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Call Me Kuchu


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Product Details

  • Actors: David Kato
  • Directors: Katherine Fairfax Wright, Malika Zouhali-Worrall
  • Format: Multiple Formats, Closed-captioned, Color, NTSC, Widescreen
  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: English
  • Dubbed: Swahili
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.85:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: NR (Not Rated)
  • Studio: DOCURAMA
  • DVD Release Date: September 24, 2013
  • Run Time: 87 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00BYOQADW
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #90,040 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Editorial Reviews

Product Description

In Uganda, a new bill threatens to make homosexuality punishable by death. David Kato, Uganda s first openly gay man, and retired Anglican Bishop Christopher Senyonjo work against the clock to defeat state-sanctioned homophobia while combatting vicious persecution in their daily lives. But no one is prepared for the brutal murder that shakes their movement to its core and sends shock waves around the world.

In an unmarked office at the end of a dirt track, veteran activist David Kato labors to repeal Uganda s homophobic laws and liberate his fellow lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender men and women, or kuchus. But David s formidable task just became much more difficult. A new Anti-Homosexuality Bill proposes death for HIV-positive gay men, and prison for anyone who fails to turn in a known homosexual. Inspired by American evangelicals who have christened Uganda ground zero in their war on the homosexual agenda, the bill awaits debate in Uganda s Parliament.

While most religious leaders in Uganda support the Bill, one lone voice from the Church is willing to speak out against it: Bishop Christopher Senyonjo, a purple-robed sage who has been expelled from the Anglican Church of Uganda for his theological defense of Uganda s LGBT community. Armed with a PhD in human sexuality and a thorough understanding of Biblical scripture, this octogenarian doggedly continues his work to establish a kuchu counseling center and safe house in Kampala.
Meanwhile, local newspapers have begun outing kuchus with vicious fervor under headlines such as: HOMO TERROR! We Name and Shame Top Gays in the City.

David, Uganda s first openly gay man, is one of the few who dare to publicly protest state-sanctioned homophobia. Working with an idiosyncratic clan of fellow activists, David fights Uganda s government and tabloids in the courts, on television, and at the United Nations. Because, he insists, if we keep on hiding, they will say we re not here.

But one year into filming CALL ME KUCHU and just three weeks after a landmark legal victory, the unthinkable happens: David is brutally murdered in his home. His death sends shock waves around the world, and leaves the Bishop and Kampala s kuchus traumatized and seeking answers for a way forward.

With unprecedented access, CALL ME KUCHU depicts the last year in the life of a courageous, quick-witted and steadfast man whose wisdom and achievements were not fully recognized until after his death, and whose memory has inspired a new generation of human rights advocates.

Review

The hardest work is done by local activists like those you will see in this film. To them I want to say: You are an inspiration to me… I am proud to join in this great human rights cause --UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon

Shocking, moving, enthralling and enraging --Time Out

Impressive and on the mark --Variety

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Mark Vaccarino on April 16, 2014
Format: Amazon Instant Video Verified Purchase
This is very sad that people are still being persecuted for who they are. The people of Africa should be ashamed.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By giovanni on December 8, 2013
Format: DVD
Uganda has in the last few years been in the news for all the wrong reasons . As the most homophobic country of Africa where the toxic influence of american evangelicals has certaintly produced "fruits" , the central african nation has almost reached a point of legal embrace of discrimination .

This documentary is simply heart braking . It's basic characters are David Kato , activist of LGTB rights , David Bahati, a politician who has penned and promoted the controversial law which brought the death penalty to people guilty of "homosexual acts" and Giles Muhame , publisher of the magazine Rolling Stone.( no relation to the american famous magazine ) which published articles shamelessly demonizing gay people and inciting hatred with tittles such as " Hang Them ! " ,
Ignorance thrives in the central african nation and we see players of public policy comparing it with Kleptomania . Articles full of conspirancy theories even suggest that islamist terrosties cooperate with gay people ( !?!? ) in order to hurt the country .
One could imagine that David Bahati could have been an even more ignorant version of your average tea-party republican if the US societal concept allowed him to fully materialize their beliefs yet any viewer would have a hard time finding a character as repulsive
as Muhame. David Kato himself was murdered during the filming of this so this documentary became unintentionally a biopic of the last months of his life . The most cold blooding moment comes when we see Muhame giggling about it the next day .

Even when the president of Uganda makes his appearance , by talking in a voice over ( " Hilary Clinton wanted to talk to me ..about GAYS !...President Obama called me ..about homosexuals !...
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By RobinLT on November 23, 2013
Format: Amazon Instant Video Verified Purchase
Heartbreaking but powerful. This film depicts recent Ugandan struggles over same-sex sexualities through centering the voices and perspectives of Ugandans. The film situates the Ugandan struggle in international context (US conservative Christian evangelicals & Western resistance to the 'Kill the Gays Bill') but rightly helps focuses on Uganda. Although I haven't yet seen it, Brett Davidson ([...]) suggests that "God Loves Uganda" is a good compliment as it focuses on the US story.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By T. Fortin on October 19, 2013
Format: Amazon Instant Video Verified Purchase
This documentary covers the rarely seen lives and struggle of gay africans and in this case the murderous colonialism of the American Evangelical movement.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By BluntReview on October 18, 2013
Format: DVD
Emily Blunt over at BluntReview (dot) com says: Watching Call Me Kuchu, you will want to check a calendar. In Uganda they have newspapers that use words of pure hate and propaganda - and they do it proudly. They want to sell newspapers, even if their articles, and images, cause the beatings and death of innocent men and women. You may get physically ill as the editor of the national paper called "Rolling Stone" (NO relation to the famous music mag) smiles and nervously smirks that he is doing right for his country folk.

The gay and lesbian issue has always seemed to divide people around the world, from many religious tendencies. Throwing verses out of a book(s) about there being something wrong with same sex coupling; each resource is usually thousands of years old and written with societal control of peoples at-the-time very uneducated, naturally media-free, career sheep herders or such, as its readership; or listeners as very few were schooled for fear of rising above their stations.

And, right now (as the review is typed) Uganda tried to pass into law - introduced in 2012 - to kill homosexuals, and imprison anyone who does not turn in a homosexual (even said person's own child).

Call Me Kuchu follows a few brave citizens who rallied against the would be law. They share their everyday horrors of being unaccepted and persecuted. Sadly, you watch Uganda only relent in the 24th hour due to being threatened by America, Canada and others that financial aid was going to be denied and the United Nations strongly warned the country of the human rights issue that could not be tolerated.

Human rights are a huge issue. In Uganda they are attacking homosexuals, in other areas women, or castes. Call Me Kuchu is a brave gritty unpolished shocker.
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