horror movie audiences that have evolved over the years. Don't think it's mean-spirited, either. The film is a helluva a lot of fun, and even though the ending is very obviously thumbing its nose at the audience, it would've completely cheapened the whole movie if it had ended in any other way.

I shouldn't really be talking about the ending. I don't want to give anything away, after all. Although, with this film, talking about nearly any part of it is giving something very important away. Instead, I'll focus on the two elements that the movie poster, the trailer, and even the title provide.

The set-up is common and obvious, in a nothing-up-my-sleeves sort of way. A stoner, jock, nerd (barely qualifies), slut, and virgin (also barely qualifies) go on a weekend trip to a spooky cabin in the woods. This premise is pretty basic, and really the only element that changes is what horror awaits them. At the same time that these young victims are placed in a typical horror movie setting, they are being watched by people who are in a far less typical horror movie setting.

The metaphors for the audience are hard to miss. Viewers of the film are turned into characters within the film, and the end result is a film that gratifies an audience's less unique horror movie needs while also turning the whole thing into a brilliant analysis of itself, an analysis that's hilarious on-screen, but which also stuck with me for days after I'd watched the film. The power of a horror film is to take a specific moment and magnify the mortality of it so that viewers can't help but sympathize; it's about taking one person's fear of death and making it everyone's. This fact is the basis for this film's entire set up as well as its snarky, all-hell-breaks-loose ending.

The point being that you will laugh far more than you will scream or shudder. It might have been possible for them to have made the film as scary as it is fun, but I don't think it was necessary or even advisable. This film's greatest strength is not just in its excellently acted players, its multi-tiered plotting, or its sharp and brisk dialogue. Mostly, it is in its hilariously creative navel-gazing.
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12 of 15 people found the following review helpful
on May 2, 2012
I'm a huge horror buff. Horror and thriller movies are the core of my interests, with the occasional comedy sneaking in there. I went into this movie not knowing much about it; believing it was a straight up horror flick (which was a GENIUS move in advertising this movie). So I settled down in the movie theatre wanting to have a few jumps and starts, but I ended up laughing my ass off the whole time. It's corny, campy in a good way, and just doesn't stop with gag after gag. This movie is hilarious, and I'm glad I went into it blind. I was much much more receptive to the humor by not even expecting it.

A must for quirky, campy fun. I will watch this movie over and over again.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
The title of my review says it all. The less you know about Cabin in the Woods going into it, the more surprised you're going to be. Simply put, if you're a fan of horror movies, ignore reading up on anything about it, and take a risk by going into it with no expectations. That's how I watched the movie, and I can tell you with 100% honesty that Cabin in the Woods is one of the best movies I've watched in the last couple of years. I can see why it was so hard to market, and why it sat on the shelf for as long as it did (check out how Chris Hemsworth looks here, not long before he starred in Thor). This section of my review right here is going to get the main things out of the way, with the next paragraph being my usual format with the plot summary. But please, just stop reading and watch it! The only reason I'm giving it 4 out of 5 stars instead of 5, since I did just say it's one of the best movies I've seen in a while, is because despite all the new things the film does, it takes a standard way out towards the end and starts to become just another horror movie. As weird as it sounds to praise something that goes this way, it still works, and I was only let down that they didn't keep the original pace up all the way through. That and some not-even-good-for-the-year-it-came-out CG are the two things holding it back. Even then, I enjoyed watching Cabin in the Woods and didn't want it to end, and I even wanted a couple of sequels given the variety of ways things could have gone.

