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Can't You Make Them Behave, King George? Paperback – September 9, 1996


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 7 - 9 years
  • Grade Level: 2 - 4
  • Paperback: 48 pages
  • Publisher: Puffin; Reissue edition (September 9, 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0698114027
  • ISBN-13: 978-0698114029
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 7.1 x 0.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #37,823 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

"The question I am most often asked," Jean Fritz says, "is how do I find my ideas? The answer is: I don't. Ideas find me. A character in history will suddenly step right out of the past and demand a book. Generally people don't bother to speak to me unless there's a good chance that I'll take them on." Throughout almost four decades of writing about history, Jean Fritz has taken on plenty of people, starting with George Washington in The Cabin Faced West (1958). Since then, her refreshingly informal historical biographies for children have been widely acclaimed as "unconventional," "good-humored," "witty," "irrepressible," and "extraordinary."

In her role as biographer, Jean Fritz attempts to uncover the adventures and personalities behind each character she researches. "Once my character and I have reached an understanding," she explains, "then I begin the detective work--reading old books, old letters, old newspapers, and visiting the places where my subject lived. Often I turn up surprises and of course I pass these on." It is her penchant for making distant historical figures seem real that brings the characters to life and makes the biographies entertaining, informative, and filled with natural child appeal.

An original and lively thinker, as well as an inspiration to children and adults, Jean Fritz is undeniably a master of her craft. She was awarded the Regina Medal by the Catholic Library Association, presented with the Laura Ingalls Wilder Award by the American Library Association for her "substantial and lasting contribution to children's literature," and honored with the Knickerbocker Award for Juvenile Literature, which was presented by the New York State Library Association for her body of work.

copyright ? 2000 by Penguin Putnam Books for Young Readers. All rights reserved.


More About the Author

"The question I am most often asked," Jean Fritz says, "is how do I find my ideas? The answer is: I don't. Ideas find me. A character in history will suddenly step right out of the past and demand a book. Generally people don't bother to speak to me unless there's a good chance that I'll take them on." Throughout almost four decades of writing about history, Jean Fritz has taken on plenty of people, starting with George Washington in The Cabin Faced West (1958). Since then, her refreshingly informal historical biographies for children have been widely acclaimed as "unconventional," "good-humored," "witty," "irrepressible," and "extraordinary."In her role as biographer, Jean Fritz attempts to uncover the adventures and personalities behind each character she researches. "Once my character and I have reached an understanding," she explains, "then I begin the detective work--reading old books, old letters, old newspapers, and visiting the places where my subject lived. Often I turn up surprises and of course I pass these on." It is her penchant for making distant historical figures seem real that brings the characters to life and makes the biographies entertaining, informative, and filled with natural child appeal.An original and lively thinker, as well as an inspiration to children and adults, Jean Fritz is undeniably a master of her craft. She was awarded the Regina Medal by the Catholic Library Association, presented with the Laura Ingalls Wilder Award by the American Library Association for her "substantial and lasting contribution to children's literature," and honored with the Knickerbocker Award for Juvenile Literature, which was presented by the New York State Library Association for her body of work.

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
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See all 13 customer reviews
This book is a pleasure to read.
J. Arena
Well I still think he wasn't a BAD guy, he just tried to take the easiest way out.
R, your friendly neighborhood reviewer
The writing style is nice and folksy, and the illustrations are charmingly naive.
J. Weinberg

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

23 of 25 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 1, 1999
Format: Paperback
Jean Fritz has created many fabulous books for children. "Can't You Make Them Behave, King George?" is one of my favorites. It shows the beginning of the American Revolution from the eyes of King George. The book is humerous and historically correct. Kids and adults will enjoy reading it together!
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By R, your friendly neighborhood reviewer on October 23, 2004
Format: Paperback
King George is considered to be one of the greatest opponents of the American Revolution. But does anyone ever really hear of his good traits until now. And in a childrens book! Well I know I didn't. And after reading this short story I found that ole George wasn't such a bad guy after all. All he wanted was for Brittain to become, well...richer. Couldn't those colonists help pay for some of his debts. Well maybe, if those colonists actually had any SAY in British matters then they should have to pay taxes. Well I still think he wasn't a BAD guy, he just tried to take the easiest way out.

Tomie DePaola and Jean Fritz-I think-make the perfect team. His comical illustrations with her undefinable text make this book a classic.

Fritz or Freedman '04. You decide.
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16 of 19 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 15, 2000
Format: Paperback
I learned all kinds of things about King George, Queen Charlotte and others. It really helped me with my research on the Revolutionary war. In this book you get to learn the funny things about King George and things that happened during his time.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on June 6, 2009
Format: Paperback
A charming little book, but nonetheless markedly biased. George III is treated gently, politely and even kindly in Jean Fritz's illustrated fable; the King's sense of honor and duty is palpable, and his character is given a review which is unusual but refreshing. Additionally, the illustrations are superb (they are what drew me in to begin with). The biggest problem I found was that the fact that George's motivations for entering into the war with America were misrepresented. Of course, this is not the place to enter into such a narrative, but any serious biography of him will lay out a set of ideas very different from those found in Fritz's prose. It is slightly worrying that a young child might be fed an incomplete truth; had the author given some of the King's stronger reasons, this would be an excellent gift for any young Historian. I recommend that it be enjoyed with a pinch of salt.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By J. Arena TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on October 21, 2007
Format: Hardcover
Blushing and turning in my toes (just like George, Himself), I, like millions of others stand corrected about that arch-villain of our history, George III! As it turns out, he's a real person, just like the rest of us.

Can't You Make Them Behave, King George? brings his story to life for young readers. There's a lot for parents and teachers to enjoy here, too. Huzzah for Jean Fritz, who knows how to tell "his-story" with a great sense of humor making it as enjoyable as it should be.

This book is a pleasure to read.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By J. Weinberg on February 16, 2006
Format: Paperback
I bought this book to read with my children (ages 8 and 10). I found the book interesting, and learned a bit about King George's youth. My children thought it wasokay, even though their father was forcing it on them. I even caught my wife sneaking a read.

The writing style is nice and folksy, and the illustrations are charmingly naive. The personal spin it places on the American Revolution, coupled with the emphasis on the British perspective, is a refreshing contrast to some of the more serious books I've read on revolutionary history.

All in all, a nice read.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Tracy L. Polyak on June 7, 2009
Format: Paperback
My 4yo and I loved reading this book together. She is at an age where she wants to know if people were good or bad. This book presented both sides and showed how someone can want to be good, try to be good, and not everybody will agree with him, and he may still make mistakes. She also asked about whether taxes were bad, since that is part of the reason given for the Revolution. The book gave me a chance to talk to her about all of the things that taxes pay for, such as roads, firefighters, police officers, etc.
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