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Can Evangelicals Learn from World Religions?: Jesus, Revelation & Religious Traditions Paperback – August 15, 2000


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Editorial Reviews

Review

"This book makes a solid contribution to the evangelical theology of religions. Leaving aside the issue of the fate of the unevangelized, it leads us to expect to learn from people of other faiths and not suppose that they have nothing to teach us. What a gracious and open spirit this message frees us to have." -- Clark H. Pinnock, professor of theology, McMaster Divinity College --This text refers to the MP3 CD edition.

About the Author

Gerald R. McDermott (Ph.D., University of Iowa) is professor of religion and philosophy at Roanoke College in Salem, Virginia. He is also a Teaching Pastor at St. John Lutheran Church. His other books include Living with Cancer, Dear God, It’s Cancer, Cancer, One Holy and Happy Society, Jonathan Edwards Confronts the Gods, Seeing God, Claiming Christ, Understanding Jonathan Edwards, Baker Pocket Guide to World Religions and Oxford Handbook of Evangelical Theology.
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 233 pages
  • Publisher: IVP Academic (August 15, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0830822747
  • ISBN-13: 978-0830822744
  • Product Dimensions: 8.2 x 5.5 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #633,090 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Eric Nelson on June 8, 2002
Format: Paperback
McDermott writes a much-needed book that helps those in the evangelical Christian tradition find a way to truly respect other religious traditions without selling out the store. Citing examples of such biblical figures as Melchizedek, Balaam, and others who speak the word of the one true God but are not members of the Children of God, McDermott shows that there is biblical evidence for Christians to rediscover truths that are deeply imbedded in the Bible from those who do not confess Christ.
The author is very diligent and often reminds his readers that the Christian claim of the uniqueness of Christ is one that needs to be lifted up. Furthermore, what we learn from those outside our faith is not new knowledge per se but may be a different but helpful approach to biblical principles.
The unfortunate title regrettably misleads readers who will probably be surprised to find a careful study on the nature of revelation and a theological overview of Christianity's major theologians. The concluding chapters offer a great inroad to some Eastern and Near Eastern faiths. Explicitly stating that the acknowledgment of Christ as Lord is the only saving confession, McDermott continues to show how God has continued the biblical tradition of revealing himself to those outside the Christian faith.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
this very well done book takes a look at christian theology/beliefs/spirituality in relation to some of the world religions. this book does not deal with all, or even most religions, but taking a few of the worlds religions such as daoism or buddhism for example, it explores some of the issues of biblical thought in relation to these religions and the issues of truth and praxis. it does not give final answers, and it does not aim to, but it is a good work aiming in the right direction to show that rather than being automatically shut down to other religions, christian thought/belief can be open to learning from some other religions, as there can indeed be found some biblically compatible truth in other religions. this should be a no brainer, but unfortunately, sometimes biblical christian thought/teaching does not foster a very well rounded way for christians to understand how biblical belief can in healthy ways, see other religions for whatever truth they do contain. McDermott does a service to christendom by showing mature, intelligent, fair and biblical directions for thinking about christian belief and other religions. this work should be required reading for christians of all sorts.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Rodney Wilson on September 10, 2007
Format: Paperback
McDermott's primary thesis is this: Evangelicals can learn from the world's religions. He offers chapters on the historical encounter between evangelicals and the religions of the world; the definition of "revelation"; biblical "suggestions" on the world religions (e.g., God-fearing Gentiles and pagans honored by various prophets and by Jesus); theological considerations (typology, the "scandal of exclusivity," covenants); an account of ancient Christian theologians and their views of the world religions in light of the ascendancy of Christ; and finally the four chapters I found most interesting: one each on Buddhism, Daoism, Confucianism and Islam in which McDermott writes explicitly of what he has learned about his own faith, Christianity, from these religions, and ways in which he has come to understand more fully his understanding of the uniqueness of Christ. These final four chapters were quite insightful as an exercise in "comparative" religion.
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Jean Payens on November 11, 2010
Format: Audible Audio Edition
Definitely worth reading - the book tackles the great point of 1st century inter-faith dialogue which is woefully low within the current "western" intelect. However - McDermott does lean lean towards the verge of pluralism in many of his thoughts/comments. While we should all agree that whether a Taoist says they are following the "Tao" or a native american following the "Great Spirit" or an evangelical following the "Holy Spirit" these are all words and we should not get so caught up on them that we miss the point. *However McDermott goes a little too far saying that many of these are one in the same; he does not have a full grasp of Islamic teachings, and would do good to study Ravi Zacharias/William Lane Craig and various other to better understand this world view. He doesn't seem to have a full grasp of Islamic history on Sharia law, or grasp the significance of the Koran denying the death/resurrection of Christ, (which as Paul states is the entirety of the Gospel message and thus cannot be "blended" into Islamic belief like it can with Taoism, Buddhism, confucism)).
**I honestly think McDermott is on the right path if he gathers a more full grasp of Islamic belief (pros/cons), historicity of Christian persecution (Philip Jenkins' books on this are stellar), and makes his stance between Pluralism/inter-dialouge a littler clearer (not just saying he is not a pluralist but then making pluralistic or relativist statements), I think he could be a top voice in the future of the faith when inter-faith/1st century dialouge will be even more important.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By AussieJ on August 7, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Somewhat interesting but spends a lot of time not saying much. Some interesting and true ideas though.
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