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Cache of Corpses Hardcover – November 27, 2007


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Forge Books; First Edition edition (November 27, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 076531780X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0765317803
  • Product Dimensions: 6.2 x 1.1 x 8.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,400,507 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Deputy Stephen Martinez, who makes an appealing laid-back philosopher-detective, gets on the case in Kisor's delightful encore to Season's Revenge . . . . Sharp-witted dialogue, rustic ambience and intriguing, character-driven tangents will keep readers turning the pages."--Publisher's Weekly
 
"Strong characters, warm confident prose."--Kirkus Reviews
 
"Beautiful, rural Michigan is the backdrop for this captivating mystery, which boasts an eminently likeable protagonist.  Kisor ... has a lyrical writing style that's perfect for this well-constructed novel." --Romantic Times BOOKReviews

About the Author

HENRY KISOR is the recently retired book editor and literary columnist for the Chicago Sun-Times from 1978 to 2006. He is also the author of Season's Revenge and A Venture into Murder, also featuring Deputy Steve Martinez. Kisor lives in Evanston, Illinois.

Customer Reviews

The characters are well developed and the stories are fascinating.
Robert D. Shoop
It's a fun if stomach-churning tale, and I'd pick up another book by this author to see how he solves the next one.
Zinta Aistars
By this point, Martinez must have long-dismissed the myth that Porcupine county is a quiet place to live!
Daniel W. Hays

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Cory D. Slipman on January 13, 2008
Format: Hardcover
Henry Kisor in his third book of a series takes great pride in the description of his setting for "Cache of Corpses", Porcupine County in the picturesque and bucolic Upper Peninsula of Michigan. His protagonist Deputy Sheriff Steve Martinez has both personal and professional issues which impact his existence. Martinez, a Lakota Indian by birth is considered an outsider despite living in Porcupine for more than 10 years, against a backdrop of a mostly Caucasian populace. His relationship with wealthy local widow Ginny Fitzgerald is being put to the test when she decides to adopt a 12 year old orphaned native American boy Tommy Standing Bear.

Martinez has plenty on his plate as he's unofficially assuming the job of Sheriff Eli Garrow. Garrow a deep rooted denizen of Porcupine City has taken an unauthorized sabbatical refusing to go back to work. Martinez was presently campaigning against Garrow for the sheriff's job in the upcoming local election.

With all the pressure on Martinez's head a spate of corpses have been turning up with alarming regularity in the territory under his jurisdiction. The corpses are medical cadavers but when one appears to be a homicide victim, the investigation goes into high gear.

This rash of cadavers we learn is part of a game originated in an internet chat room that combines the macabre with the latest in global positioning devices in a weird scavenger type hunt.

Kisor's plot is creative and he endows a sense of plausibility to his characters especially Martinez who must juggle his personal problems which are becoming compounded by virtue of his investigation.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Robert D. Shoop on September 20, 2009
Format: Hardcover
As the author of Peril on the Katy Trail researching information for a possible future novel set at 14 Mile Point near Ontonagon, MI I was surprised to find that another author had set the conclusion of his novel at that same location. So I obtained a copy of Cache of Corpses and also the first two novels in the series by Henry Kisor, Season's Revenge: A Christmas Mystery and A Venture Into Murder. My surprise evolved to pleasant.
I do not know if I will ever write a novel set in northern Michigan, but I do know that I thoroughly enjoy the novels in this mystery series by Henry Kisor. The characters are well developed and the stories are fascinating.
Cache of Corpses can stand alone if beginning to read there. However, I do recommend starting with Season's Revenge as the first in the series. The maturation of the main character is a classic.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Roger L. Conlee on February 18, 2008
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Once again Henry Kisor comes up with an inventive, nicely plotted story featuring his well-crafted protagonist, Deputy Steve Martinez. The pacing and tone are excellent. Kisor gives us another vivid, charming look at the remote Upper Peninsula of Michigan, not a place where one would expect dead bodies galore to start turning up.

