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Captive in Iran: A Remarkable True Story of Hope and Triumph amid the Horror of Tehran's Brutal Evin Prison Hardcover


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Captive in Iran: A Remarkable True Story of Hope and Triumph amid the Horror of Tehran's Brutal Evin Prison + The Insanity of God: A True Story of Faith Resurrected
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 312 pages
  • Publisher: Tyndale Momentum (April 2, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1414371209
  • ISBN-13: 978-1414371207
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.3 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (296 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #222,604 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Inside Flap

For all we knew, this could be our last day on earth.
“I hope you’ve been thinking carefully,” the interrogator said, nibbling on a piece of bread. “Have you?”

I wondered if he knew how hungry we were, or if he always ate in front of prisoners.

“What should we have been thinking of?” Maryam asked.

“About telling us what we want to know about you and your activities. I have checked your laptop and read all the evidence against you,” he said sternly. “You must tell us everything about people you have contact with, which organizations you work with. Otherwise, we will lock your hands and feet together and beat you until you die.

“Think about that as you prepare for your interrogation.” Pushing back abruptly from the table, he walked out.

Despite our earlier bravado, we were afraid. For all we knew, this could be our last day on earth. We held hands and prayed for strength.

If we are tortured, give us the power to stand fast.

From the Back Cover

Locked away, but not silenced . . .
Maryam Rostampour and Marziyeh Amirizadeh knew they were putting their lives on the line. Though Islamic laws in Iran forbade them from sharing their Christian beliefs, in three years they’d covertly put New Testaments into the hands of twenty thousand of their countrymen. They’d started two secret house churches, including one for prostitutes—many of them women who had been abandoned by their husbands and had no other way to support themselves and their children. Maryam and Marziyeh had almost been caught many times . . . it seemed like divine intervention when they were not.

But finally—perhaps inevitably—in 2009, the two young women were arrested and held in the notorious Evin Prison in Tehran, a place where inmates are routinely tortured, and executions are swift and sudden. But in the face of chilling interrogations and intimidation, and risking a death sentence, something remarkable happened: Instead of succumbing to fear, they chose to take the radical—and dangerous—step of sharing their faith inside the very walls of the government stronghold that was meant to silence them.

In Captive in Iran, Maryam and Marziyeh recount how God used their 259 days in Evin Prison to bring about a miraculous reversal: shining light into one of the world’s darkest places, giving hope to those who had lost everything, and showing love to those in despair.

Customer Reviews

This amazing book is about courage love and faith in the Lord Jesus Christ..
Fran
An amazing story of how God can turn anything meant for evil or harm into good for those that love Jesus and are called according to his purposes!
Lynnette Murray
This is a very enlightening book regarding Islam in Iran and the injustices of the Iranian government.
Kay E. Swartzendruber

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

35 of 36 people found the following review helpful By D. Kline on April 2, 2013
Format: Hardcover
How strong is your faith? Could you withstand torture, living in filth, the threat of execution and still proclaim Christ your Savior? In Tehran, just a few years ago, the authors were arrested for proclaiming themselves Christians and for distributing New Testaments written in Farsi to people in Iran. Supposedly, it was not a crime to be Christian, but it was a serious crime to evangelize...the crime of apostasy. Charged, the two women were imprisoned in the notorious Evin Prison in Tehran for over nine months. While many would shiver in fear and deny their religion, Maryam and Marziyeh saw their experience as a chance to witness to Christ among the murderers, thieves, prostitutes, angry guards and others who were there. Many women were charged and imprisoned unjustly. We learned of their stories and of the laws which denied women any basic freedoms in Iran. The authors became friends to many of the prisoners because Maryam and Marziyeh were humble and generous and prayed with anyone who requested it.
The authors endured numerous intense interrogations and poor health because of the lack of adequate medical care and the filthy living conditions, yet they remained firm in their stance for the right to share the story of a forgiving, loving and merciful God. Many conversions were made as they prayed with those who seemed to have little hope.
Eventually, they learned of the outside world's notice of their imprisonment and the pressure being placed on the Iranian government to release them. It was a delicate matter as the Iranians wanted to save face, but eventually the acquittal was obtained and Maryam and Marziyeh were set free. They never gave in to the pressure to deny Christ to save their own lives, even under the threat of execution.
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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Bill Grandi on April 2, 2013
Format: Hardcover
The Apostle Paul

Polycarp

John Hus

Watchman Nee

Dietrich Bonhoeffer

Saeed Abedini

Those names, and more, are pretty familiar to those who follow the church, especially the persecuted church. I have something more pressing I ask every time I read of a past martyr or a present martyr for the cause of Christ.

One Question haunts me: Could I take the stand these and thousands of others have? If I was arrested for my faith, put under intense scrutiny, suffering extreme persecution, could I would I be able to remain strong?

My answer? I hope so. But really, how would I know? I won't until or unless I come under that type of fire!

Enter Captive in Iran, a book by two Iranian ladies who became followers of Jesus and were arrested for their faith. Maryam Rostampour and Marziyeh Amirizadeh converted to Christ from Islam; met at a theology school in Turkey in 2005; then decided to work together by returning to Iran in order to share Jesus. All was going well until one day they were arrested for promoting Christianity. The charges were for apostasy, anti-government activity, and blasphemy, for which they faced execution by hanging. They languished in a detention camp enduring endless questioning and impossible conditions, until being transferred to the dreaded Evin Prison (ironically a prison they could see from their apartment window). They then endured 259 days in Evin while awaiting their "day in court." They were pawns in a very broken and biased court system. Their case garnered international attention thanks to the internet and other media. Appeals were being made by all corners of the world (except the Muslim world) for their freedom. Finally, their freedom became a reality.
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17 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Daniel Bartsch on April 8, 2013
Format: Hardcover
In 2009, two young single Christian Iranian women were caught evangelizing Muslims and imprisoned in Tehran's notorious Evin prison. Their "crime" could easily have gotten them executed, but instead, God gave them an incredible ministry to Muslim women inside the jail, and such international publicity that the Iranian government eventually released them to save face.

Captive in Iran is their story.

Maryam and Marziyeh's boldness touched me when I first read of them in VOM's 2009 newsletters. My mother had special seasons of prayer for them. I shared about them in my 2009 IDOP message, and then was delighted to tell my church a few weeks later of their release. So it was a great joy to finally read the all the details of their 259 days of incarceration.

It turned out to be a different book than I expected.

At first I thought it might be like Dan Baumann's Imprisoned in Iran. He, too, spent time in Evin for evangelism. But he experienced far worse physical and emotional abuse than these women did (they had regular access to a telephone and were not beaten or kept in solitary confinement like he was) and consequently his emotions dipped much lower than theirs, to the point where he attempted suicide. Maryam and Marziyeh, on the other hand, remained relatively strong even in their darkest hours.

It isn't like Corrie Ten Boom's The Hiding Place either. No warm, lengthy story of their upbringing; no truly three dimensional characters whom you feel like you know afterwards; no struggle to forgive; no contrast of personalities (Corrie and Betsie were clearly different; Maryam and Marziyeh seem like spiritual twins). I doubt you'll see a movie made of this book.
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