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1,761 of 1,786 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars PERFECT!
Whether you're new to the world of DSLRs, or are a seasoned photographer who wants to try your luck at video, the Canon Rebel T2i is perfect. I've had nothing but great experiences with it so far, and highly recommend to everyone.

Other than the T2i, I own (and primarily shoot with) the Rebel XS (1000D), and also have extensive experience with the Canon 50D...
Published on March 11, 2010 by Cinnamon

versus
406 of 501 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars No substitute for an easy to use camcorder.
I had always wanted to get rid of my mini DV tape camcorder, a very nice Panasonic 3 CCD unit, go with solid memory, and combine it with a nice DSLR just to save room in the old camera bag. Not a bad idea until you actually try it. I happened to be in California on a visit and went into a Fry's store, lo and behold they had a Canon T2i kit "In Stock".....I just had to...
Published on May 14, 2010 by OkieBart


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1,761 of 1,786 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars PERFECT!, March 11, 2010
This review is from: Canon EOS Rebel T2i DSLR Camera with EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS Lens (OLD MODEL) (Camera)
Whether you're new to the world of DSLRs, or are a seasoned photographer who wants to try your luck at video, the Canon Rebel T2i is perfect. I've had nothing but great experiences with it so far, and highly recommend to everyone.

Other than the T2i, I own (and primarily shoot with) the Rebel XS (1000D), and also have extensive experience with the Canon 50D. While my XS still serves me very well, I wanted to get an SLR with video capabilities since the release of the T1i. After finally saving up enough for the T1i, I really lucked out that Canon announced the T2i, which has even better features! I am lucky enough to finally have it, and want to share my experiences, and how they compare to my expectations
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OVERALL IMPRESSIONS
The camera is very small and light. It is not weather-sealed or as durable as some of the more expensive SLRs, but it doesn't "feel cheap" in my opinion. It features a 3-inch LCD (compared to the Rebel XS's 2.5 inch screen), which also has a very high resolution. It looks lovely! Auto-focus is fast, and I've been very pleased with the quality of the pictures and videos I've taken so far.
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PROS
IMAGE QUALITY: I feared that cramming so many megapixels onto this sensor, there would be a lot of image 'noise' (the megapixel myth). This thankfully hasn't been an issue, and I've been very pleased with the pictures taken with this camera! Aside from White Balance issues (see below, Cons), image quality is pretty good!

VIDEO: Some people have disparagingly said that Video on DSLRs is just a gimmick. I disagree. Based on sample clips I'd seen on YouTube, I was excited about getting an HDSLR, and while videos are sometimes shaky if you don't have very steady hands, a tripod eliminates those concerns. Audio quality on the T1i was criticized by many, but the T2i has a microphone input jack, which allows you to connect a mic. I don't yet own one so can't comment on that feature, but will update this review if and when I save enough to try this feature out. Additionally, this offers improved recording options, including higher fps (frames per second) than the T1i, which technically offered "true HD" recording of 1080, but only at a choppy 20 fps.

LOW-LIGHT PERFORMANCE: I am much more impressed than I expected. My Rebel XS could go up to ISO 1600, but would perform pretty poorly there. This not only can go up to a significantly higher ISO level, but performs much better. Less image noise means you have to waste less time editing your pics, and many more keepers!

SDXC SUPPORT: Only own SDHC cards up until now, but it's great to know that this supports the next generation of flash storage, which means you'll in the future be able to hold many more pictures than currently available.

CONS
NOT A FULL-FRAME SLR: This is not a full-frame SLR like the Canon 5D Mark II, and the APS-C sized sensor results in a crop factor (1.6x), and doesn't necessarily provide the same image quality as the larger, full-frame sensor does. Still, at less than half the cost of the Mark II, I think this is a trade-off that's well worth it for most users.

Crop factor means that this camera, like other Canon DSLRs that have the APS-C size image sensor, will not be true to the lens's designation. A 50mm lens will produce an image more in line with 50mm x 1.6, or 80mm on a full-frame. This not only makes a difference for those who want to do landscape photography (which usually benefits from wide-angle views), but for those with unsteady hands. The general logic is that to ensure a steady shot, you need to shoot at the reciprocal of your focal length. So for a 50mm focal length, you should be shooting at a speed faster than 1/50 second for a steady shot. Keeping the crop factor in mind, you really should be shooting at a speed faster than 1/80 a second.

Crop factors are common for most digital SLRs, as full-frame sensors jack up the cost of production, which are then passed on to the consumer in the form of very expensive cameras. So it's not so much a shortcoming of the Rebel T2i, but just a note to keep in the back of your mind.

DIFFERENT BATTERY: This is more of a hassle for those who owned spare batteries than for those whose first SLR would be the T2i, but Canon changed the battery. Again, not such a big deal, but might be a hassle for some who find out that their old batteries can't be used on this model.

WHITE BALANCE: I found that the 'Auto' White-Balance setting was wildly inaccurate on my Rebel XS (often giving indoor shots a yellow tint unless I changed the WB to the 'Incandescent Light' mode), and I feel that the WB settings on this model still aren't as accurate as they should be. If you want truly accurate WB, you can use a gray card, or an alternative would be to simply try digitally editing the photos on your computer after shooting.

NO ARTICULATING SCREEN: No articulating screen, but this is a rare feature in DSLR's in general, so it's not a shortcoming of the T2i. Since most of your shots will probably be composed using the viewfinder, not a big deal, although it would have been convenient! If you absolutely must have an articulating screen on an HDSLR, look into the Nikon D5000.

===================
A NOTE ABOUT THE KIT LENS
The lens that comes with this is the standard 18-55 f/3.5-5.6 that comes with the other Rebels. It's a very good all-around lens, but you more likely than not will want to at some point upgrade your lens for either (a) better image quality, or (b) better performance in low-light conditions.

This lens is very good, but for pros or those who pay incredibly close attention to detail, the optical quality of Canon's higher-end lenses is superior than to the kit lens. For most users, I don't think image quality will be a huge issue.

More likely, the aperture size will be the reason people want to upgrade their lens over time. A lens with a wider aperture allows more light to reach the sensor in less time than a lens with a narrower aperture. That means you can employ a faster shutter speed, which allows you to snap the shot faster, reducing the likelihood of a blurry picture. Outdoors on a sunny day, this aperture range of this lens won't be a limiting factor; inside a poorly-lit gym, however, you'll notice some blurry shots (see below for a recommended alternative for low-light shooting).

