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You Can't Keep a Good Woman Down: Stories and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
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Comment: Publisher: HBJ
Date of Publication: 1982
Binding: mass market paperback
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You Can't Keep a Good Woman Down Mass Market Paperback – 1982

18 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback
  • Publisher: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich (1982)
  • ASIN: B003ZH9LGY
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (18 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #10,316,339 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Alice Walker (b. 1944), one of the United States' preeminent writers, is an award-winning author of novels, stories, essays, and poetry. In 1983, Walker became the first African-American woman to win a Pulitzer Prize for fiction with her novel The Color Purple, which also won the National Book Award. Her other books include The Third Life of Grange Copeland, Meridian, The Temple of My Familiar, and Possessing the Secret of Joy. In her public life, Walker has worked to address problems of injustice, inequality, and poverty as an activist, teacher, and public intellectual.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Peter Dykhuis VINE VOICE on March 31, 2008
Format: Paperback
In Alice Walkers You Can't Keep a Good Woman Down the emotions and ideas conveyed are far more important and poignant then the stories themselves. Each story is told to teach us about an idea or at least educate us on the emotion involved. The stories are a tool and not primarily an entertainment construct.
From the first story Nineteen Fifty-Five to the last story A Sudden Trip Home in spring we are given a number of concepts and emotions to experience. These emotions run from despair to triumph and the ideas we are taught deal with porn, inequality, gender relationships and far more. At initial glance there does not seem to be a common theme until you look at the obvious. The obvious of course is the female perspective and perhaps as important the African American Woman perspective.
Each story told is from the perspective of African American woman. We are told a story of trauma and trial through the eyes of each of these women. The trials are not always unique. We all deal with trials and we are all human. This is nothing new. What is new, especially for readers other then African American woman, is the viewpoint. The viewpoint of common and uncommon situations from a unique and often unobserved vantage point is striking and piercing.
The woman who wrote the novel wrote it in a raw and biting manner. A man reading this or more concisely a white man reading this is given the opportunity to experience emotions and trials that otherwise would never be possible. Does this mean a white man would understand some of the issues dealt with by the author after reading this book? I do not believe this is the case or even the point of the book. Understanding is not asked for merely awareness. You can ignore what is unknown but once awareness is involved a step has been taken.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By biscotti on January 14, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I have had to write some fiction for college classes and was reading a lot of short stories to get an idea of what is out there. Alice Walker is among the best writers ever, able to experiment and work with different styles. I could not put this book down.
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Format: Paperback
In Alice Walkers You Can't Keep a Good Woman Down the emotions and ideas conveyed are far more important and poignant then the stories themselves. Each story is told to teach us about an idea or at least educate us on the emotion involved. The stories are a tool and not primarily an entertainment construct.
From the first story Nineteen Fifty-Five to the last story A Sudden Trip Home in spring we are given a number of concepts and emotions to experience. These emotions run from despair to triumph and the ideas we are taught deal with porn, inequality, gender relationships and far more. At initial glance there does not seem to be a common theme until you look at the obvious. The obvious of course is the female perspective and perhaps as important the African American Woman perspective.
Each story told is from the perspective of African American woman. We are told a story of trauma and trial through the eyes of each of these women. The trials are not always unique. We all deal with trials and we are all human. This is nothing new. What is new, especially for readers other then African American woman, is the viewpoint. The viewpoint of common and uncommon situations from a unique and often unobserved vantage point is striking and piercing.
The woman who wrote the novel wrote it in a raw and biting manner. A man reading this or more concisely a white man reading this is given the opportunity to experience emotions and trials that otherwise would never be possible. Does this mean a white man would understand some of the issues dealt with by the author after reading this book? I do not believe this is the case or even the point of the book. Understanding is not asked for merely awareness. You can ignore what is unknown but once awareness is involved a step has been taken.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback
In Alice Walkers You Can't Keep a Good Woman Down the emotions and ideas conveyed are far more important and poignant then the stories themselves. Each story is told to teach us about an idea or at least educate us on the emotion involved. The stories are a tool and not primarily an entertainment construct.
From the first story Nineteen Fifty-Five to the last story A Sudden Trip Home in spring we are given a number of concepts and emotions to experience. These emotions run from despair to triumph and the ideas we are taught deal with porn, inequality, gender relationships and far more. At initial glance there does not seem to be a common theme until you look at the obvious. The obvious of course is the female perspective and perhaps as important the African American Woman perspective.
Each story told is from the perspective of African American woman. We are told a story of trauma and trial through the eyes of each of these women. The trials are not always unique. We all deal with trials and we are all human. This is nothing new. What is new, especially for readers other then African American woman, is the viewpoint. The viewpoint of common and uncommon situations from a unique and often unobserved vantage point is striking and piercing.
The woman who wrote the novel wrote it in a raw and biting manner. A man reading this or more concisely a white man reading this is given the opportunity to experience emotions and trials that otherwise would never be possible. Does this mean a white man would understand some of the issues dealt with by the author after reading this book? I do not believe this is the case or even the point of the book. Understanding is not asked for merely awareness. You can ignore what is unknown but once awareness is involved a step has been taken.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
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