Alright, if you HAVE to know about the plot (man, I warned you)...Cabin in the Woods starts out with two men in a big business who are part of something big. They set up scenarios all over the world that are essentially what you see in horror movies. In Japan, a school for girls is haunted by a ghost in the class room, and they have cameras set up to show the whole thing. It turns out that these guys are part of something even bigger, and these situations are going on for a reason, though we don't find out what it is until much later. One of their main "shows" involves 5 college kids who go off to a cabin in the woods for a weekend in order to kick back and get off the grid, so to speak. You have the virgin, the jock, the...*ahem* cheerleader-type, the geek and the stoner. The funny thing is, all of these guys are friends and get along perfectly, not showing any signs of those labels until they get to the cabin. The jock dude isn't even a "bro" type- he's a great student! When they make it to the cabin, the guys back at the corporation get the gears going. They control a lot of elements about the scenario, but it's still up to the kids to decide on what to do. Different types of gases are used to change how their decision-making, voices will echo with advice on what to do next, and a trap door to the cellar opens up unexpectedly when the kids are all just kicking back in the living room. Of course they go down to inspect, and find a treasure trove of oddities. A puzzle sphere of sorts, a music box, an old diary, masks, a conch shell...the list goes on. Each of the kids is about to do something with what they pick up, but it's a special phrase in the diary that gets read out loud and activates which terror comes to the cabin- an undead family.

As soon as the undead family is announced, and one of the two main guys in the company expresses his disappointment because he really wanted to see a mermaid kill the kids, that should tell you about the tone of the movie. Think of how From Dusk Till Dawn was two movies in one- the first half being crime and the second half being horror. Well, here it's horror mixed with comedy, with most of the comedy coming from the guys pulling off what's essentially their own horror movie. I loved it when the film would switch over to the workers in their lab, taking bets on what was going to happen next. When we see the list of all the monsters that could have been let loose, it brings to mind a whole bunch of ideas on what could have happened. Cabin in the Woods could almost be a kind of Choose Your Own Adventure movie, with even more potential for sequels if they showed the footage from other places int the world like that Japanese classroom. When the kids start to get killed off, it's kind of sad for once, because these aren't just plain dumb kids. We can see that for the most part, there's no way out of this trap, and they're helpless. And yet we cut over to the guys partying about how they're winning the bets, and it's easy to forget about the victims because this cast here is so damn likable!

Honestly, I don't want to say much more about the movie. Horror films don't do a whole lot for me for various reasons (mainly because I saw two huge ones as a kid and nothing since then has scared me even in the slightest). Cabin in the Woods isn't scary at all, but instead just a very interesting film to watch play out. Very rarely do I go back and watch movies after I've seen them the first time. This is one of the exceptions where I'd gladly sit down with people who haven't seen it before and watch it again with them.
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15 of 20 people found the following review helpful
EDIT: I'm enjoying getting to know the cross-section of the people who loved this film and the people who hated it here on Amazon. A lot of the positive reviews are well-written with proper spelling and punctuation. The one-star/two-star reviews are mostly "LOL THIS movie TOTALLY RETARD". Kinda makes you think, doesn't it?

Onto the film though. It is almost impossible to talk about how unbelievably awesome THE CABIN IN THE WOODS is without spoiling it. There's so much that goes on within the film that is incredibly important to how special, unique and flat-out brilliant the concept of this film is that to write a review of it without giving those parts away, so I won't even try. And there are enough reviews that go into non-spoiler territory about the specifics, so mostly I write this to share my thoughts.

Sadly, because of the seeming disconnect between the critical raves for this film and the target audience for this film, this film was something of a box-office failure (it really underperformed), but I can practially guarantee that this film will have the most rabid cult horror following since the EVIL DEAD films.

This is where marketing a film poorly can make or break a film based on how it's presented. Watching the commercials and trailers, it focuses strictly on the horror elements that the film is, at least in part, thumbing its nose at. When the walls of the mystery break down further and further as the remaining characters go further down the rabbit hole, this becomes less of a horror film and more of a forced examination of the tropes of the entire horror genre. Marketing the film this way, on the more gore and sex aspects of the film, will get casual horror fans in the door, but with a CinemaScore of C (D+ amongst females) and a Rotten Tomatoes score of 93% at the time of its release in March 2012 (as of right now, in October of 2012, it's fallen to a 91%...), there seems to be a massive difference in what true fans of the genre who tend to look at things with a more critical eye and casual moviegoers are seeing in this film. This was also indicitive of myself and my wife seeing the film. I loved it; my wife, someone who casually enjoys Whedon's work and is more of a casual moviegoer, did not love it.

