Industrial-Sized Deals Shop all Back to School Shop Women's Handbags Learn more nav_sap_plcc_6M_fly_beacon $5 Albums $5 Off Fire TV Stick Off to College Essentials Shop Popular Services pivdl pivdl pivdl  Amazon Echo Starting at $99 Kindle Voyage Nintendo Digital Games Shop Back to School with Amazon Back to School with Amazon Outdoor Recreation STEM Toys & Games
Questions & Answers
Please make sure that your post is a question about the product. Edit your question or post anyway.
Sort: Most Helpful first | Newest first
Showing 1-10 of 99 questions
2
votes
I used it to take pictures at my fiance's son's wedding and they came out fantastic. Some of the longer shots were blurry but I think it was more a matter of my getting to know the camera (which I had bought only a month previous). It was an outdoor wedding and I was in the second row and got amazing shots of the bride and groom during the ceremony with no tripod and by simply stabilizing the lens with my left hand.
Sep 21, 2006 by DG
1
vote
The extra 100mm is quite a bit, in fact it makes a big difference if you are into shooting animals/birds/sports from a distance. Of course, you can buy a 1.4 extender for the 70-200 (they do have a X2 converter, but with the f4 lens you loose auto-focus and hence it isn't a great combo) which almost gives you as much reach as the 70-300 and the same f as you lose a stop with the extender - but you will not have the IS. I had both the 70-200 f4 and the 70-300 IS for almost two weeks and they are both extremely good lenses. I know there have been some comments in the forums about a portrait problem with some 70-300 IS units being a little blurry but from what I can gather it was much more likely to happen with the earlier batches and Canon seems to have quietly fixed it. Certainly check as it will be immediately obvious apparently, but either way you should be fine buying one now and mine certainly is extremely sharp portrait wise. I ended up getting the 70-300 IS which has been very useful, but the 70-200 f4 is a great lens also it really depends on what you will find more useful. Some people don't like the off-white colour of the 70-200 as they feel it makes you stand out more yet others like it because it is obvioulsy an L zoom with the off-white colour, I think I fall with the majority of not caring either way. If you want to see a review of each and what the 100mm may get you, there may be a website of some use to you at http://www.photozone.de/8Reviews/index.html. Now that I am making some money from images, I think I will sell my 70-300 IS for the 70-200 f2.8 only because I need the extra speed to shoot inside churches from a distance and neither the 70-200 f4 nor the 70-300 IS has a large enough apurature for this, but if you are primarily shooting outside then both are great lenses. If you are able to, go down to a local camera shop and try both, most camera stores are more than happy to let you do this and if they aren't I'd find another camera shop. One last comment, in case you are looking for 2nd hand lenses, do not get the old 75-300 IS as it is much worse (I had it for a time) than either. It has the old IS which doesn't help as much, doesn't have UD glass which seems to make a big differnece and normally found only on L lenses, basically it isn't worth saving a small amount of money on. In addition, although I've never tried it, if I was buying one of these two lenses again I may give the Sigma 80-400 OS (which is their version of Image Stabilization) a try to compare it as you get even more reach with that lens and Sigma sometimes makes great lenses but they are not as consistant as Canon so you have to make sure you get a good sample.
Apr 9, 2006 by Mark C. Dickson
1
vote
FYI: I've never bought a lens that didn't come with a front & rear lens cap, and I believe every lens made ships with both. Oddly enough, some Canon lenses do not come with hoods, though this one does.
Jan 31, 2009 by John B. Kalla
1
vote
Yes. Canon EF lenses will fit on all Canon bodies. Canon's EF-S lenses are designed for, and fit, only the crop-sensor bodies, which at this moment are ALL DSLR bodies except for the 1D and 5D models. So, with your crop-body, ALL Canon EF lenses will work just fine.
Sep 8, 2012 by James M. Hare
1
vote
I use this lens with or without a tripod. It's a great lens--a little heavy, but not too heavy to hand hold.
Nov 29, 2013 by Carol Von Canon
1
vote
Yeah buying a zoom lens for indoor low light shooting is where photography starts to become expensive. Canon's 70-200 f2.8L is over a thousand dollars, so depending on how far away from the subject you are, I'd suggest a prime lens at any one of several focal lengths offered at apertures of f1.4, f1.8, or f2.8. I've personally had great success using the 50mm f1.8, but since you're asking about telephoto zoom lenses, it seems you might need a little more reach. The Canon 200mm f2.8L lists for $750, and the 100mm f2 is about $400, and that's about the same price as the 85mm f1.8. So it depends on your needs pretty much.
Jul 9, 2009 by P. Ryan
1
vote
If you're shooting sports indoors you're probably gonna want to go with a lens that's a little bit faster (smaller f-number) in order to obtain an adequate shutter speed of greater than 1/250-1/500 seconds. The f/2.8 version of this lens would work better. Cannon also makes several lens which are fairly fast. You have to also take into account how far away from the action you'll have to be and how close to the action you want to get.
Dec 23, 2008 by A. Brewer
1
vote
With limited light as often occurs indoors, the IS (image-stabilized) version would likely provide sharper images (of still subjects) when hand-holding the camera. If using a tripod, the IS version will not provide an advantage; perhaps it helps to think of IS like a "hand-held tripod". It is important to keep in mind that IS, while providing a 3-4 "f-stop advantage" in terms of image sharpness, does not actually increase the aperture of your camera. Therefore, IS does not help when trying to freeze the motion of your subjects, e.g., children running around inside the house. For capturing moving subjects indoors, you would probably want a lens with a larger aperture (lower f-stop) such as f1.8 or at the very least f2.8. A larger aperture gathers more light and allows for a faster shutter speed under given lighting conditions, and the faster shutter speed is what freezes a moving subject. I use the 70-200 f/4L (non-IS version) to capture shots of my kids running around and playing outside (generally plenty of light), and it works very well for this. Considering your lighting, subjects, and whether or not you will use a tripod will help with your decision. Personally, for indoor candid shots I use a f/1.8 lens -- I find that Canon's 28 mm f/1.8 (on a crop body such as T3i) is a very good lens for these indoor shots.
Mar 13, 2015 by E&R
‹ Previous   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   Next ›
 
Unanswered questions
Search Questions and Answers