Canon EOS 60D 18 MP CMOS Digital SLR Camera with 3.0-Inch LCD (Body Only) forum
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They're very close - but there are some differences. The 60D shoots at 5.3 frames per second (in continuous burst mode) vs. the T3i's 3.7 frames per sec. The 60D body has it's buttons laid out a bit more like a pro body with a large LCD on the top-right side of the camera vs. the T3i being laid out a bit more like a Rebel body (it is a Rebel body). The 60D body has some moderate weather sealing (gaskets, etc. around all the openings) so a light spray of water wouldn't bother it. Canon doesn't advertise the weather seals, but a tear-down of the body reveals they are there. The T3i body does not have weather seals. Both cameras have polycarbonate (durable plastic) bodies. To get into a magnesium alloy (metal) body you would have to upgrade to at least a Canon 7D or higher model. Some photographers claim that it's easier for them to "steady" a heavier camera than a lighter camera -- but there is no rule here... it's going to be a matter of personal preference. The lenses you select will make a bigger difference with respect to the image quality than the camera body. How much you should invest in a serious lens would depend entirely on what you plan to do with the pictures. If you're shooting pictures which you'll be sharing with friends & family via social websites then it won't matter... there isn't enough detail in a web-sized picture to be able to see weaknesses in the image quality. If you're planning to print 16x20s and have them framed and mounted on your walls (or sell them in a gallery) then the image quality will matter a LOT -- it's easy to see flaws in the image quality when the pictures is extremely large. Probably the biggest and most significant difference between the two is the focusing system. The T3i uses the same focusing system as the other Rebels -- a system designed for the old 30D. It's a 9 point focus system. A DSLR focuses by using something known as a "phase detect" focus sensor. If you've ever used an old 35mm film camera with the "split prism" focuser, you'd be familiar with how the image is split into two half-moons. The image in these half-moons slide horizontally. When the image in the top and bottom halves of of the prism align, then the camera is focused correctly for that subject. E.g. if you were to look at a flag-pole, you'd notice the pole doesn't actually line up until it's in focus. The "phase detect" auto-focus system is an electronic implementation of the same concept. The problem with phase-detect AF sensors is that it is possible to make life hard for them. They don't like to work in low light. They also can be fooled based on a pattern in the subject (if the subject has stripes and those stripes run in the same direction as the sensor then the sensor would have a hard time determine if the subject is "in phase".) There's an improved (and more expensive) version of the sensor called the "cross type" sensor. It has higher precision, is faster, and detects phase in two directions at the same time (both horizontally and vertically). Hence the name "cross type". On a T3i only the center point is a cross-type sensor. All other AF points are either horizontal or vertical. On a 60D, ALL auto-focus points are cross-type. The 60D has a much better focusing system. It's faster, more accurate, and more predictive (the computer can actually track subjects moving toward or away from you and predict where the correct focus point will be at the moment when the shutter opens.) Both the 60D and the T3i have the flip-out LCD on the back. People who want to use the camera to shoot video love this. People who want a camera for stills... not so much. When shooting stills, you always put your eye to the viewfinder. On any Canon DSLR currently sold today APART FROM the 60D and T3i, the camera body has a proximity sensor that turns off the LCD when you put the camera up to your eye. The 60D and T3i lack that sensor... so the display stays on. If you don't think you would use the camera to shoot video... you may actually prefer the T2i to the T3i. A T2i and T3i are otherwise identical except for the flip-out LCD panel. That and the T3i has an internal IR emitter that allows it to remotely fire an external Canon Speedlite flash such as a Canon Speedlite 430EX II. The T2i would require a flash that can operate in "master" mode or Canon makes a dedicated remote Speedlite flash controller that mounts onto any Canon DSLR that isn't equipped with an IR emitter built into the body.
Sep 5, 2011 by T. Campbell
2
votes
A good lens is always a good or better investment. Lenses will last you across several bodies. Micro adjustment is a feature few people use or need. Yes, it's a "nice to have" but by no means necessary, few lenses require micro adjustment and the process to determine whether a lens needs it or not is fairly involved. Having said that, whining about things like this is red-meat for the Bulletin Board crowd who need things to complain about to make themselves appear knowledgeable. The same with the "Plastic Body." Have you ever seen a cracked camera body? Cameras with plastic bodies have been dropped from airplanes, picked-up, dusted off, and work perfectly. These Carbon Resin (not plastic) bodies are very tough and can take a lot of abuse. Don't get hung up on these little nits, buy a camera that has the features you really want or need and stick within your budget. Even the entry level cameras of today are fantastic image making machines. It's the person behind the camera that usually needs the upgrading.
Mar 25, 2012 by Robert L. Taylor
1
vote
Canon 60d or 7d? Jan 4, 2011
Is money a problem? If you are looking to get max for $$$ the 60D is very much worth looking at. High ISO? check. 5+ fps? check. Articulating screen? Check. If money isn't an issue and you shoot sports or other fast moving scenes then it is hard to beat the 7D. 8fps brings several advantages in that realm. Heavy duty body is good if you are hard on equipment. I have the 60D after lusting for the 7D. I simply could not justify the $500 difference. I would rather invest in better glass (f2.8 to shoot indoor sports) than pay for a HD body I don't need. Both shoot video with the advantage going to the 60D for the articulating screen. There may - MAY - be a slight noise benefit to the 7D due to the dual Digic 4 processors, but I doubt you will notice for anything that is printed at common size. That's my 2 cents, I hope it helps.
Jan 4, 2011 by Drive On
1
vote
Since this is your first DSLR I will recomend the Canon 18-135 as a good all around lens. Overtime you may find the need or desire for other lenses like primes and L but to get you started the 18-135 will do a good job.
Jan 13, 2013 by JM Mora
1
vote
I use two lenses for most of my work although I do have a number of other lenses for special tasks such as macro. for most of my landscapes I use a Sigma 18-250 macro lens. It's very versatile and give me photos with little chromatic aberrations. It's fairly fast at F3.5 and the nice thing is I can keep it on the camera 75% of the time. The other lens I use a lot it the Sigma 150-500 Auto focus. It's great for shooting wild life shot such as song birds near a bird feeder or a bear you don't want to get too close to. I have other lenses I use also but nearly as often as I use these two. Don
Aug 20, 2013 by Don Schultz
1
vote
It depends on your preferences: if you are serious about photography then you'd want 60D. If you just want to take nice family photos then Rebel will be more then enough.
Jul 9, 2013 by Janusz Raszewski
0
votes
this would be a great camrea just for that. it will take great shoots, but team that up with a good speed flash and you got a killer camera.
Feb 15, 2013 by Amazon Customer
0
votes
I would say get the 18-55 and use the $150 difference toward a 55-250 while you are starting out. You will probably want something longer than 135mm regardless, and depending on how far you go with your photography, there may come a point where none of the three lenses mentioned in this post is "good enough" anymore. ;)
Mar 12, 2011 by L Willis
0
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Where is in made in? Jul 28, 2012
If your referring to the camera body it's Made in Japan.
Sep 4, 2012 by Keith K.
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