It's very rare to see this kind of disconnect. Usually with genre films, if the critics enjoy it, most moviegoers will enjoy it too. However it's Roger Ebert who stated it best in his review, calling this film "a fanboy's final exam". That is very true of THE CABIN IN THE WOODS. While this is a film that is meant to entertain all, it is much more aimed at the moviegoers who are fed up with the horror genre and the constant recycling of films, whether they are the endless parade of sequels, witless retcons, and a slew of American remakes of Japanese Horror films (which this film HILARIOUSLY satirizes in a small but important subplot).

It's also important to realize that this film was originally made back in 2009, and was in pre-production when many of the horror films coming out were of the so-called "torture porn" sub-genre as well as sequels to remakes and sequels to Americanized remakes, but it's remarkable how timely this film still is. Many of the trappings of modern horror cinema have extended to the current market to the point of unintentional parody, and now, we have them with the "benefit" of 3D, which unless the film is shot in 3D, looks terrible by all accounts when it's post-converted, and is a trend that I am very surprised that hasn't died out yet. So with all of this going on, there was a lot for horror fans like Whedon and Goddard to hate.

EDIT: I realized that I haven't talked too much about the technical and artisan-style prowess of the filmmakers. Joss Whedon is a one-of-a-kind. There's a reason that people refer to his style of dialogue as "Joss-Speak". It's incredibly witty and whip-smart. He's absolutely not a lowest-common-denominator writer. The idea of these kids, who are all intelligent despite how the events in the film conspire to make them into cliches, having all of this wit is a little hyper-realistic, and that's part of the nature of Joss-Speak. It's like David Mamet, and no, I'm not comparing the two as artists, but the nature of their dialogue requires a certain ear. Most people who find this film's dialogue awful are not familiar with Whedon as a creative force, and it can be a little grating if you're hearing it for the first time. Drew Goddard is from the Whedon School if you will, being weaned on shows like BUFFY and ANGEL, and then moving on to shows like LOST and films like CLOVERFIELD. As a co-writer, you can tell that these two have a rhythm that compliment each other. Goddard is also a surprisingly good director. He knows more than enough on how he needed to construct this film in order to get the maximum impact, whether for the scarier or the funnier or the more human moments. The creature effects are largely loving tributes to many great creatures of the history of horror. Many of them are surprisingly done practically as opposed to using primarily CGI (with a few obvious exceptions). And for those of you who have seen it, I just have one word for you: Unicorn.

It's important to understand that I am personally not a fanboy of horror films. I love a great horror film that transcends the genre. I love Carpenter's THE THING, Cronenberg's THE FLY, Landis's AN AMERICAN WEREWOLF IN LONDON, Friedkin's THE EXORCIST (and THE EXORCIST III), Romero's NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD and so on. For me, the last great horror films I saw were Frank Darabont's THE MIST (2007) and Tomas Alfredson's LET THE RIGHT ONE IN (2009). Before that, it was Neil Marshall's THE DESCENT in 2006. That's three really great horror films in the course of four years (unless you consider CLOVERFIELD a horror film, which I don't). After that came a whole lotta nothin'; at least until THE CABIN IN THE WOODS.

The film that this is getting the most comparison to is Wes Craven's SCREAM and that franchise. It's mainly for two reasons: First is because of the cleverness and wit of the horror tale told within, and second is because of how 'meta' both of these films are. I know that 'meta' is a term that gets thrown around quite a bit in genre entertainment right now, and is as easily applicable to this film as well as the films of the SCREAM franchise. These are films where the horror doesn't just stay within the film, but the films are about horror films as well. SCREAM ushered in, for at least a while, a great metatextual discussion about the tropes of the slasher sub-genre and the idea of the sequel. While the conversation continued throughout the third and fourth films, the quality decreased once the third film hit. Both THE CABIN IN THE WOODS and the SCREAM franchise clearly love the horror genre but both felt that things had continued for too long in the same direction and something so new had to come along. SCREAM came along right at the right time, and you could feel its influence in so many other horror films that came after. THE CABIN IN THE WOODS, judging by its lack of opening weekend success and its failure to generate the positive word-of-mouth it would've needed to compete with films like THE HUNGER GAMES due to false expectations, will likely not have the same cultural impact amongst the audience and the studios as SCREAM did, and there are a few reasons for this, but the main reason is that this film's only real fault is being too ambitious.

