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7
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Please ignore most of the nonsense that you'll read in other responses. A full frame sensor is about 1.6 times larger than an APS-C sensor. When you shoot with the smaller APS-C sensor found on consumer grade cameras (Rebel, etc) and older pro grade cameras, a large portion of the image at the edges of the field of view is not captured. That and that alone is the only consistent difference between the two sensor sizes. The amount of the scene coming through the lens that is captured, period. The angle of view of a given lens (e.g., 50mm, 80mm, 135mm, 70-200mm zoom, etc) is based on recording to 35mm film which of course was the standard for SLR cameras for decades before digital came along. Most lenses are still designed to record images to 35mm, though you can buy lenses made specifically for APS-C sensor cameras. "Full frame" sensors are the same size as a frame of 35mm film, hence the name, "full frame". It records a full frame (35mm) image. On an APS-C camera for example, a 50mm lens will record the equivalent image of an 80mm lens on a full frame (35mm) camera. In order to capture the same scene size with a 50mm lens on a APS-C camera as that 50mm lens on a full frame sensor, you have to stand way back of the scene to get more in the frame. BECAUSE OF THIS ONLY, you have wider depth of field, because you are further away from the scene. Please do not believe the nonsense posted below that indicates that a full frame sensor automatically gives shallower depth of field. It does not. It has nothing to do with the sensor. It has to do only with the aperture size and the distance of the lens element from the sensor. Also has nothing to do with image quality- image quality is determined by the QUALITY of the sensor (not it's size), the quality of the lens and the quality of the image processor in the camera (if you are shooting in JPEG). I have a 10 year old EOS 10D with an APS-C 5 megapixel sensor that shoots incredible images, when shot in raw, with a good lens and "developed" on the computer. Not as good as the 6D though, it has a much newer, higher quality sensor. Coincidental to all of this is that the 6D has fantastic low light focusing and sensitivity and very low noise at high ISO. Again though, this has nothing to do with the fact that it is full frame, only that it is a very very high quality camera and sensor.
Dec 13, 2013 by John Anderson
3
votes
2
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You have to research each individual lens for specifications. I use BH Photo Video website for this purpose. There you find whether they will work. Some lenses are specifically for cropped sensors. Out of 9 lenses that I own only one, a Tamron 17-50mm, did not work for my Canon 6D.
Feb 14, 2013 by Tony A.
2
votes
No, Due to sensor size you do not want to use an EF-S size lens. There would be a vignette about half of the sensor size even if there was an adapter to use. There would be a big black circle around your whole image.
Jan 11, 2014 by Michigan
2
votes
Camera software, USB cable, Canon 6d strap, video component Cable, battery with cover, Canon 6d sensor cover, and warranty forms
Apr 30, 2014 by j
1
vote
Hero 3 Jul 8, 2013
What is the question?
Jul 9, 2013 by Dennis
1
vote
I have a 5DmkIII and having seen a few a folks using the 6D, I rented a 6D and spent a long weekend filling up SD cards. My conclusion is that 6D is a terrific value. My 5DmkIII is for sale. I suppose if you make a living doing some kind of journalism you might say that the more over engineered 5DmkIII is better suited to redundancy and unique shooting situations but the 6D is by no means "slow", less easy to use nor adjust. Frankly MOST of the actual things that I set for routine use like taking pictures of my family indoors vs out and such are so easy to set on the 6D that I half suspect more future Canon DSLRs will adopt its control layout... When it comes to auto-focus points I will admit that a few times with my 5DmkIII I selected a mode that did not really match the contrast of the subject -- classic example is ducks floating on lake -- I selected the wave crests in the foreground instead of the bird. Lesson: use central point and recompose. I have talked informally to other folks with similar experience. Until some break through in mind reading focus selection occurs more points is not really better... Durability of glass display stands to reason to be better than plastic. I will probably investigate some kind of protective shield like ghost armor. The top of the 6D is made of material that allows WiFi and GPS signals to travel through it unlike the "full metal jacket" of the 5DmkIII but there is really no way that top of camera is going to get any significant wear ... Learning curve? 5DmkIII has probably 5x more things that you could customize -- some is suited to that sort of "journalist redundancy" like the various options for the operation of the dual card slots and multiple custom memory controls so I would not say that it has particularly steep a learning curve for "normal" use but since those options do not exist in 6D it has "smaller areas under the curve" not to mention the impossibility to do something "wrong". Neither camera has a bunch of gimmicky things that make no sense... It is useful to have WiFi & GPS available to have functionality with connected laptop or iPad, things that cost extra with the more costly 5DmkIII... I never made a dime with my camera. I got the 5DmkIII originally because I was frustrated with the poor low light performance of my previous digital cameras and was very impressed with the extreme sensitivity the 5DmkIII and absence of undesirable noise. The 6D has the same performance! I also liked the idea of video but honestly have not found more than few minutes of video to be particularly enjoyable to review. I have shot youth sports and auto racing and find the 6D 4.5fps adequate for such use and the differenc of the 5DmkIII 6 fps hard to detect in such use... I suspect that whatever the future holds for full frame Canon cameras and lenses the 6D will remain very desirable camera. Because it is more widely affordable than the 5DmkIII it likely be snatched up quickly, sort of like how it is easier to sell a Camaro Z-28 with the same motor as Corvette...
Jan 13, 2014 by WAKE_UP
1
vote
It totally depends on the most used features of the 5D Mark III that you used. The AF is much more basic on the 6D. The build isn't as solid feeling, the sensor is a hairs smaller, and the buffer is smaller. Other than that, the sensitivity of the sensor and the processor speed great. Are you doing a lot of HDR raw? 6D doesn't do HDR Raw. Are you monitoring any filming of your kid wi headphones? The 6D doesn't have an additional monitoring jack. I got a 6D and haven't looked back and would have not qualms about shooing a client with it. I hope this helps. If needed, go to a local camera store and get your hands on one for the feel. Good Luck.
Apr 2, 2014 by Kevin Danjou
0
votes
I own (and love) both of these cameras, but the 6D is my new favorite for the grandchildren. It is quieter and you will never need a flash. The high ISO means you can use a faster shutter indoors -- fewer blurry kids.
Dec 21, 2012 by SEN
0
votes
I believe it is 12800 or 25600 by default. I set mine to 12800 as max due to noise. But you can change the auto ISO range. Yes you can set the shutter speed to any setting and the auto ISO will compensate for the shutter speed. My only warning is at high shutter speeds except in good light, the ISO may get pushed to a point a lot of noise is introduced.
Oct 4, 2013 by David Burnette
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