Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more

Captain America: Deathlok Lives Paperback


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from Collectible from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$18.97 $11.94 $17.99
Comic
"Please retry"
$64.87

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

100 M&T
100 Mysteries & Thrillers to Read in a Lifetime
Looking for something good to read? Browse our picks for 100 Mysteries & Thrillers to Read in a Lifetime, brought to you by the Amazon Book Editors.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 64 pages
  • Publisher: Marvel Comics (1993)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0785100199
  • ISBN-13: 978-0785100195
  • Product Dimensions: 10.5 x 7 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #887,874 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Born and raised in Brooklyn, New York, Eisner Award winner J. M. DeMatteis was a professional musician and rock music journalist before entering the comic book field. Although he's written almost all of the major DC and Marvel icons -- including critically-lauded runs on Justice League International and Spider-Man (the epic "Kraven's Last Hunt" was voted the number one story in Spider-Man's fifty year history by Comic Book Resources), DeMatteis's greatest acclaim has come for sophisticated original graphic novels like Seekers Into The Mystery, Blood: A Tale, The Last One, and Mercy. The autobiographical Brooklyn Dreams was picked by the ALA as one of the Ten Best Graphic Novels and Booklist, in a starred review, called it "as graphically distinguished and creatively novelistic a graphic novel as has ever been...a classic of the form." The groundbreaking Moonshadow was chosen (along with Brooklyn Dreams, Blood and other DeMatteis works) for inclusion in Gene Kanenberg, Jr's 2008 book 500 Essential Graphic Novels -- where it was hailed as one of the finest fantasy graphic novels ever created.

His success in the comic book medium has led DeMatteis to work in both television (writing live action and animation) and movies (creating screenplays for Fox, Disney Feature Animation, directors Carlo Carlei and Chris Columbus and producer Dean Devlin, among others).

More recently DeMatteis has had great success with the children's fantasy series Abadazad (hailed by Entertainment Weekly as "...one of those very rare fantasy works that can enchant preteen kids and 40-year old fanboys..."), The Life and Times of Savior 28 (called "one of the finest super hero stories of the decade" by Newsarama) and the novel Imaginalis (which Publishers Weekly praised as "a sure-footed fantasy" with a "hopeful message about the power of reading and belief.")

Current projects include the upcoming all-ages fantasies The Adventures of Augusta Wind and The Edward Gloom Mysteries; writing for Cartoon Network's Teen Titans Go (set to debut in 2013); his ongoing Imagination 101 workshops, which explore the practicalities and metaphysics of writing for comics, graphic novels and animation; and Creation Point, a story consultation service that offers in-depth guidance for both the professional and aspiring writer.

DeMatteis and his family live in upstate New York. His blogs can be found here at Amazon.com and at www.jmdematteis.com.

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
1
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See the customer review
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By "brannonc" on July 16, 2001
Format: Paperback
Captain America is a hard character to write; it's too easy to turn him into a caricature, a right-wing, nationalistic, naively patriotic, semi-fascist buffoon. In the "Deathlok Lives" story, JM DeMatteis (with an assist from the amazing art of Mike Zeck, one of the great Cap artists of all time) really manages to get at the heart of what makes Cap tick. DeMatties concentrates on how a man from the 40s struggles to live in contemporary society, on how relevant a hero created to be a symbol of 1940s America can be in a grimmer, more cynical age.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Search
ARRAY(0xa4d03bb8)

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?