While I don't think that's actually a fault, it's currently a reason of another big disconnect between great filmmaking and great box-office. Most people would rather have a double cheeseburger than try a new restaurant, and sometimes that's fine. I like a good double cheeseburger too. The problem, though, is just being satisfied with the same recycled fast-food entertainment over and over, because the market does dictate what things we see and read and consume. Too often, some of the most talented voices in the creative world are silenced before they're every really exposed, and it has more to do with the mass market not being ready for it yet or that people are threatened by the idea of something truly smart. I think films like EVIL DEAD 2 are films that challenge the expectations of the audience watching it and there are those that are in on it, and those that aren't. If EVIL DEAD 2 hadn't gained the following it got on home video, there never would have been ARMY OF DARKNESS five years later, which for a sequel to EVIL DEAD 2, was a pretty successful film. SCREAM is a different animal altogether because it was a great film and it made a lot of money, and by all reason, it shouldn't have. It was more of a confluence of events that made it the blockbuster it was. I'd be very interested to see how this film might have fared back during its original intended release in 2009, because, while not doomed to obscurity, it quickly faded due to the One-Two Punch of THE HUNGER GAMES and Joss Whedon's other brilliant film, THE AVENGERS, hit theaters.

During and after the film, I was buzzing with energy and felt something akin to cinematic bliss. And it certainly doesn't hurt that the song playing over the end credits is Nine Inch Nails' "Last", which is the most creative and appropriate use of a NIN song in a film ever (and that includes songs that Trent wrote for films and SE7EN). I knew I had just seen a film that was probably the most entertaining and most invigorating film I had seen in quite some time, and at the same time, I knew that like myself and my wife, it would be polarizing amongst audiences. But what Whedon and Goddard do with this film is frame a debate amongst horror fans, and it's the most exciting debate to have: Do you hope that something different will come along that will try and test your preconceptions about the horror genre, or are you satisfied with the way things are?

Many people who come into this film blind, expecting a horror film and are genre fans who are looking for the cinematic equivalent of a quickie ("Give me some boobs, some creative kills and some decent jump scares and I'm good for the night.") are going to be either furious or perplexed. I've found that the people who are supporting this film are more of the "I Love Film" club, because understanding the power Cinema has, you're just falling in love with how effortlessly this film shatters everything you think it would be and instead takes you into a world where anything can, and does happen.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on January 15, 2013
I am not a true fan of the horror genre, but this one intrigued me. I suspected from the trailers that it wasn't your usual slice 'em and dice 'em horror flick, so I got it and watched it - twice.

For me, what made the difference was the story. It actually had one. And it was quite ingenious as well. There were a few holes in it, like how did they really get this cabin in the first place, but when a story is good, I can always suspend belief. The entertainment industry as a whole, often forces us to suspend belief in many movies and shows. If I start telling the story here, I will give away too much of the treats this movie dishes out from the beginning. Let me just say, it is horror, so if blood and gore is not your thing, you probably won't like this one. But, if you aren't put off by it, there are juicy rewards at the end of this movie that separates it from the rest of the mindless horror flicks out there.

I recommend this with the caveat that you aren't squeamish and easily frightened. It is that rare horror movie that is actually entertaining, with a good story overall. It won't win awards, but it is surprisingly satisfying for a genre loaded with bad movies. I really liked it. Good cast, smart script, decent acting, and worth paying for if you are in the mood for an hour and a half or so of escapism entertainment. Great popcorn movie with friends! Not for the under 16 crowd, though. Keep the kiddies away from this one. Definitely adult fun here!
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