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A Call to Resurgence: Will Christianity Have a Funeral or a Future? Hardcover


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Product Details

  • Series: Resurgence
  • Hardcover: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Resurgence (November 5, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1414383622
  • ISBN-13: 978-1414383620
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 5.9 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.5 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (100 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #74,315 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Pastor Mark Driscoll is the founding pastor of Mars Hill Church in Seattle, Washington and is one of the world's most-downloaded and quoted pastors. His audience--fans and critics alike--spans the theological and cultural left and right. He was also named one of the "25 Most Influential Pastors of the Past 25 Years" by Preaching magazine, and his sermons are consistently #1 on iTunes each week for Religion & Spirituality with over 10 million of downloads each year.

Pastor Mark received a B.A. in Speech Communication from the Edward R. Murrow School of Communication at Washington State University, and he holds a masters degree in Exegetical Theology from Western Seminary in Portland, Oregon. He is the author of fifteen books.

In 1996, at the age of twenty-five, Pastor Mark and his wife, Grace, with the vision to make disciples of Jesus and plant churches, started a small Bible study at their home in Seattle, which at the time was the least churched city in America. Since that time, by God's grace, the church has exploded with upwards of nineteen thousand people meeting across thirteen locations in four states (Washington, Oregon, California, and New Mexico). Mars Hill has been recognized as the 54th largest, 30th fastest-growing, and 2nd most-innovative church in America by Outreach magazine.

Pastor Mark is the co-founder of the Acts 29 Network, which has planted over 400 churches in the US, in addition to thirteen other nations. He founded the Resurgence, which receives close to six million visits annually and services Christian leaders through books, blogs, conferences, and classes. And he is co-founder of Churches Helping Churches with Pastor James MacDonald, which raised over $2.7 million to help rebuild churches in Haiti and empower them minister and provide aide to the Haitian community, and helped deliver $1.7 million in medical supplies to the devastated country.

With a skillful mix of bold presentation, clear biblical teaching, and compassion for those who are hurting the most--in particular, women who are victims of sexual and physical abuse and assault--Driscoll has taken biblical Christianity into cultural corners previously unexplored by evangelicals. In the same year that he spoke at a Gospel Coalition conference with notable contemporary theologians like John Piper and Tim Keller, he also discussed biblical sexuality as a guest on Loveline with Dr. Drew, was featured on Nightline, and preached for Rick Warren at Saddleback Community Church.
--This text refers to the Audio CD edition.

More About the Author

Pastor Mark Driscoll is the founding pastor of Mars Hill Church, based in Seattle, Washington, and one of the most popular preachers in the world today.

In 2010, Preaching magazine named him one of the 25 most influential pastors of the past 25 years. Pastor Mark's online sermons are downloaded millions of times each year, he is the author of over 15 books, and he has also written for CNN, The Washington Post, The Seattle Times, and many other outlets.

With a skillful mix of bold presentation, accessible teaching, and compassion for those who are hurting the most--in particular, women who are victims of sexual and physical abuse and assault--Pastor Mark has taken biblical Christianity into cultural corners rarely explored by evangelicals. He has been grilled by Whoopi Goldberg and Barbara Walters on The View, gone head-to-head with Piers Morgan on CNN, debated the existence of evil with Deepak Chopra on ABC's Nightline, bantered with the gang on Fox and Friends, and explained biblical sexuality on Loveline with Dr. Drew.

Numerous ministries trace their roots to Pastor Mark's leadership. He is the founder of Resurgence, which offers resources for Christian leaders, including books, events, classes, multimedia, and a blog that welcomes 7 million visits annually. He is the cofounder of the Acts 29 Network, which has planted over 400 churches in the U.S. and over a dozen other nations. In 2010, following a cataclysmic earthquake in Haiti, Pastor Mark cofounded Churches Helping Churches with James MacDonald of Harvest Bible Chapel. The organization raised $2.7 million in funds and delivered an additional $1.7 million in medical supplies to the devastated country.

Born in North Dakota, Mark Driscoll grew up in south Seattle, the son of a union drywaller. After graduating from high school, he attended Washington State University on scholarship. He became a Christian during his freshman year, and finished college with a degree in speech communication from the Edward R. Murrow School of Communication. He later completed a master's degree in exegetical theology from Western Seminary in Portland, Oregon.

In 1996, at the age of 25, Pastor Mark and his wife, Grace, started a small Bible study at their home in Seattle, the least churched city in the U.S. at the time. By God's grace, Mars Hill Church grew beyond all expectations, and now gathers weekly across 15 locations in five states: Washington, Oregon, California, New Mexico, and Arizona. In 2012, Mars Hill was recognized as the third fastest growing and 28th largest church in the country by Outreach magazine.

Pastor Mark and Grace enjoy raising the "fab five" Driscoll kids, and he's grateful to be a nobody trying to tell everybody about Somebody.