Still, this is a pretty good all-around lens that can result in some great shots!
===================
RECOMMENDED ACCESSORIES

1. An external flash: This will come in very handy. With the built-in flash, your photos often come out harshly lit. Bouncing an external flash off the wall makes a huge difference in image quality. I personally use the Speedlite 580EX II, but there are cheaper alternatives that are very good. Some higher-end cameras (i.e. Canon 5D Mark II) don't even have a built-in flash, which goes to show something about how high-level photographers view the lighting provided by internal flashes.

2. 50mm f/1.8 II lens - At around one hundred dollars, this lens is relatively cheap when compared to others on the market. Despite its low price, it offers great image quality. While it lacks IS (image stabilization) like some other Canon lenses (including the kit lens), with a wide aperture of f/1.8, enough light usually comes in to ensure a fast shutter speed, which in turn minimizes camera shake. Keep in mind that as a 'prime' lens, your feet will have to do the zooming in and out. This is not as convenient as an everyday walk-around lens like the 18-55 kit lens which gives a good zoom range, but is a great lens for portraits. Also would ideally be a good option for poorly-lit places where the aperture of the kit-lens isn't wide enough to ensure a steady shot.

CONCLUSIONS
From my list of 4 pros and 4 cons, you might wonder why I'm giving this product 5 stars?... It's because considering the great performance - and low price - of the T2i, the 'cons' I list really aren't that big of a deal. Just because some cameras offer the aforementioned features the T2i lacks, it doesn't mean the T2i isn't a solid performer. On the contrary, I have been completely satisfied with this camera's image and video quality, performance, features, AND PRICE, and would recommend the T2i to anyone looking for an affordable way to capture memories!

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EDIT 11/27/10

I just wanted to update this review to say that after shooting with the T2i for nearly half a year, I'm still as impressed by this camera as when I first got it. I have a few comments to expand on my initial review:

VIDEO I have been using the video mode a lot more than I initially expected. While it doesn't offer continuous auto-focus and therefore might not replace a camcorder, once you get the hang of manually focusing this is not a big problem. I many times have found myself in situations where photos couldn't capture the moment as well as a video could, and the ability to record clips has been very convenient.

A note on the video mode, however...while it's automatic exposure is fine for most situations, if you find your videos are grainy, it's best to manually control the exposure. I've seen that sometimes even in good lighting, the camera will keep the aperture small (to have a less shallow depth of field) and boost the ISO. You can get around that by manually adjusting exposure settings, but again, the automatic exposures are usually fine.

As for audio with videos, I personally still have not purchased an external microphone, but for those who are serious about movie production Amazon sells a highly popular 'Rode VideoMic' for a reasonable price. I have looked up videos on YouTube which demonstrate the difference between the built-in mic and an external mic, and while it's tempting, I'd rather spend my money on better lenses than audio accessories.

CROP FACTOR To clarify on my 'crop factor' point from above on a full-frame vs. a crop-sensor body, there is a useful video on Vimeo that illustrates what I'm talking about. If you Google '5D 7D crop factor Vimeo' it comes up as the first result. As you can see, a full frame camera offers a view truer to the lens designations. Again, full frame cameras are costlier to make and therefore more expensive to the consumer, so APS-C sensor cameras like the Rebel T2i, 60D, and 7D are very good values for the money. But if you are not on a tight budget and think you might one day want to upgrade to a full frame some day for the improved low-light performance, higher image quality, and wider field of view, maybe skip on a T2i and just aim for a 5D Mark II (I personally love my T2i, but am excited about some day having my 24-105 shoot wider than its current effective 38-168 range.). For most users, however, APS-C sensor cameras like the T2i should be great, and some might even find the crop factor useful for telephoto work.

LENSES After spending so much money on a camera body, many people have a difficult time justifying buying expensive lenses, and I understand that. After upgrading from the 18-55mm kit lens to the 24-105L lens, however, I can honestly say that the money is well worth it. Colors are more vivid and truer to real life than the [now noticeably] duller colors produced by the non-L lens, and I rarely use the kit lens now. Again, the 18-55 is very versatile and provides a great value, but if you can afford to upgrade your lens to Canon's L series, you won't regret it. Perhaps try before you buy, to see for yourself what I'm talking about.

LOW LIGHT While this camera offers a boost ISO mode (to 12800 from 6400), I don't use that since its results are too grainy for my liking. But for night shots without a tripod, I have found ISO 3200 and 6400 to be a real advantage over my previous Rebel XS which only went up to ISO 1600, and even then produced noisier images than the T2i at 1600. While this camera doesn't produce high ISO pictures as cleanly as a full frame 5DMk2 does, at a fraction of the price I am incredibly pleased with this camera.

MEMORY CARD Lastly, I wanted to recommend you do a lot of research into which SD card you want to use. Class 6 or higher is recommended, but look into reviews to see how the card actually performs. I used to use a Transcend Class 6 card since it's very affordable, and have had movies abruptly stop recording at inopportune times. I upgraded to a Transcend Class 10, and unfortunately continue to have that happen. Not all Class 10 cards necessarily write at the same speed, so look thoroughly into reviews if you plan on using video mode to ensure you get a reliable, high-speed card. The Transcend cards are a great value for the money, and have many times been fine, but you might want to consider more expensive alternatives for greater reliability.

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EDIT 01/28/11

I wanted to update this review to reflect the fact that the camera is still serving me well, and to recommend some additional accessories I have since paired my T2i with. I recently got the Induro AKB0 Tripod Kit (Black), Joby GP8-BHEN Gorillapod Focus with Ballhead X bundle, Dolica WT-1003 67-Inch Lightweight Monopod, and Canon EF 70-200mm f/2.8L II IS USM Telephoto Zoom Lens for Canon SLR Cameras, and highly recommend them.

CAMERA SUPPORT With the T2i you can pull off handheld shots in low light by cranking up the ISO, but even though the T2i shows relatively little noise, it does show more than some would like in their shots (especially at ISO 6400). Digital noise can be reduced in post-production, but it's much easier to shoot at a lower ISO in the first place, especially for night shots. After paying so much for a camera body and other accessories, buying an expensive tripod might be the last thing you'd want to do, and I understand that: for a while I was using an older, cheaper tripod that was designed more for light camcorders than SLRs with heavy lenses. While this set-up technically worked, I didn't feel very confident in its reliability. After doing a lot of research and asking many photographers, I got the Induro kit, and have been very happy with it so far. It is more expensive than I would have liked, but it doesn't make sense to skimp on support and risk damaging your gear! With tripods, you have to make trade-offs between price, sturdiness, and weight, and while I'm happy with my tripod, it might not be adequate for your needs. There are many websites with tips on what to look for in a tripod (i.e. ball head, pan-tilt head, etc) that can help you make an informed decision. The Gorillapod is not nearly as essential to your shooting as a dedicated tripod, but I recommend it if you find yourself in situations where you don't want to/might not be permitted to carry a tripod, but need support. It sets up much faster than a tripod which needs to have its legs extended and locked. Lastly, a monopod is a great way to stabilize your shots without the hassle of having to carry a tripod, and is even more portable than a Gorillapod. That being said, it doesn't provide as much stability, so I use it primarily to stabilize video shooting (which can be a bit shaky due to composition through LCD screen instead of viewfinder, especially with a telephoto lens).

TELEPHOTO LENS The T2i has a high resolution sensor that, in my experience, provides for great shots even after cropping. I have taken shots and cropped to 100% and been pleased with results, but sometimes you want extended reach without cropping, and here a good telephoto really shines. Canon and third-party lens manufacturers offer many great telephoto options for the T2i, and it's important to think of what you need a telephoto lens for before investing in one. If you'll primarily be shooting with a tripod, you probably don't need IS; if you're going to be shooting in adequate light, a wide aperture isn't essential. I used the Canon 70-300 non-L non-IS lens, but don't recommend it. Keeping in mind the reciprocity of focal length and shutter speed, Image Stabilization on a telephoto lens makes things much easier for hand-held shooting. I much preferred the 55-250 IS over my 70-300 non-IS (there are also IS versions of the 70-300), but found its low-light performance was weak due to its relatively small maximum aperture size. I recently got the 70-200 2.8 IS II, and am blown away by its fast auto-focus, great low-light performance, and superior optical quality. It is an expensive lens, but is well worth it if you need a fast lens (wide aperture) that features Image Stabilization.

--------------------------
EDIT 02/07/11 *FINAL UPDATE*

NEW REBEL The T2i's successor, the T3i has just been announced, and will be available in March. Based on its specs, I don't think this is a necessary upgrade for current T2i owners. The main improvements found in the T3i are a swiveling screen, wireless flash transmitter, improved Auto mode detection, an enhanced Movie Zoom mode, and creative filters. Of these, I think the most important or sought-after improvements are the flash transmitter (which is is great for advanced shooters and those who want to explore with lighting) and the swiveling LCD screen (which allows for more flexibility in shooting). While these are useful new features, they are largely incremental and I will be sticking with my T2i. For new buyers, the T3i looks great and is very worth looking into when it comes out. Canon also announced a T3 camera to succeed the Rebel XS, which is great for beginners but is lacking in features compared to the T2i and the newly-announced T3i, including the ability to capture 'true HD' at 1080. Even with Canon's recent announcements, I think the T2i is a great DSLR and I highly recommend it to everyone.

----------------------------
EDIT 06/13/11 *THIS REALLY IS THE FINAL UPDATE*

I know this review is now longer than some novels, but I really can't stress enough how great this camera is. I've used this in a variety of settings, both professionally and for personal use, and it's served me so well throughout. While I've shot events before, last night I shot the Tony Awards in NYC...which meant many thousands of shots over the course of many hours...and I was highly impressed with the T2i's performance. I did have to change batteries during the course of the event, but that was many hours into the event. You can easily get a spare third-party battery for just a few bucks.

I recently purchased a cheap (less than 20 dollars) intervalometer from Amazon, and have started creating time-lapse videos with my T2i. Setting up cool time-lapse, and capturing HD video, are two areas where an articulating screen (like that found on the T3i and 60D) would come in handy, but again, this is not an essential feature, so I am pleased with my T2i. The intervalometer I got through Amazon was third-party, but since it cost about a tenth of the official Canon one, I am very pleased and highly recommend it if you want to take your T2i to the next level.

The T2i is an amazing camera. I highly recommend it to anyone and everyone who is even remotely interested, whether you never owned an SLR before, or want a second body as a backup. I love the T2i!
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385 of 392 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Great Upgrade (coming from an XSI), April 16, 2010
By 
I just got this camera today (finally an available body only since I have no use for the kit lens) and I am awed. I had done a lot of research on this before buying it so I knew what to expect in terms of both the big upgrade issues as well as the little tweaks they have done, some of which turn out to be really terrific. If you are coming from another Canon the menus and interface will be second nature. Based on another very positive review just posted, coming from Nikon it's also an easy step. Here are some early observations:

The Best:
A huge bump in ISO. This was one of the two main reasons I upgraded from my trusty (and still good) XSI. I have made some test shots and despite going up to an 18 MP sensor the noise is not much of an issue and I shot several pics at ISO 3200 which look quite good. I then shot some in 6400 which did start to show some noise in the low light but still made for serviceable pictures. I am looking forward to seeing what it will do around a campfire at an upcoming camping trip with my daughter! My XSI despite a F/2.8 lens could not do much with that in the past.

The other main draw for me was video. I dream of being able to bring just one camera to, say, Disney and have it do double duty and I think this one may do it. So far, I have only shot a couple scenes in fairly low light and focus is a bit of a challenge but by zooming in and allowing the camera to come to focus before the shot it is manageable. I expect this to not be as much of an issue in brighter light. Be sure to enable auto focus during video in the menu - I suspect it is disabled by default due to the noise many lenses make with focusing as that would be recorded as well. I have two USM / "L" lenses so that should not be a problem for me but your milage may vary. I also plan to try some manual focusing. Keep in mind that video clips for full 1080P 30 FPS are limited to about 12 minutes - I worried about this a bit until I realized that when I edit my videos shots are rarely longer than 4 minutes (and of that I usually keep just 2 or less). That said, this camera is not the one to choose to record, say, a stage production. For that a dedicated video camera able to record an hour or more at a time is a must.

The Good:
Better Live View - Live view mode is now much more accessible and in more modes.

Sensor Size - 18 MP sensor is nice for cropping and taking full advantage of "L" glass if you have it. Other than that, this is not a major draw from my perspective. I would actually have preferred this be a 12 MP camera allowing low-noise great pics to, say, over 20000 ISO.

Memory Type - This camera uses SD type cards including the new ultrahigh capacity cards. I know it is a small matter but I like being able to use the cards I have rather than having to but some expensive CF cards (such as used by the 7D). Keep in mind that they recommend Class 6 or higher cards for video (I got a couple 16 GB Class 10 cards for about $40 each which should fit the bill). I'll use my older cards just for stills.

Stereo Mic Input - This allows the option of using a better mic than the built in mic. I may never take advantage of that but I suspect I will, actually. Of course, inclusion of a stereo mic would have been even better!

Misc - A lot of little things about this camera already impress me. For example, they moved the "no flash" setting on the main dial to right next to full auto and my most used setting "portrait" mode and away from the far end since they realized a lot of people use it (that's according to a video I saw online with a Canon employee). There are a lot of little touches like that which I have already noticed.

The Bad: (really not so bad in many ways)
The build quality is not 7D (which I have just handled at a store). The magnesium body on that bad boy just makes it feel very solid and by comparison the T2i does feel not cheap but does feel light. On the other hand less weight is good (especially at places like Disney) and this camera is appropriately being labeled a "baby 7D" in terms of sensor chip, etc. Of course, having an extra $1000 in your pocket (or not on your charge card) is another huge advantage over the 7D.

It is not a full frame camera. This means there is a "crop factor" due to the chip size which effectively multiplies by 1.6 the focal length of lens you are using (as compared to 35 mm film cameras or full-frame cameras like the 5D Mk II. Since I was coming from an XSI which of course is also a smaller sensor for me there is no transition to make here.

In summary, I am VERY pleased with this purchase and expect this to be my camera body until my ultimate camera is released (full frame, stereo mic, uses SD cards, useable ISO to >100,000 all for under $1000 - I know, I know this is a pipe dream now but an (old) kid can dream, can't he?)

UPDATE: I have had this camera for a couple weeks now and have had the opportunity to shoot hundreds of pictures and quite a few videos. I am still very impressed. Stills are great and the focusing is markedly improved over the XSI. The only blurry shots I get are when panning to follow my dogs running among trees - to the sensor the trees seem to be moving and are deemed the subject - stopping down the lens to increase DOF (or just taking a whole bunch of pictures) is the easy fix.

Now, regarding video. It is more challenging than I thought to use a DSLR camera for video. This is more an ergonomic issue with the form factor for the camera than any issue with the T2i itself. Video is of course composed by looking at the LCD screen and so the camera must be held out a bit - and with the weight of a good lens it gets pretty heavy in contrast to typical small camcorders of today. Thinking about it, modern video cameras have gotten to this stage of evolution after over 20 years (anyone remember the old VHS camcorders?), so I guess it is to be expected there would be a difference. Focus is not quick like it is with a good video camera but seems best achieved to me anyway with manual focus. The large, bright LCD screen helps in this regard. The quality of the resulting video is excellent. Although I don't see this as replacing my Sony HD video camera for day-to-day and holiday recording I do think that it will be useable to take the role of both still and video camera during an upcoming trip to Disney. I also suspect as I get more used to it that the ease of use will increase further and perhaps one day it will be my only video camera. Overall, this is a great product and I remain very pleased.

UPDATE 2-27-2011
Thanks to all for the positive feedback on this review! I am updating after many months with this great camera. I have taken thousands of pictures and continue to be amazed at the quality. The T3i is now coming out and to me appears to be the same camera with a couple upgrades. One feature which may be of interest is the ability to trigger external flash units from the camera itself (the T2i can't do this); but I suspect most people shooting in the studio will have that covered in some other way already. I think the most exciting feature of the T3i is an articulating LCD screen on the back. If you plan to use this camera for a lot of video this may be worth the additional cost. Please note that most of the limitations in my review above for T2i still apply, however. I am hoping for some method of rapid autofocus on a future model. If like me you shoot mostly stills and use the video "in a pinch" or when you desire VERY high quality video - then my recommendation would be to get the T2i and put the money saved into a nice prime lens or perhaps put it away for some "L" glass zooms. This camera works great with the 24-70 and 70-200 f2.8 zooms, by the way, the combination for me is unbeatable.

As a side note, if you happen to have any 16 GB Class 10 SD cards from AData (as I did) please check out reviews before trusting them with the recording of any important pictures / video.
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352 of 365 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent photo camera! Video...hmmm, March 4, 2010
This review is from: Canon EOS Rebel T2i DSLR Camera with EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS Lens (OLD MODEL) (Camera)
First, I have an extensive background in both photography and video. I was looking for a smaller camera to carry around that could also shoot video. When I heard about this one I thought it would be perfect and it is good, very good BUT its does have its issues... I will try to keep this short and to the point.

Pros:

1. Superb image quality in both photos and video.
You can expect image quality comparable to a Canon Pro DSLR.
And I am not just saying that. I actually did compare it to our 1Ds MkII.
This camera can produces usable images up to ISO 3200. Noise is there but they
do a good job of controlling it. With this said, it would be noted that there
really isn't that much difference between a Canon 20D and the most expensive DSLR
for photos that will be displayed on the web or in regular size prints.
If you don't really need video then you can save yourself a lot of money and just
get a used 20D :) I actually still have my original 20D as a backup.

2. Amazingly, the 18-55 kit lens turned out to be remarkably good. How good?
Well, within the center area of the frame it would give the more expensive lens a run for their money :)
Where it begins to break down is in corner detail but this is to be expected.
The focusing is also too noisy to use for video, IF you are recording sound.

UPDATE: if you are looking to upgrade the lens, I can recommended the Canon 15-85 IS.

3. The built in mic is also very good. Even on regular video cameras this is almost a universal weakness.
If you are looking for a better mic I can recommend the Rode SVM Stereo Video Mic.
Works very well with this camera, unlike the Audio Technica 24CM. Its not cheap but good mics never are.
On all of these cameras hiss is a problem to varying degrees especially when recording in a quiet environment.
The quiter the source the more you will hear it. The only way to get remove it is to use an external audio
record like the Zoom H4N or do it in software with something like SoundSoap.

4. Light weight compared to the higher end Canon bodies.

5. Amazing low light video capability. With a fast lens f2.8 or lower even a Pro video camera can't touch it.
So if shooting in dark places is a big requirement then these cameras are the way to go.

Cons:

1. This is my biggest problem. I personally find the small body a lot more difficult to handle than the larger
Canon cameras we have. Maybe I am just use to the larger bodies but they are a lot more natural and easier
to work with. If you shoot pro or semi pro get the 7D just for this reason. The battery grip will help.
I have small hands so I hate to think how it would feel with someone that has large hands. I would highly recommend
you go somewhere and play with the T2i just to see how it feels in your hands.

UPDATE: The BG-E8 battery grip makes a big difference in this regard!

2. For my personal taste I find the T2i to over expose a bit. This could be related to the Peripheral Illumination
Correction, Highlight Priority, etc. I usually just under expose by 1/3 of a stop to compensate for this.

3. My 2nd big disappointment is the video. The video quality is superb this is not the issue. Where the problem lies
is in actually using the camera as a video camera. It has two big problems in this regard: the manual zoom and lack
of auto focus. It is practically impossible to hold the camera steady and do a smooth zoom in or out. Panning and zooming
at the same time is almost impossible. A regular video camera have electronic zoom controls that allows you to zoom
in and out very smoothly. The other problem is lack of auto focus. Sure you can refocus manually but again very difficult
to hold the camera steady and focus. Using the camera auto focus in video mode is possible but its really slow and
the mic will pick up the noise from the lens as it hunts for the focus. For me, this means, the camera is more useful
for recording short video clips not a full video shoot e.g. shooting a whole wedding. I don't feel it can replace a regular
video camera as yet. For example, if you are thinking of using this camera to shoot your kids running around, it can do it,
but there will be a lot of out of focus parts because it cannot track a subject like a regular video camera can and you
won't be able to adjust the focus quickly enough either.

UPDATE: the video can work for the most part, IF you shoot with the intent of editing the final video. A SLR will require
a bit more post production work than a regular video camera but the video quality will be superior. It works more like
a professional film camera they use in movies than the video cameras we know. But with that said, this camera still has
some real issues. Neither the shutter or aperture is continuous. You can only change them in 1/3 intervals...enough to
cause a jump in exposure in many instances. On top of that you cannot change anything without recording the clicking
noise the dial makes when you change the values. If you are using the mic in or on the camera this is a problem.
With this camera you have to setup a scene, setup your exposure, set your focus, and shoot the scene. Don't plan on
making any changes while you are shooting. So while the manual control is nice its not usable while shooting a scene.

If you can live with the Cons. Its a great camera that offers image quality comparable to any high end Canon model.
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231 of 248 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars You can't get better than this for under $1000, March 2, 2010
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Canon EOS Rebel T2i DSLR Camera with EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS Lens (OLD MODEL) (Camera)
I'm a frequent upgrader and loyal Canon fan. I traded up from an XSi last year to the T1i, and now this year to the T2i. I was within days of ordering the 7D until they announced the T2i, with all the features I wanted from the 7D at half the cost. I immediately pre-ordered the T2i and have been having some fun with it over the last 24 hours. The verdict so far? I am in love with this SLR.

I believe the last few iterations in the Rebel series have been comparable in quality. The T2i shares much of the same pros and cons with its predecessors, and ultimately, not too much has really changed. That said, the very minor things that did change were huge to me. I'm big into video, which is what got me looking into the 7D. Both the 7D and the T2i have the stereo audio input jack. My T1i just had the built-in mono mic which was unacceptable for someone who is doing more than home videos with this camera. So that feature, along with full manual control of video recording (not available in T1i), and 1080/24p (and 30p if that's your preference) makes this a common sense upgrade if you're serious about video. 720p/60 is also really cool for the silky smooth framerate, although I personally find the movie-like feel of 24p video best.

As for what the camera is really made for, still photography, it is still the king at (in the mid-entry-level DSLR class). 18 megapixels really, truly is more than any person really needs. My XSi from a couple years back met all my needs with 12mp, however, 18 creates for even better bragging rights to the general public. "How many megapixies is that thingy? Eighteen? OMG! You are such a pro!" Anyway, back on track now. The noise levels in most photos I've taken are pretty decent for 18 megapixels. It's comparable to the noise on the 15MP T1i from what I've experienced so far. 6400 ISO is now a default option instead of an expanded setting (12800 ISO still is), which is nice to have, though you'll hopefully never have to use it.

The kit lens is of course the same old 18-55 I've bought practically 5 times over now. A great budget lens and excellent value, but I absolutely can't go back to using it after buying some of the better lenses Canon has to offer. If the money's there, you will not regret investing another few hundred dollars some better glass. Otherwise, the 18-55 is a great lens to start out with.

Only major complaint I have is the white balance in incandescent lighting still isn't as accurate as I'd like. I also wish they kept the same LP-E5 battery so the two I already have would be compatible with both of my cameras. And a nitpick, the "Rebel" name is stupid, to be completely honest. It should be named "550D" as it is in the Europe market. SDXC support is cool, but I can't really comment on it as I'll be using SDHC cards for the foreseeable future. Oh, and the slightly redesigned buttons are a welcome change. A little more ergonomic than before.

In conclusion, if you're thinking about upgrading from a T1i, there isn't really a compelling reason to unless you are okay spending hundreds just for the sake of having the latest in gadgetry (what I do), UNLESS you are in it for the video support, which is AMAZING at this price point. You used to have to spend at least a couple thousand on a professional camcorder to get the kind of video support that you can now get in a consumer DSLR at a very reasonable price. Thanks, Canon! Oh, and amazon got it to me super fast too!
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85 of 88 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent Beginner's DSLR, September 29, 2010
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
Excellent camera, though a bit expensive - worth every penny.

Pros:
- The 18-135mm lens is a nice upgrade to the standard kit 18-55mm lens. Especially if this is your first DSLR, and you don't want to spend more money on lenses. It is also good for trips, taking pictures of kids, or in any other situation where you don't want to change lenses. (And you save about $100 when purchasing this kit, compared to body + 18-135mm Canon lens).
- Performance. Minimal shutter lag, good low-light performance, nice video.
- Relatively light (about 1 kg / 2 pounds with lens), again good for trips.

Cons:
- Price
- Built-in flash is not so great. Also when taking pictures on wide angle setting, lens creates a shade.
- No autofocus when zooming while taking video, pressing shutter button half way focuses the picture.
- Focus in live picture mode is slow (even slower than on most point and shoot cameras)

Other Recommendations:
- Make sure to get UV filter (mostly for protecting the lens), and a spare battery (I've got the Opteka one for ~$13).
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108 of 116 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A solid camera!...with one caveat, April 16, 2010
Just got my T2i/550D. Tested it with a few shots using my trusty 28-135mm IS lens. Other people have already highly praised this camera. For those looking to decide whether not to upgrade from XSI (or any other camera), here's a run down:

1) AUTOFOCUS:
the T2i's autofocus beats the XSI hands down. I've had the xsi for two years and while i was happy with it overall, there were often moments of soft shots. Do a search for "front-focus"...it'll show a lot of threads that was problematic of the XSI. No such issues with the T2i. It locks on focus quickly and effortlessly and pictures turn out very sharp using my 28-135mm IS lens. I can get quality shots even at 1/10s handheld and 3200 iso in low light, but that's also dependent on the IS of the lens.

2) METERING
The T2i inherits the 7d's metering system. I like it. color tones are more accurate and appropriate to reflect how an object really looks. One thing to consider, if you accidently set white balance to incandescent light while u take shots w/o flash and happen to use flash on the image, the end result will be a picture w/ a heavy blue cast. If it's shot in raw, easily edited in dpp.

3) EXPOSURE
I have a gut feeling that the T2i's sensor is a tad bit over sensitive causing pictures to be slightly over-exposed compared to my XSI. I think i'll learn with time. On a typical shot, I think the XSI has a color that's a tad bit richer/pleasing in jpeg. Haven't tried out raw. Still tweaking the settings of my t2i.

4) BATTERY LIFE
Haven't tried it long enuff and will comment later. The charger has a cord. I suspect it might be canon's way of saving money to allow for different cords to be shipped w/ different units depending on the country. On first charge, i got out 400 shots w/ about 20 being flash shots when battery meter was at half. I had another event to go to so I recharged it at that point. Took about 1-2 hrs to recharge. For those looking to generic batteries, there's discussions on dpreview of generic batteries from ebay that last 600 shots while battery meter still being full. After that, it sharply goes down in half and empty so a little more unpredictable than the canon ones but battery life still terrific.

5) BUILD QUALITY
Seems almost as sturdy as the XSI. However, noticed battery door on T2i seems a bit loose and not snug like XSI. The little knob on the right next to the shutter (that you use to adjust the AF points) seems more sturdy on the xsi than the T2i. i.e. on the T2i, if u apply a bit of pressure, it rocks a bit but doesn't do the same on my old xsi.

6) LCD
The t2i's lcd screen is amazing. Very vibrant and lots of pixels. Much better than XSI's. I'd recommend getting an lcd protector (plastic film) to add here. I'd recommend you get a 3.5 to 4" lcd protector and cut it out to fit the LCD screen. The ones on ebay that advertise "T2i screen protector" tend to be 1-2mm smaller than advertised since the LCD borders itself slightly curved.

7) VALUE
At $799 for camera alone, this is the best value u can get right now for a camera that does 1080p video. The technology is here to stay. Best thing about this camera are 1) video at 1080p 2) 7d's metering system 3) usable iso 3200 that looks better than iso 400 on my canon point and shoot. Getting the camera alone is hard if you already have a set of lenses for this camera. If you decide to get the kit lens instead (18-55mm IS), you can sell the kit lens for around $90-100.

8)SOFTWARE
The main thing I use is DPP to process RAW. One major fault with it is that you need 1024x768 screen to install/run it. As a result, it won't run on my netbook unless I attach a hdtv or external monitor to it. I have the Lenovo S10-2. Works fine on my regular laptop. You can also use EOS Utility to added your name/contact info to all the images taken.

9) VIDEO
To be honest, video recording isn't very intuitive the first time I tried it. You have to turn the knob to the video recorder icon. Then you pressure the button for live view/red dot to record. It doesn't say the amount of time you've recorded unless you press the DISP button. You can also take photos during the recording by pressing the shutter button but that will add noise to video. Now that I've gotten used to it, not a major problem and makes sense. The AF mechanism of the 28-125 mm IS lens constantly makes noise during this time.

10) MEMORY CARD
I use a Sandisk Extreme III Class 6 SDHC 8 gb/4gb card. Takes all my videos w/o problems even at 1920x1080 at 30 fps.

SOME CONCERNS:
A) WHITE DOTS
For those new to this camera, at high ISO i.e. 3200+, you will see intermittent white dots that appear out of nowhere. It's like white speckles. This can be seen on dpreview's review of the t2i on 3200 ISO and even on the 7d. These are noise/hot pixels, and not dead pixels. You can either remove them in photoshop using the dust/scratch removal w/ radius 1 and threshold 10. Or, you can turn on high ISO noise reduction. You don't need to send the camera to manufacturer for this issue.

B) OVEREXPOSURE
I have the gut feeling that this camera's ultra sensitive senors tends to overexposed. Outdoors, I'd have to change the exposure compensation a bit up to -1 to get the desired exposure. Of note, where the focus points are centered also determines what metering is done for the image.

C) SLOW AUTOFOCUS WITH CONTRAST DETECT
AF using the contrast detect method w/ Liveview is slow and noisy. However, it's improved over XSI and easier to engage. Just press the Live view icon and start shooting.

D) NO MINI-HDMI CABLE IN BOX TO STREAM TO TV
I didn't find an mini-HDMI cable in my camera to stream to tv. Ordered one through ebay for $5. For $900, you would think they'd include this.

E) RED AUTOFOCUS POINTS APPEAR BLURRY:
When you look through the viewfinder, you'll sometimes notice that the AF points are blurry, particularly the lower ones which has appearance of reddish halo around them. This is likely due to diffraction and should not affect the ability of camera to focus properly.

F) POSSIBLE FRONT FOCUS ISSUE:
One poster on dpreview claims that the camera front focuses on fast lenses such as the 50mm f/1.4 lens. Read the thread for details. Personally, I've used the 28-135mm IS lens w/o focusing issues.
[...]
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54 of 56 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Deservedly top of the line, March 17, 2010
By 
Photoleif (colorado, usa) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Canon EOS Rebel T2i DSLR Camera with EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS Lens (OLD MODEL) (Camera)
Many good things have been said about this camera. It is superlative in most ways that count for most users. See the other reviews for details of just how excellent a camera this is. I'll instead offer a few summary opinions and observations:

1) Upgrading from an XTi or higher will be very easy for you -- same lenses, many similar controls

2) Don't expect wonders from the kit lens. It is noisy, cheap-feeling, has a primitive and slow USM, uses a plastic (not metal) bayonet, and hunts hopelessly when autofocusing in anything but ideal light. It is altogether not worth the $100. Getting the camera now, is.

3) ISO response really is amazing. ISO 800 with my XTi is like ISO 3200 with the T2i. ISO 12800 is entirely usable in a pinch. It is not the horror story you might expect. You can also push it two stops further to the equivalent of 51,200, though I can say the results are ugly. They are the same kind of ugly that an XTi pushed two stops results in, with its ISO6400 equivalent push. These comparisons are based on visual comparison between non-noise reduced images. When you apply even mild NR using the DPP software, ISO12,800 quickly becomes a viable tool, rather than the butt of jokes.

4) Auto-ISO is finally here! Canon implemented it right, where you the user can limit the auto-selectable range.

5) Adobe has not caught up to the latest .CR2 RAW file format as of this writing (3/17). The latest ACR is 5.6, and we really really need a 5.7 patch for CS4. Until that is released, you'll need to scrape by with other plugins or programs.

6) Video capabilities meet high expectations. Do however follow the booklet instructions and use at least a SD class 6 card (class 10 preferable). I'm using a class 6 and get some jerkiness at 720p. It just can't keep up. So don't blame the camera until you give it a big pipe to write to.

7) Remote control? Impressively, yes. If you have a long USB cable, you can make some use of the EOS Utility software's remote control functionality, which includes controlling not only the normal features of the camera, but as well, you can schedule photos to be taken periodically (think time-lapse). You also use this software to register your name and copyright statement, if you wish, as imprints on every photo's EXIF.