Roger L. Conlee (author of "Counterclockwise" and "Every Shape, Every Shadow")
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By snipercritic on January 2, 2008
Format: Hardcover
I've now read the three books in this series. Each of them does a very good job inducing the reader to enjoy the context of the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. The first was good; the second better; this new one is even better. My conclusion about this book being the strongest -- and a good indication that the series will continue to improve -- is that the plot is the thickest and most interesting (in my view), there are no odd or predictable developments, and the overall package provides a fine mix of police procedural, local color, and characters you will care about. With that said, I think the reader who enjoys such books should start at the beginning but not be disappointed if the first two books are not perfect. Highly recommended.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Zinta Aistars on December 19, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
When I recently remarked to a writer-friend who writes a mystery series based in Michigan's Upper Peninsula, "But you're the only one who writes about the U.P., right?," he gave me a long, meaningful gaze. You know, the kind of gaze that makes you realize you've just said something really *stoopid*. So I did some online researching. Yeah. I did say something *stoopid*.

I got a list of U.P. authors, a very long list, I might add, and among them was Henry Kisor. My writer-friend had recommended Kisor, so I browsed through some electronic versions of his books, and chose this one, Cache of Corpses. It is one of a series about a detective named Steve Martinez, a Lakota Sioux by birth, now living in the very small town called Porcupine City, in the area near the Porcupine Mountains of the U.P.

The story opens like this:

"It's in the Dying Room," Jenny Benson said, voice strained, ample chest heaving. "And it has no head."

Oh boy, I thought, coming in with a slam, and didn't wait a moment to add that stereotypical detective mystery bit with a heaving ample chest. Suppressing an eye roll (hard to read that way), I settled in for the read to see where it would take me.

After a bit of a clumsy start, I became genuinely interested in the story. Not my genre, even as I am a fan of most all things U.P., and it didn't have the delicious tang of humor I'd found in the Woods Cop series by Joe Heywood, but I appreciated the cast of northern wilderness characters and the mix of woods politics--detective Martinez is running for deputy sheriff at the time that a string of murders takes place, leaving a cache of headless, handless corpses wrapped in plastic and hidden as if on scavenger hunt for a group of weird, sociopathic geocaching game-players.
Read more ›
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More About the Author

Henry Kisor is the retired book editor of the Chicago Sun-Times as well as the author of three nonfiction books and six mystery novels. He is also the co-author of one children's book.

He is the author of a series of mystery novels set in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, Season's Revenge (2003), A Venture into Murder (2005), Cache of Corpses (2007),] Hang Fire (2013), and Tracking the Beast (2015). A fifth novel, The Riddle of Billy Gibbs, is forthcoming in 2016.

His nonfiction works are What's That Pig Outdoors?: A Memoir of Deafness (1990 and 2010), Zephyr: Tracking a Dream Across America (1994) and Flight of the Gin Fizz: Midlife at 4,500 Feet (1997).

His books have been published abroad in German, Dutch and United Kingdom editions.

He writes two blogs, The Reluctant Blogger and The Whodunit Photographer.
He was the book editor of the Chicago Sun-Times from 1978 to his retirement in 2006, after five years in the same position with the old Chicago Daily News.

His reviews and articles have appeared in the New York Times Book Review, the Los Angeles Times, the Washington Post and on MSNBC.com. Between 1977 and 1982 he was an adjunct instructor at Northwestern University's Medill School of Journalism. From 1983 to 1986 he wrote a weekly syndicated column on personal computers that appeared in the Chicago Sun-Times, Los Angeles Herald-Examiner, Orlando Sentinel, Seattle Times and other newspapers.

He was named a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize for Criticism in 1981. The Friends of Literature awarded him the first James Friend Memorial Critic Award in 1988 and the Chicago Foundation for Literature Award for Nonfiction in 1991 for What's That Pig Outdoors? In 1991 Trinity College awarded him a honorary Doctor of Letters degree. In 2001 he was inducted into the Chicago Journalism Hall of Fame.

Educated at Trinity College (B.A., 1962) in Hartford, Conn., and at Northwestern University (M.S.J., 1964) in Evanston, Ill., Kisor began his newspaper career in 1964 with the Evening Journal in Wilmington, Del.

He winters in Evanston, Illinois, and summers in Ontonagon, Michigan, with his wife, Deborah Abbott. They have two grown sons, Colin, an attorney with the U.S. Department of Justice (m. Melody Pershyn), and Conan, a corporate communications editor and writer for the Boeing Company (m. Annie Tully). They also have two grandsons, William Henry Kisor and Conan Emmet Kisor; two granddaughters, Elizabeth Maria Kisor and Alice Flynn Kisor.