Buy New
$8.50
Qty:1
  • List Price: $8.95
  • Save: $0.45 (5%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 2 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
I Can Read That: A Travel... has been added to your Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

I Can Read That: A Traveler's Introduction to Chinese Characters Paperback – November 1, 1994

ISBN-13: 978-0835125338 ISBN-10: 0835125335

Buy New
Price: $8.50
13 New from $3.31 39 Used from $0.01 3 Collectible from $9.98
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$8.50
$3.31 $0.01
Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


Frequently Bought Together

I Can Read That: A Traveler's Introduction to Chinese Characters + Essential Chinese For Travelers + China Survival Guide: How to Avoid Travel Troubles and Mortifying Mishaps, 3rd Edition
Price for all three: $24.94

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 161 pages
  • Publisher: China Books & Periodicals (November 1994)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0835125335
  • ISBN-13: 978-0835125338
  • Product Dimensions: 4.4 x 7.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (23 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #571,682 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Language Notes

Text: English, Chinese

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
5 star
20
4 star
2
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 23 customer reviews
The book is very enjoyable to read and the characters presented are rather easy to learn.
Laura De Giorgio
Chinese has a strong tendency to use two characters for some unit of meaning, and the book provides many such pairs made from the characters learned.
Jack P. Hailman
At the end of the book the author has also provided a brief section with guidelines for writing Chinese characters.
Laura De Giorgio

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

50 of 52 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 12, 2001
Format: Paperback
For the most part, Chinese is really two languages - a written one and a spoken one. One really cannot "sound out" written Chinese Characters, like they can with English. Most books for travelers to China dwell on the spoken language. This is actually a very good idea, because it helps you communicate and get around. But this book is different and fun, because it concentrates on Chinese characters which are beautiful and interesting.
I lived in the city of Shenyang, China for almost a year and a half. I dealt with a lot of Chinese people and Westerners that had been there for varying lengths of time. The Westerners had varying levels of oral Chinese language skills, but it was very rare for me to find a Westerner who knew how to read Chinese. The Westerners that I knew who could read Chinese were for the most part long time scholors on the topic or they learned it from their Chinese relatives.
I read this book, and learned most of the characters in it. I could not even come close to reading a magazine or newspaper, even those for children. But, I knew more Chinese characters than 95% of the Westerners that I knew in China. Most of these foreigners would be impressed when I could read the little I did. For most of the Chinese people I met, I was the only Westerner that they ever met who could read even a few characters. I'd figure a sign out, and they could not believe it. This skill was a great conversation topic, and I soon learned several other characters in the conversations that I had with the locals.
For the most part, this book is not required reading for someone who travels to China. In places where a lot of Westerners travel, many signs are in English, or pin-yin, or "Chinglish" (poor translations from Chinese to English.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
21 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Jack P. Hailman on October 23, 2001
Format: Paperback
I stumbled across Julie Mazel Sussman's wonderful little book in a local bookstore (sorry, Amazon), and not only read through it several times before going to China in October 2001, but took it with me. She selected for presentation about 70 Chinese characters that are relatively simple but commonly encountered in China. I saw every one of them on my trip and was tickled pink to be able to read them. (In places like Taiwan and Singapore the more complicated traditional characters are used, but Sussman's book provides a comparison on p. 132.) The book identifies a lot of other characters in passing so if you are attentive, you can probably learn 150 or 200 characters from this slim book of just 161 pages. Chinese has a strong tendency to use two characters for some unit of meaning, and the book provides many such pairs made from the characters learned. For example, zuo-you (left-right) means "approximately," which I recognized instantly in a Chinese subtitle in a movie shown on the plane. Being able to read, if just partially, the signs and other things you see in China adds to the enjoyment of your trip. But even if you never go to China, you will enjoy this fun book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
18 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Leo Dirac on February 18, 2000
Format: Paperback
This easy book does exactly what it claims to be able to: teaches you a small vocabulary of chinese characters. You won't be able to read much with it, but you will be able to pick out enough characters to get the jist of what some things are getting at.
Well written. Very accessible. Excellent compliment to chinese language tapes for anybody trying to learn basic language skills before a trip.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
20 of 21 people found the following review helpful By mkt on April 9, 2004
Format: Paperback
This is a remarkably good book for a non-Chinese speaking tourist to have. The reviews which say that this book is not for the student of Chinese are correct. It's not a very "deep" book, and it doesn't teach you very many characters. But that's not who the book is meant for.
I travelled to China last year, not knowing a word of Chinese and certainly not having any ability to make out the characters. Prior to that trip, I might occasionally read an article or website which would show me the characters for, say, "China", but they'd so to speak go in one eyeball and out the other -- I simply couldn't retain or learn or even really *see* the characters.
A travel article recommended _I Can Read That_ so I bought it, and it was a miracle. Literally on the first page, in the first few minutes of reading it, I at last started to realize "oh, there's a system behind all these characters". I could now look at Chinese characters, and though I couldn't truly read them (since I don't even know Chinese), I could start to truly see them, recognize them, and learn them.
After 5 minutes of reading, I'd learned 5 characters. After another 5 minutes, 5 more. After that, well there's a limit to how much information my brain can take in at once, but I kept reading the book and learning characters.
It was as exciting an experience as learning to read must have been (I actually don't remember).
And, to return to the first theme, this could all be done without "studying" per se, or taking a class. It can be done on the run, while travelling in China (or on the plane to China).
So, the book is no substitute for actually taking a Chinese class or learning from an in-depth book.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews