Canon EOS Rebel T1i 15.1 MP CMOS Digital SLR Camera with 3-Inch LCD (Body Only)
Used & New from: $250.00
Canon Ti1 + which lens?? Let me start out by saying that I am an ametuer who is moving from my Canon S5IS (which I have been very happy with) to the Ti1. Problem is that since I am new to the SLR world I have no idea about lens. What I do know is that the kit lens does not offer the range I am use to and desire. Am I wrong in thinking I'd be wasting a a lot of the $700+ piece of equipment just using the kit lens?

I am looking to pick up either of these 2 lenses with my purchase.

Canon EF-S 18-200mm f/3.5-5.6 IS Standard Zoom
or
Tamron AF 18-270mm f/3.5-6.3 Di II VC LD Aspherical IF Macro

The kit and either lens is much more than I want to spend but I figure I can get the Canon EF-S 55-250mm f/4.0-5.6 IS for $55 after the $200 rebate and get the printer for $46 after rebate and turn around and sell them on ebay to bring the total cost down a bit. Am I wrong in thinking the 55-250mm is not enough range. 18-200 or 270 seems to me like a better all around lens. I don't shoot alot of sports/action shots so speed isn't something high up on my list.

Thanks for any insight and or suggestions. Again, please bear with me..... I am a complete newbie.
[UPDATED] asked by Chris Martin on December 19, 2009
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Showing 1-10 of 16 answers
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Chris,

Actually the Canon EF-S 18-200 doesn't have any better image quality than the kit lens and the EF-S 55-250mm. This is because any 10X+ zoom range lenses have to have to many optical compromises to get that large of a zoom range. You'll notice Canon's professional L lenses only have a 3X to 4X zoom range. That coupled with the fact that the Canon kit lens has come a long way in the last 10 years is the reason. So, all you gain with the either of the two lenses you mentioned is not having to switch lenses, which is what having a dSLR is all about, being able to optimize the lens for the task at hand.

The one lens you do want to buy right away is the Canon 50mm f/1.8. It has amazing image quality and at $100 is a great deal.

If, you start out with the kit lens, EF-S 55-250mm and the 50mm f/1.8, will give you a solid start till you find what focal lengths you normally shoot at.

Some of the best value lenses out there are the:

Canon 28-135mm, this has great image quality, especially for a crop sensor camera as it doesn't start to soften on the edge till it's outside of the crop sensor image area. This is why it is the kit lens for even the Canon 7D.

Canon 50mm f/1.8, amazing optics, low price, cons are slow focus, and lower overall build quality.

Canon 85mm f/1.8, amazing optics, ring type USM, great build quality

Canon 70-200 f/4L, amazing optics, L lens quality, light and easy to carry, cons, slower than f/2.8 and no IS

Sigma 70-200 f/2.8, amazing optics, great build quality, great price, cons can front or back focus can require calibration to your camera.

Other lenses with good reputations:

Canon EF-S 17-55mm f/2.8 IS USM
Canon EF 28mm f/1.8 USM. - $400
Canon EF 70-300mm f/4-5.6 IS USM. - $550
Canon EF 17-40mm f/4L USM. - $700

The new Canon EF-S 15-85mm f/3.5-5.6 IS USM UD Wide Angle Zoom Lens for Canon Digital SLR Cameras looks to have fantastic image quality and a great range for a crop sensor camera.
Tom Martin answered on December 19, 2009

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The 50mm 1.8 lens is currently my lens of choice (it resides on my camera). I absolutely LOVE the sharpness and bokeh of that lens! For the money, I consider it the best lens Canon makes!
S. Pena answered on December 21, 2009

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Hi,

I think Tom's suggestions were all really good. I am using the kit lens plus the 55-250mm lens (since it was $200 off). I also recommend the EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 USM. One of the biggest problems I found with using a "crop camera" (one with a smaller than 35m sensor) is getting good wide angle shots. Maybe this isn't a concern of yours, it was for me. The EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 USM gets amazing wide angle shots, and the optics are better than the kit lens or the 55-250mm. The downside is the $720 price tag.
Jeremiah Edwards answered on December 20, 2009

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"Also, what are the main uses of the Canon 50mm f/1.8. Everything I read talks about it being a must have."

The 50mm f1.8 lens has a "wide aperture". This makes it useful for some low light shooting. It also allows you the option to blur out the background to a great extent so you can seperate your subject from the background. This makes it useful as a portrait lens.
Technology Guy answered on December 21, 2009

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Thank you both for your responses. I think I will take your suggestions and stick with the 55-250mm for now. Also, what are the main uses of the Canon 50mm f/1.8. Everything I read talks about it being a must have.
Chris Martin answered on December 20, 2009

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Well, the price for the 50mm f/1.8 is unbeatable. I've head that it takes great pictures, though it's construction is a little flimsy. I went ahead and bought the 50mm f/1.4 instead. It costs more than three times as much as the f/1.8, but this is serving as my primary indoor lens, and I think it is worth the extra bucks. It is faster than the f/1.8, has a better build, and has better glass. However, the USM motor has been known to have problems on the f/1.4. If you look up the 50mm f/1.4 on Amazon, you will see an excellent review comparing the two lenses. I'm a newbie too. Basically the f# is a measure of how fast the lens is and the depth of focus. The lower the number, the faster the lens (by a factor of the ratios squared, so an f/2 lens is actually four times as fast as an f/4 lens). This can be very important for shooting indoors and other low light conditions. It is also good if you want to get a narrow depth of focus (i.e. putting the subject in focus but have the background blur). Those who know more can chime in and correct my mistakes :)
Jeremiah Edwards answered on December 20, 2009

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I bet you've already bought the lens. For you or others, I bought the 50mm f1.8 because of the great reviews and low cost. I also bought a 28-135 that I thought was going to be my 'walk around' lens. The 50mmf1.8 has turned out to be my walk around lens. I love it. At the equiv of the old 35mm film 80 mm, it makes a good portrait lens.
Amazon Customer answered on January 21, 2010

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"Wide Angle Lens & 3X Lens for Canon rebel T1i[:] Can anyone please tell me how these lenses work and if they are of value."

These are not dSLR lenses like your kit lens but are actually add-on auxiliary lenses that screw onto the end of your kit lens. They are often advertised as being for certain dSLR makes and models as if they are actually dSLR lenses but were actually designed for point-and-shoot and video cameras which do not have interchangable lenses. Adding extra glass to the end of your lens will only make image quaility worse. You would be much better off purchasing real lenses for your T1i such as the Canon EF-S 55-250mm f/4.0-5.6 IS II Telephoto Zoom Lens for Canon Digital SLR Cameras As an alternative, you could crop your images in a photo editor like Photoshop Elements (a MUCH more useful way to spend $80 IMHO) instead of using a 3X auxillary lens and still get better image quality.
Technology Guy answered on May 26, 2010

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Caravaneer,

I have the same conclusion as yours. I decide to buy 'Canon EF-S 15-85mm f/3.5-5.6 IS USM UD Wide Angle Zoom Lens' over 'Canon EF 28-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS USM Standard Zoom Lens', plus 'Canon EF 50mm f/1.8 II Camera Lens'. But now I'm confused!!

So do you think the 'Canon EF 50mm f/1.8 II Camera Len' is the best walk-around lens? :\
S. Althubaiti answered on March 12, 2010

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Wide Angle Lens & 3X Lens for Canon rebel T1i

Can anyone please tell me how these lenses work and if they are of value. I am a beginning photographer ( for pleasure :) ) -- thank you.
Susanne Rudick answered on May 26, 2010
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