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Calling Crow Paperback – December 1, 1999


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: e-reads.com (December 1, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1585865745
  • ISBN-13: 978-1585865741
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 6.4 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.5 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (23 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #7,885,675 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Paul Clayton is the author of a three-book historical series on the Spanish Conquest of the Floridas-- Calling Crow, Flight of the Crow, and Calling Crow Nation (Putnam/Berkley), and a novel, Carl Melcher Goes to Vietnam (St. Martin’s Press), based on his own experiences in that war. Carl Melcher Goes to Vietnam was a finalist at the 2001 Frankfurt eBook Awards, along with works by Joyce Carol Oates (Faithless) and David McCullough (John Adams). Paul’s latest book-- White Seed: The Untold Story of the Lost Colony of Roanoke-- is a work of historical fiction. Paul currently lives in California, with his son and daughter. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

More About the Author

Paul Clayton is the author of a three-book historical series on the Spanish Conquest of the Floridas-- Calling Crow, Flight of the Crow, and Calling Crow Nation (Putnam/Berkley), and a novel, Carl Melcher Goes to Vietnam (St. Martin's Press), based on his own experiences in that war.

Carl Melcher Goes to Vietnam was a finalist at the 2001 Frankfurt eBook Awards, along with works by Joyce Carol Oates (Faithless) and David McCullough (John Adams).

Clayton's latest book-- White Seed: The Untold Story of the Lost Colony of Roanoke-- is a work of historical fiction.

Paul currently lives in California, with his son and daughter.



Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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This is a must-have for historical fiction fans.
Word Nerd
Clayton's his writing skills are superb as he winds a fascinating tale peopled with characters who are very real and very believable.
AuthorZone.Com Book Review
I couldn't put this book down, have finished the second book, and am off to buy the third.
Nancy B.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

24 of 24 people found the following review helpful By Sharon Maas (smaas@btinternet.com) on January 13, 2002
Format: Paperback
The moving story of Calling Crow is not only a pleasure to read, it brings history to life in vivid pictures and unforgetable scenes. The novel chronicles the adventures of the Chief of the peacuful Muskagee tribe, Calling Crow, who is captured by Spanish conquistadores. Calling Crow narrowly escapes death and is taken as a slave to Hispaniola, where further humiliations await him. He has no other option but to adapt to some of the Spanish ways, such as learning the language, and finds a particular friend in the gentle Spanish Priest. But all the time his inner rebellion is nourished by the need to return to his native village, and the woman he is betrothed to.
The story is told in part from Calling Crow's third person perspective, and partly from the perspective of various Spanish protagonists. I personally preferred the Calling Crow perspective; as I could immediately identify with him, feel the pain of his separation from his home village and the woman he loves, and his longing to return home. Clayton very competently lets us see the new world that is opening up tp Calling Crow through his own eyes; the Spanish wear "skins of metal" and they carry "thundersticks". When he first sees a horse he thinks it is a huge dog, and is terrified; at first I was not quite certain what a "jagged hill" was, until he began walking up it and I realised it was a staircase!
The novel is very competently written. Clayton does not divide the characters into the "good" natives and the "bad " Spaniards. He shows how many of the captured become weak and lethargic in captivity; not every one of them possesses Calling Crow's bravery, quick-wittedness and strength of character.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 15, 1996
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Set on the Southeast coast in the mid-16th century, this beautifully-written first novel tells the story of Calling Crow, a Muskogee Indian. The reader is reminded of modern tales of UFO alien abductions as Calling Crow is taken prisoner by men with metal skins (Spaniards). Imprisoned inside the strange cloudboat, Calling Crow is taken away. On the island of Hispaniola, he is baptized, brutalized, then forced to work in the silver pit mines. Along with the other slaves, Calling Crow sinks into despair and ill health. After repeated escape attempts, and on the verge of death, he is rescued by a kindly Spanish priest. With his new, limited freedom, Calling Crow learns the ways of the Spanish and plans his next escape. He meets and falls in love with another captive, Juana of the Arawak people. Finally, as part of a massive Spanish campaign to conquer the mainland of Florida, Calling Crow and Juana manage to slip away from their captors. Despite incredible odds, and after several years, Calling Crow makes his way back to his home village, bringing the novel to its startling conclusion.
Genre fiction that rises well above the pack. Compelling and thought provoking.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Oscar L. Vazquez on November 18, 2003
Format: Paperback
Calling Crow - a chief of a Muskogee tribe at what is now the sourtheast territory of USA - went to the coast to find out what were those rare cloudships seeing at the ocean and in a brutal way he made contact with the europeans who imprisoned, shipped him to Santo Domingo colony, enslaved and forced to work extracting gold from the rivers where he received hard punishment and humilliating treatment because of his resistence. Calling Crow dreams of freedom are fulfilled when he is taken to mainland continent again as a helper in a disastrous expedition to conquer Florida in the name of the Catholic King of Spain from where he escape and return to his tribe where he found resistence to believe everything he was telling about the Spaniards but also he had to run away to safe his life because unconscuously he brought diseases unknown to his tribes and decimate it.
This is a very interesting story that is narrated with a native point of view that express his reasoning about the clash of the cultures everything about the new civilization and religion and about everybody he meet in the colony, spaniards and captived indians, their way of thinking, believing and living.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By AuthorZone.Com Book Review on September 2, 2003
Format: Paperback
Calling Crow is tormented with persistent images of an obliterating entity who will come to annihilate his people. This inaugural in a historical trilogy opens with Calling Crow living in his village and wondering what the esoteric cloud ships he sees far out on the ocean may mean. The Spanish who travel in the conveyances have only rascality on their minds. Calling Crow learns the full intent of the voyagers when he is captured by men from one of the cloud ships.
For four years Calling Crow is held prisoner, sufferers much and at last makes good his escape from their clutches. His return to his home village brings little contentment for him; the woman to whom he was affianced has married another, and as problems swell within the population the villagers begin to view him with broadening misgiving. The skepticism increases as villagers begin to die from a inexplicable affliction. At last Calling Crow is pursued out to sea where he sets his course once again for the land where he had been held captive.
Excellent well written account of the earliest citizens along our eastern coastline. Calling Crow is the first in a historical trilogy; it is set in the year 1555 along the South Carolina coast. Writer Clayton has constructed a penetrating adventure thriller sure to dominate the attention of all who are interested in descriptive historical novels.
I am a long time student of history and am pleased to find writer Clayton's research into the era to be evident in his narrative Calling Crow. Clayton's his writing skills are superb as he winds a fascinating tale peopled with characters who are very real and very believable. Combining the wealth of research found in Eric Balkan's City of Tears with the intriguing thrill set down in Gold in The Shadow by Michael Marcotte, Calling Crow is a gripping `can't put it down until the end' read.
The publication is accessible for download, and is on paper.
Reviewed by: Molly Martin
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