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I Can Read You Like a Book: How to Spot the Messages and Emotions People Are Really Sending With Their Body Language Paperback – March 1, 2007


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I Can Read You Like a Book: How to Spot the Messages and Emotions People Are Really Sending With Their Body Language + How to Spot a Liar, Revised Edition: Why People Don't Tell the Truth...and How You Can Catch Them + The Body Language Handbook: How to Read Everyone's Hidden Thoughts and Intentions
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 287 pages
  • Publisher: Career Pr Inc (March 1, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1564149412
  • ISBN-13: 978-1564149411
  • Product Dimensions: 8.2 x 5.3 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (33 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #709,318 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

This informative tale claims that listeners will easily learn the craft of reading body language upon completing this recorded course. Authors and narrators Hartley and Karinch try to convey the lessons in a straightforward seminar, but they almost seem to be outdoing each other. They take turns speaking, sometimes only one word at a time, while at other times Hartley assumes the role of the main speaker as Karinch spouts off chapter titles and section headlines every so often. She acts more like an all-knowing dictionary and encyclopedia, making this audiobook sound more like a textbook. The lessons may work for many listeners, given Hartley's background in the subject, but he races through them so fast that his point is muddled away. There is no time for the audience to take it all in and practice for themselves. A Career Press paperback. (Feb.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to the Audio CD edition.

From the Back Cover

"The best spies have street smarts and an intuitive understanding of the human psyche. This revealing book shows how anybody can put these skills to use in everyday life."

-Thomas Boghardt, historian, International Spy Museum, Washington, D.C.

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Customer Reviews

This book is a huge disappointment.
Jabberwock
His personality is so abrasive that it makes it difficult to read the book and get any information out of it whatsoever.
JPayne
This book, didn't really grab me, not after reading "The Definitive Book of Body Language" by Pease and Pease.
R. Calhelha

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

126 of 141 people found the following review helpful By Jabberwock on November 9, 2007
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
My first B.A. was in Interpersonal Communication, a large part of which involved nonverbal communication (aka body language). That was decades ago. Now I enjoy reading more recent information to get different opinions and updated theories.

This book is a huge disappointment. If you remove the generalized information such as making sure you understand what is normal for any given person before attempting to read his/her body language, you are unfortunately left with the author's egomaniacal biography. You even get to know how he has his hair cut (military flat top) and what kind of cowboy boots he wears (steel-toed), although neither applies to reading someone like a book. The author just really seems to want to talk about himself.

In one section, the reader is shown a photo of a man, woman, and child. You know, due to the author's own "baseline," that this is a family photo. Instead of simply explaining what the nonverbal communication in the picutre means, the author goes on for several pages describing the lives of each of the people in the photo. There is no reason for this; it has nothing to do with the point theoretically being made. We even get to hear about the "estranged grandfather." After the brief explanation of his posture, we are told that Grandpa "at the age of 35, went ashore on D-Day, with the 29th Infantry Division; to some extent, that earned him the right to look cocky." Huh? Do you want to hear that subjective bit of information, much less need to read it?

I'm sure Gregory Hartley really is a big ol' beer-guzzling macho guy who intimidates the daylights out of those he so proudly interrogates, but I personally find him so annoying I can only give very little credibility to the information in his book.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Greg A. Tirevold VINE VOICE on November 30, 2009
Format: Paperback
The author approaches this subject from a specific vantage point, that of an interrogator. Once I was properly oriented with where he was coming from then many of his anecdotes and bits of advice became more understandable. His advice and methods are geared towards dealing with hostile or suspicious people, with much emphasis on the pitfalls of cultural differences. This is not really a book of social situation analysis where people are typically more amicable.

It contains details about reactions that are near-universal due to biology such as pupil dilation and the changes in a persons mucosa(not something I've seen covered much elsewhere). Much of this is delivered in a matter of fact tone that reminds me of a seminar transcript. This is not a bad thing except that without lots of pictures the text can be a tad confusing in its explanations. One example deals with watching people's eye movements when they recall an event versus constructing an imaginary event. He explains that right handed people's eyes tend to go up and right when constructing a visual image (i.e. making something up) but the text doesn't make it clear if this is "their" right or "your" right when looking at them. Other books I've read on the subject make this much clearer since they contain many more pictures. They show you a person you are looking at and detail the movements as you'd see them, not as you'd do them, hence up and right means up and left when looking at a person.

I understand what some other reviewers say about it being a tad ego centric as it is obvious the author tries to project a personality of authority and toughness. This image likely works better in interrogations, or even in a live seminar on the topic, than it does in a print format that is trying to teach something.
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31 of 40 people found the following review helpful By Ricardo Zelaya on April 5, 2007
Format: Paperback
This book simply fails to deliver on its promise. Except for the obvious, it does not teach anything special to a businessman, salesman, or anyone for that matter. I have no book to recommend, I will go to the public library and check the book before buying another book of this type. This book is all bark and no bite. Save your money. Yes, I read the whole book!!!
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By James Taylor on March 7, 2010
Format: Paperback
Having read a number of books about body language, most of which have lots of pictures and written analysis of 'frozen moments', I was pleasantly surprised when I read this book. Here is a different take on body language, an approach that cites many real-life examples, explaining the body language of various interactions step by step as they evolve, rather than offering the usual explanations of magazine poses.

At the beginning of the book the emphasis is on cultural differences in body expression, then the book moves on to discuss the classification of body language - as in illustrators, adaptors, regulators and barriers, giving great insight into the reasons for, and ways in which each class is used, and then you will find my favourite section, a section where well known public exchanges between various politicians and celebrities are discussed in micro detail. Finally, the author examines ways we might use our new knowledge, offering us the insight of experience rather than the usual speculation.

All the situations are discussed in a way that enables you to feel and identify how and why the body language in question took place, which is, of course, more useful than the usual frozen moment without context. So, if you want a book about body language which REALLY leaves you feeling that you've learned something, this is probably the book for you!
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