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We Cannot Remain Silent: Opposition to the Brazilian Military Dictatorship in the United States (Radical Perspectives) Hardcover – July 2, 2010


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Editorial Reviews

Review

“For American audiences who ask why Brazil matters, Brown University history professor James N. Green answers with an extensive study of a country ruled by law absent of habeas corpus and filled with unspeakable torture. Green highlights both the U.S. government’s complicity in the 1964 coup that overthrew a reform-minded president and the decades long efforts of American activists and Brazilian exiles to unmask the horror.” - John Pantalone, Providence Journal


We Cannot Remain Silent is an important contribution to Brazilian scholarship. . . . Yet its value goes well beyond the field of Brazilian history. Green’s study reminds Latin Americanists of the importance of looking beyond the geographical boundaries of authoritarian nation-states when analyzing opposition movements. For U.S. scholars, his work provides insight into an oft-overlooked aspect of American responses to military regimes in Latin America. . . . Green’s balanced integration of scholarship and resources from both Brazil and the United States provides a useful model for transnational history. . . . [V]arious contributions make Green’s work an important and enjoyable study for scholars throughout the Americas.” - Colin Michael Snider, H-LatAm, H-Net Reviews


We Cannot Remain Silent makes a substantial contribution, both methodologically and theoretically, to understanding the role of aesthetics and emotions in framing and resource mobilization processes. It is also an important example of the use of oral histories in studying the construction of activist identities. In addition, the book provides methodological elements in the analysis of affinity networks and frame convergence that can be used in other social movement case studies.” - Ana Margarida Esteves, Mobilization


“James N. Green provides a volume that in itself is an exemplar of
historical presentation in that he provides multiple perspectives. He also
created innovative narrative strategies that carry the reader along with
pleasure through a long and richly detailed history.” - Edward L. Cleary, A Contracorriente


We Cannot Remain Silent is an important book that deserves to be read by a wide audience. Human rights activists, Latin American specialists, and students of U.S. foreign relations can learn much from Green’s analysis of the campaign to end human rights abuses in Brazil. This book makes a strong case that global social activism can make a difference in ways that are sometimes unpredictable and hard to fathom except in retrospect.”
- Stephen M. Streeter, Journal of American History


We Cannot Remain Silent is an exemplary piece of historical research that simultaneously performs an act of recuperation and interpretation. James N. Green’s gripping study not only discloses an aspect of (U.S.-based) opposition to the Brazilian military regime that had previously gone largely unacknowledged, but also demonstrates how a transnational approach to this history can reveal and reconstitute a series of narratives that are crucial for understanding the politics of this era.”—Barbara Weinstein, author of For Social Peace in Brazil: Industrialists and the Remaking of the Working Class in São Paulo, 1920–1964


We Cannot Remain Silent is the most complete and comprehensive analysis ever made of the multiple paths and confluences among the political and cultural resistance in Brazil and the United States after the military coup d’état in Brazil in 1964. Based on new sources and a broad range of interviews, James N. Green reveals unexpected coalitions, introduces new actors, and tells fascinating human stories. His book is obligatory reading and a tool for reaching the truth about the background of torture and political killings carried out during twenty-one years of military dictatorship. It is essential for understanding the struggle for human rights in Brazil then and now.”—Paulo Sérgio Pinheiro, Commissioner, Inter-American Commission on Human Rights, Organization of American States


We Cannot Remain Silent provides a new understanding of the development of human rights discourses in Brazil and the Americas. Working with a range of sources, both oral and written, James N. Green shows how a small group of activists in the educational and religious spheres successfully created a transnational space for changing U.S. policy toward Brazil’s military dictatorship and, with it, the systematic torture of political activists. This book challenges the traditional understanding of political opposition in Latin America during the sixties and seventies. In doing so, We Cannot Remain Silent opens up new methodological vistas toward all post–World War II dictatorships.”—Jeffrey Lesser, author of A Discontented Diaspora: Japanese Brazilians and the Meanings of Ethnic Militancy, 1960–1980


We Cannot Remain Silent makes a substantial contribution, both methodologically and theoretically, to understanding the role of aesthetics and emotions in framing and resource mobilization processes. It is also an important example of the use of oral histories in studying the construction of activist identities. In addition, the book provides methodological elements in the analysis of affinity networks and frame convergence that can be used in other social movement case studies.”
(Ana Margarida Esteves, Mobilization)

We Cannot Remain Silent is an important book that deserves to be read by a wide audience. Human rights activists, Latin American specialists, and students of U.S. foreign relations can learn much from Green’s analysis of the campaign to end human rights abuses in Brazil. This book makes a strong case that global social activism can make a difference in ways that are sometimes unpredictable and hard to fathom except in retrospect.”
(Stephen M. Streeter, Journal of American History)

We Cannot Remain Silent is an important contribution to Brazilian scholarship. . . . Yet its value goes well beyond the field of Brazilian history. Green’s study reminds Latin Americanists of the importance of looking beyond the geographical boundaries of authoritarian nation-states when analyzing opposition movements. For U.S. scholars, his work provides insight into an oft-overlooked aspect of American responses to military regimes in Latin America. . . . Green’s balanced integration of scholarship and resources from both Brazil and the United States provides a useful model for transnational history. . . . [V]arious contributions make Green’s work an important and enjoyable study for scholars throughout the Americas.”
(Colin Michael Snider, H-LatAm, H-Net Reviews)

“For American audiences who ask why Brazil matters, Brown University history professor James N. Green answers with an extensive study of a country ruled by law absent of habeas corpus and filled with unspeakable torture. Green highlights both the U.S. government’s complicity in the 1964 coup that overthrew a reform-minded president and the decades long efforts of American activists and Brazilian exiles to unmask the horror.”
(John Pantalone, Providence Journal)

“James N. Green provides a volume that in itself is an exemplar of
historical presentation in that he provides multiple perspectives. He also
created innovative narrative strategies that carry the reader along with
pleasure through a long and richly detailed history.”
(Edward L. Cleary, A Contracorriente)

About the Author

James N. Green is Professor of Brazilian History and Culture at Brown University and past president of the Brazilian Studies Association. He is the editor of Lina Penna Sattamini’s A Mother’s Cry: A Memoir of Politics, Prison, and Torture under the Brazilian Military Dictatorship, also published by Duke University Press, and the author of Beyond Carnival: Male Homosexuality in Twentieth-Century Brazil.

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Product Details

  • Series: Radical Perspectives
  • Hardcover: 472 pages
  • Publisher: Duke University Press Books (July 2, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0822347172
  • ISBN-13: 978-0822347170
  • Product Dimensions: 6.4 x 1.3 x 9.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #5,980,622 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Pitney on August 16, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The book deals with so many facts about the Brazilian overthrow of democracy by the military in 1964, the merciless crackdown in 1968-9, and support by the US, that were unknown while it was going on. This book tracks the lies and inhumane actions of the military regime to tighten control over the Brazilian people to prevent any critics from being heard or becoming leaders, using murder and torture to terrorize the populace. It is an excellent book and extremely well written. A must read for those interested in Latin American history and the relationship between the US Government and dictatorships.
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