Caravan [Keepnews Collection]

June 5, 2007 | Format: MP3

$7.99
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
9:46
30
2
5:31
30
3
4:05
30
4
8:21
30
5
4:51
30
6
6:49
30
7
7:26
30
8
5:26


Product Details

  • Original Release Date: June 5, 2007
  • Release Date: June 5, 2007
  • Label: Riverside
  • Copyright: (C) 2007 Concord Music Group, Inc.
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 52:15
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B000UBQN6O
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #70,928 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

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23 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Samuel Chell HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on September 10, 2007
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
No need to steer clear of this date by Blakey's highly regarded Shorter-anchored sextet simply because it's a Riverside session. The approach to recording the group differs significantly from Van Gelder's, resulting in a new perspective on the group's ensemble and solo sound. Blakey's press rolls, ride cymbal, and hi hat aren't nearly as loud, occasionally blending into the mix to allow the soloists to be heard without boosts or enhancement. The piano's sonorities are natural, reflecting the overtones of the cabinetry and acoustic space that are part of the instrument's true sound. Blakey's "vocalizing" during his solos has never been more fully captured and is a revelation, allowing us to feel the living presence of the man himself as he distributes cymbal sounds that come equally from all speakers. Rather than bring the sound to the listener, the approach is the opposite--more transparent, passive and natural--a documentation rather than a construction of the sound. It's not necessarily better, but it's a fascinating, even edifying, change of perspective.

As for the musicianship and program, rate both a high five. By now Hubbard is beginning to make listeners forget about Lee Morgan and even starting to take the spotlight away from Shorter. On both his and Shorter's originals, the band plays sforzando phrases that positively swell from ppp to ffff, unlike the limited dynamic range on most of the group's recordings. Hubbard's ballad feature, "Skylark," is nearly equaled by Curtis Fuller's solo feature on "Wee Small Hours." The two out-takes are played well, but most listeners will find their money well spent without them. All in all, another essential recording by the early '60s Messengers.
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Thomas P. Hughes on July 4, 2009
Format: Audio CD
This album currently holds the "House Is On Fire And I Can Only Save One CD" award for me. Though not the first Jazz Messengers CD that I bought (that being "Free For All," another great album), it has definitely kept me coming back. The compositions are captivating, particularly as they are orchestrated on these tracks; I go all day with Thermo or Sweet 'n' Sour stuck in my head until I have to listen to the album again. But beyond this, the way the soloists flesh out the themes sends shivers down my spine. Shorter, Hubbard, and Walton are all fantastic, but I have to wonder how Curtis Fuller can riff as fast as he does on an instrument so seemingly cumbersome, at least to an outside observer, as the trombone. And then we come to Art Blakey. I must admit that in the past I have felt that there was something indulgent about drum solos. I would politely put up with them until the real music resumed. Blakey has put an end to that for me. His expansive polyrhythmic solos (yes, more than one) on the title track viscerally captivate me. And even when he's not soloing, he is clearly the accelerant for everything else happening on the album. My only criticism is that Reggie Workman never really gets the spotlight. He adds more than a mere walking-bass line, but you kind of think that a percussionist band leader would have showcased all members of the rhythm section. All in all, though, this album is positively incendiary; keep a potholder handy to rescue it from your house fire, but be careful: it might be the thing that started the blaze in the first place!
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Format: MP3 Music Verified Purchase
This has Wayne Shorter, Freddie Hubbard, Cedar Walton and of course Blakey. Features great arrangements as well as originals like "This is for Albert" by Shorter. I won't tire of hearing this album.
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Format: MP3 Music
As the first of four hit albums that Art Blakey And The Jazz Messengers made for
the Riverside label between late 1962 and 1964, this session finds his assertive and
stimulating band at a new affiliation by performing at their top level form and with the
same hard-driving `play it loud' excellence that made them a universal phenomenon.
Recorded in October of 1962 and released at the start of 1963, Caravan delivers up
another skillfully vibrant and versatile musical sound which swings with high voltage
vitality, well-structured melody, first class band camaraderie and memorable music,
with whom Blakey and his Jazz Messengers handle quite well. Beginning with their
raucous take on Duke Ellington's Caravan (the title track), the exhilarating track set
proceeds on with the Wayne Shorter-penned jazz waltz Sweet `N' Sour, the classic
Frank Sinatra ballad In The Wee Small Hours Of The Morning, the Wayne Shorter-
written This Is For Albert, Skylark and the preppy Freddie Hubbard-written Thermo.
As usual, you even get a couple stellar bonus track takes on Thermo and Sweet `N'
Sour, Caravan ranks as one of his finest masterworks and Miles Davis even stated
around the time, particularly on Caravan, at this point: "Art's got so much talent".
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