Customer Reviews

At one point I actually stopped the recording to check that it wasn’t the author doing the narrating: always a good sign.
Trent M. Nicholson
Whereas chapters 1 and 2 dealt with the disintegration of our Christian society chapters 3 onward dealt with the different "tribes" we belong too.
Bartik14
I thought it was interesting when he discussed all the different type of Christian denominations there are and where they originated from.
Lisa A. Demaria

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

39 of 43 people found the following review helpful By George P. Wood TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on November 13, 2013
Format: Hardcover
I do not often read Mark Driscoll. I am neither a Calvinist nor a complementarian, as he is; and I don't appreciate his occasionally bombastic statements. But when a copy of his new book showed up in my mail box, I decided to give it a read.

A Call to Resurgence is a heartfelt plea to America's warring evangelical tribes to stop fighting about issues on which they disagree and to start uniting around issues on which they agree. Or rather, he encourages them to stop letting secondary doctrinal disputes get in the way of their primary evangelical mission. Those secondary doctrinal disputes include the debates between Calvinists and Arminians, between complementarians and evangelicals, between continuationists and cessationists, and between what he calls "missional" and "fundamental"--which is largely a debate about missiological strategy.

The reason for this heartfelt plea is twofold: First, one can be an evangelical Christian and belong to a mix-and-match of theological tribes. (Driscoll describes himself as Calvinist, complementarian, continuationist, and missional.) Second, North American culture is changing rapidly, and evangelical tribes need to stick together, both for survival and for mission.

A Call to Resurgence is a good book, though not a great one. I admire Driscoll as a church planter who has sown the seeds of the gospel in the very hard spiritual ground of Seattle, Washington. Though I am an Arminian, egalitarian, Pentecostal personally, I recognize Driscoll as a fellow evangelical and colaborer in the gospel. I found his social analysis and historical understanding to be a bit thin. But--and this is more important--his heart is in the right place.
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27 of 34 people found the following review helpful By BattleBornNV on November 5, 2013
Format: Hardcover
Great books are written and only few people take the time to read it. Not only read it, but critically think about it and review it. Some read the book and immediately put pen to paper and start casting a review either positive or negative, others read the book, put it down, think about it, read sections over and really dive into the mindset of the author, and finally write a review.

It has been over a week and a half since I finished Mark Driscoll’s newest book, A Call to Resurgence, and I must say that my opinion has changed since I have gone back and reviewed sections more than once. Up front my initial reaction was wow; he is tackling A LOT of different issues and must be ready for a whirlwind of controversy outside and inside of “Christian” communities/tribes. After my gut reaction I started to read deeper into what he is actually saying. Driscoll is calling out the Christians to unite on the main point, Jesus. The main point is for us to point to the main point.

Over the last six or seven years, I have learned from Pastor Mark and various ministries that is a part of. I respect what he has to say on different subjects and was eager to read this book. “In this book, Mark Driscoll delivers a wake-up call for every believer: We are living in a post-Christian culture—a culture fundamentally at odds with faith in Jesus. This is good and bad news. The good news is that God is still working, redeeming people from this spiritual wasteland and inspiring a resurgence of faithful believers. The bad news is that many believers just don’t get it. They continue to gather exclusively into insular tribes, lobbing e-bombs at each other in cyberspace.”

This book is divided and organized into seven chapters.
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22 of 29 people found the following review helpful By C. Dustin Boyd on November 28, 2013
Format: Hardcover
Controversial Resurgence leader Mark Driscoll’s new book is intended to be “a clarion call for every believer.” Driscoll wants believers to realize that we “are living in a post-Christian culture,” and that this involves “good and bad news. The good news is that God is still working . . . the bad news is that many believers just don’t get it.”

Driscoll sets the stage in the first chapter by telling his readers that “Christendom is dead.” He follows up in chapters two and three by describing how Christendom died (“How We Got Our Bell Rung”) and what has taken it’s place (“A New Reality”). It is in chapter three that Driscoll introduces his take on what he calls Christian “tribalism,” which he calls the “predominant culture” of evangelicalism (p. 86). Driscoll offers a broad definition of evangelicalism (pp. 95-96) and then uses four questions (“Are you Reformed or Arminian?”, “Are you complementarian or egalitarian?”, “Are you continuationist or cessationist?”, and “Are you missional or fundamental?”) to help believers identify which tribe they are a part of. In chapter four, Driscoll attempts to help his readers relate to and cooperate with believers in other tribes. These tribes, he says, are like “regions” within the larger “nation” of evangelical Christianity (pp. 118-119), and Christians must learn to unite with believers from other tribes around the essentials of the faith (p. 121). He then details these essentials with thirteen theses on topics running the gamut from Theology proper to Christian stewardship (pp. 123-136). Chapter five is dedicated to the Holy Spirit. This chapter is largely devoted to arguing for Driscoll’s own chastened form of Charismatic theology (though he prefers the term “Spirit empowered,” p. 157).
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