Overall a great purchase, well worth its price for ISO response and 18 megapixels, but it offers quite a bit more. I'm very pleased.

2012-Feb-28 update. I'm still using the T2i, and still pleased with it. Adobe of course has released a new RAW plugin and in fact if you're running CS4, you have to forever stay with the 5.7 beta since higher versions aren't CS4-compatible. I have switched entirely to class 10 SDHC cards to avoid video write issues and quickly empty the buffer when taking shots in quick succession. I stand by my comments about the kit lens, though to its credit it actually produces sharper images than my 28-70L glass. Yes, really. I've tested that using a USAF test target. It's not a good scene when a kit lens outperforms L glass.
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54 of 57 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fabulous Camera! Better than XSI!, April 12, 2010
This review is from: Canon EOS Rebel T2i DSLR Camera with EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS Lens (OLD MODEL) (Camera)
Just got my T2i/550D. Tested it with a few shots using my trusty 28-135mm IS lens. Other people have already highly praised this camera. For those looking to decide whether not to upgrade from XSI (or any other camera), here's a run down:

1) AUTOFOCUS:
the T2i's autofocus beats the XSI hands down. I've had the xsi for two years and while i was happy with it overall, there were often moments of soft shots. Do a search for "front-focus"...it'll show a lot of threads that was problematic of the XSI. No such issues with the T2i. It locks on focus quickly and effortlessly and pictures turn out very sharp using my 28-135mm IS lens. I can get quality shots even at 1/10s handheld and 3200 iso in low light, but that's also dependent on the IS of the lens.

2) METERING
The T2i inherits the 7d's metering system. I like it. color tones are more accurate and appropriate to reflect how an object really looks. One thing to consider, if you accidently set white balance to incandescent light while u take shots w/o flash and happen to use flash on the image, the end result will be a picture w/ a heavy blue cast. If it's shot in raw, easily edited in dpp.

3) EXPOSURE
I have a gut feeling that the T2i's sensor is a tad bit over sensitive causing pictures to be slightly over-exposed compared to my XSI. I think i'll learn with time. On a typical shot, I think the XSI has a color that's a tad bit richer/pleasing in jpeg. Haven't tried out raw. Still tweaking the settings of my t2i.

4) BATTERY LIFE
Haven't tried it long enuff and will comment later. The charger has a cord. I suspect it might be canon's way of saving money to allow for different cords to be shipped w/ different units depending on the country. On first charge, i got out 400 shots w/ about 20 being flash shots when battery meter was at half. I had another event to go to so I recharged it at that point. Took about 1-2 hrs to recharge. For those looking to generic batteries, there's discussions on dpreview of generic batteries from ebay that last 600 shots while battery meter still being full. After that, it sharply goes down in half and empty so a little more unpredictable than the canon ones but battery life still terrific.

5) BUILD QUALITY
Seems almost as sturdy as the XSI. However, noticed battery door on T2i seems a bit loose and not snug like XSI. The little knob on the right next to the shutter (that you use to adjust the AF points) seems more sturdy on the xsi than the T2i. i.e. on the T2i, if u apply a bit of pressure, it rocks a bit but doesn't do the same on my old xsi.

6) LCD
The t2i's lcd screen is amazing. Very vibrant and lots of pixels. Much better than XSI's. I'd recommend getting an lcd protector (plastic film) to add here. I'd recommend you get a 3.5 to 4" lcd protector and cut it out to fit the LCD screen. The ones on ebay that advertise "T2i screen protector" tend to be 1-2mm smaller than advertised since the LCD borders itself slightly curved.

7) VALUE
At $799 for camera alone, this is the best value u can get right now for a camera that does 1080p video. The technology is here to stay. Best thing about this camera are 1) video at 1080p 2) 7d's metering system 3) usable iso 3200 that looks better than iso 400 on my canon point and shoot. Getting the camera alone is hard if you already have a set of lenses for this camera. If you decide to get the kit lens instead (18-55mm IS), you can sell the kit lens for around $90-100.

8)SOFTWARE
The main thing I use is DPP to process RAW. One major fault with it is that you need 1024x768 screen to install/run it. As a result, it won't run on my netbook unless I attach a hdtv or external monitor to it. I have the Lenovo S10-2. Works fine on my regular laptop. You can also use EOS Utility to added your name/contact info to all the images taken.

9) VIDEO
To be honest, video recording isn't very intuitive the first time I tried it. You have to turn the knob to the video recorder icon. Then you pressure the button for live view/red dot to record. It doesn't say the amount of time you've recorded unless you press the DISP button. You can also take photos during the recording by pressing the shutter button but that will add noise to video. Now that I've gotten used to it, not a major problem and makes sense. The AF mechanism of the 28-125 mm IS lens constantly makes noise during this time.

10) MEMORY CARD
I use a Sandisk Extreme III Class 6 SDHC 8 gb/4gb card. Takes all my videos w/o problems even at 1920x1080 at 30 fps.

SOME CONCERNS:
A) WHITE DOTS
For those new to this camera, at high ISO i.e. 3200+, you will see intermittent white dots that appear out of nowhere. It's like white speckles. This can be seen on dpreview's review of the t2i on 3200 ISO and even on the 7d. These are noise/hot pixels, and not dead pixels. You can either remove them in photoshop using the dust/scratch removal w/ radius 1 and threshold 10. Or, you can turn on high ISO noise reduction. You don't need to send the camera to manufacturer for this issue.

B) OVEREXPOSURE
I have the gut feeling that this camera's ultra sensitive senors tends to overexposed. Outdoors, I'd have to change the exposure compensation a bit up to -1 to get the desired exposure. Of note, where the focus points are centered also determines what metering is done for the image.

C) SLOW AUTOFOCUS WITH CONTRAST DETECT
AF using the contrast detect method w/ Liveview is slow and noisy. However, it's improved over XSI and easier to engage. Just press the Live view icon and start shooting.

D) NO MINI-HDMI CABLE IN BOX TO STREAM TO TV
I didn't find an mini-HDMI cable in my camera to stream to tv. Ordered one through ebay for $5. For $900, you would think they'd include this.

E) RED AUTOFOCUS POINTS APPEAR BLURRY:
When you look through the viewfinder, you'll sometimes notice that the AF points are blurry, particularly the lower ones which has appearance of reddish halo around them. This is likely due to diffraction and should not affect the ability of camera to focus properly.
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38 of 39 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Camera Great - Don't let SD card limit performance, July 13, 2010
By 
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
I have done a lot of photography but not at the level that this camera allows. I purchased this camera on Amazon about two weeks ago, along with various lens. After reading the manual and purchasing David Busch's Guide to the use of the T2i David Busch's Canon Rebel EOS T2i/550D Guide to Digital Photography, Softcover Book by David Busch, I have come to appreciate the level of this camera's sophistication. All that having been said, I will leave the more complex assessments to others who are more qualified than I to comment on the camera itself.

My comment deals with the SD card you will need for this camera. My advise to purchasers of this camera is to purchase the fastest SD card you can get. I ordered a Class 10 Sandisk Extreme 16gig card, SanDisk 16GB Extreme - SDHC Class 10 High Performance memory card (SDSDX3-016G-P31, Retail Packaging) - NEW 30MB/s version and used it exclusively. I was very happy with the quickness of the continuous shooting. I shot a swim meet, and got a great selection of shots. The next day, I inadvertently left the Class 10 card at home, and substituted a Transcend Class 6 16gig card. The difference in the camera's performance was a revelation to me. With the class 6 card the camera took longer to cycle through its opening sequence, the continuous shooting speed was far slower, and after about 10 shots the speed slowed down to a crawl.

The bottom line is to spend the extra bucks and purchase a class 10 SD card. Your camera will be happy and so will you.
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40 of 42 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Lots of research; concluded this is "the one", March 27, 2010
By 
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Canon EOS Rebel T2i DSLR Camera with EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS Lens (OLD MODEL) (Camera)
This camera is as fantastic as the other 5-star reviewers have indicated. I was a young amateur SLR hobby-photographer 20 years ago; I mostly stopped buying film but never purchased anything more than a compact digital point'n'shoot for mediocre memory-shots. This DSLR was worth the wait. I buy a lot at Amazon but don't review much; this is an exception. I'll try not to reiterate too much, but I'll endorse some of the points in other reviews, and then offer some of my own thoughts.

Endorsements:

* Indeed, image quality is fantastic; 18MP is not "too much" for the APS-C-size sensor. Low-light performance is also great. But rather than listening to my broad statements (or those of other reviewers), Just read through the many pages of www.[amazon removed the website name - but it's the same review site that they feature near the top of this camera's page, or if you just google for "digital photography reviews" it should be the first hit].com review, including the comparisons with "competitor" cameras. The bottom line: is the T2i light-years better than all competitors at a similar price: no; but is it very good, often equaling its own master-at-twice-the-price EOS 7D: YES!

* No, no stereo mic and silent lens operation like the Panasonic GH1, but the standard stereo mic jack resolves this for me. If I want fantastic sound, then I want two mics on a stereo mic bar out on a boom anyway. In fact, I prefer this mic-input over the high-quality built-in stereo mic of the GH1 (and the few other new-comers that boast built-in stereo mics).

* I will side with those who appreciate the video qualities of the camera. No, it's probably not the right camera for taping the kids' full basketball games (in 1080p HD!?), where you may want electronic zoom and quiet auto-focus (though a better lens would help with the auto-focus problem a little). But if you wonder what kind of masterpiece videos can be taken with this gem, google around for T2i videos and prepare to be awed. The community of artistic videographers is having a hay-day with the T2i, Panasonic GH1/GF1, and a (very) few others. These stand out in a class of their own. And the T2i, with 60fps 720p stands on its own, really, enabling some incredible slow-motion effects. Indeed, as has been mentioned, you can't get an interchangeable-lens video camera with a large sensor like this for anywhere near the price of this camera. Oh, and yes, make sure you have at least a Class-6 SD card, preferably Class-10, apparently (though I only have a Class-6 card and it's done ok so far), before you blame the camera for choppiness, and make sure you have a fast computer with a fast video-card before you blame the camera for taking unwatchable video.

* Indeed, indoor auto-white-balance doesn't seem perfect. But the auto-ISO works pretty well; thank you Canon for the ability to limit the ceiling on it - that makes it worth using.

My additional thoughts:

* Yes, the body is light. It's not a professional all-magnesium brick that you can leave out in the snow and rain every night as one reviewer elsewhere likes to do with his professional Canons. But it's also not entirely "plastic", as some reviewers suggest. It's a stainless steel chassis (though who knows what gauge) with a polycarbonate resin / glass fiber shell (ok, yeah, plastic). It does "feel" light enough to be all plastic. I wouldn't treat it like a professional brick, but I also appreciate the advantages of its light weight. In my opinion: it feels light without feeling cheap. Of course, compared to a solid Magnesium, I might be inclined to say it feels cheap. To hold, that is. The function of the controls does _not_ feel cheap. Also worth noting: I have medium-small hands and have no trouble operating all of the controls _with_ thin gloves on; the profile and controls may not be acceptable to the largest-handed pro photographers, but I wouldn't read too much into those negative comments. And, finally, I, too, can't wait for camera-armor to produce a mold for the T2i (with the cutout for the new video button) so that I don't have to worry as much that the body isn't brick solid.

* The kit lens may be relatively slow at f3.5 and may be plastic, but it really is a great start lens its price. You'll find a faster (f1.8) plastic lens for the same price, but it won't have image-stabilization (though the argument that you won't need it at f1.8 has some merit). It really is quite sharp, for the money. It does hunt a little for (auto-)focus in imperfect conditions, but it's not clear to me (yet) that this is all the fault of the lens. The hunting _noise_ (audible noise, that is), on the other hand, clearly marks it as an inexpensive lens.

* Battery: I don't have enough experience with it yet to comment much on its performance, other than to refer to the stats according to CIPA standards. But I did notice that you can choose your background color for the LCD, where settings are displayed. I changed mine from the default white background to a dark background. If my hypothesis is right, this will save a little power. You can also reduce the amount of time a shot is displayed on the LCD after it's taken. Or you can turn the LCD off altogether, which is likely to save a healthy bit of juice.

Like I said: I'll leave a great deal unsaid because other reviewers have already said it. I did a lot of research over the last 5 monhttp://www.amazon.com/review/edit-reviewths and finally concluded that this newcomer was "the one" for me. Still, I watched developments for a few more weeks before making my purchase. Bottom line: this is a 5-star purchase.

UPDATE: I emailed camera-armor, and they reported: "We currently do not have any plans on releasing Camera Armor for the Canon T2i. We apologize for the disappointment." But they say to stay tuned for new products. Perhaps the plans are around the corner even if the product is not as near as hoped. I'd be interested in knowing how well the Xsi/T1i's armor (MADE Products CA-1135-BLK Camera Armor for Canon XSI Digital SLR Cameras (Black)) would work -- it looks to me like the movie-record button might be covered, but otherwise the fit might be right. I haven't found any comments on this anywhere.
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