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Cargon: Honour & Privilege Paperback – June 6, 2011


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 204 pages
  • Publisher: Martin Sisters Publishing (June 6, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1937273008
  • ISBN-13: 978-1937273002
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.5 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #6,281,332 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Kimberly Gould has created a new world without abandoning the one we already know. With tender love and heart-stopping maneuvers, Cargon races toward a surprise ending that will leave you craving more. -- Jennifer M. Barry, author of "The Kingdom"

From the Author

Cargon: Honour and Privilege is the first of three Cargon books I have planned. As a post-apocalyptic renaissance, Cargon combines the feel of medieval fantasy with the science and speculative components of Science Fiction. It is a true Sci-Fi/Fantasy. Although the protagonist is female, this isn't a 'girl' book. Logic rules Eve more than emotion and the point of view in the story is shared with a male character, Adam.

More About the Author

Kimberly Gould hates being called Kimmy, but her mother called her Kimmydonn and that was okay. She lives in Edmonton with her husband and daughter. When she isn't writing about the post-apocalyptic world, she is doing her best to prevent an apocalypse as an environmental consultant. She is the author of the Cargon series as well as Thickness of Blood and Never Say Die: A Zombie Time Loop Story. You can find her anywhere online as Kimmydonn, including her website, Kimmydonn.com.

Customer Reviews

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See all 7 customer reviews
A great story, interesting characters and a very well developed world make this a genuinely fun read.
slap_shot_12
You can tell the relationship was really important to the author since it shows in the way she wrote every affectionate scene.
Stephanie Leroux
If you're looking for a sweet, light read about the power of love and confidence in yourself, Cargon is a perfect choice.
Kindle Customer

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Kindle Customer on June 18, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Eve lives as a servant in a world where no one questions their class or status. She fulfills her duties with pride, knows her place, and delights in a job well done. She is ecstatic when she receives a promotion to wine server in the dining room of the Most High, a position that reflects both her beauty and proficiency. While working there, she watches the noblemen and noblewomen playing a complicated game of strategy and risk. Their wagers are higher than anyone of the servant class would have imagined, and the idea of trading estates, titles, and even spouses intrigues Eve as much as it horrifies her. The Most High observes her curiosity in the game, something that servants do not normally even take notice of. Eve is sent to school along with the children of the nobility, a rarity for a servant girl.

This is where we really get to know and love Eve. She summarily kicks butt in pretty much every area of her classes, including science, logic, and ethics. She becomes a favorite of the teacher, engages in complicated discussions of reason with him,and is so engrossed by her studies that she spends her free time in the library, reading anything she can get her hands on and sketching out new scientific theories and the like.

This book was a great read for the "girl power" part of me. The hero, Adam, falls in love with Eve because she is so smart and enthusiastic about learning new things. Of course he is attracted to her looks, but he really gets excited when she makes some brilliant observation about how to conduct electricity or something. That's my kind of man.

I did find myself wishing, at times, for a greater connection to Eve's desires, feelings, and motivations.
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Format: Kindle Edition
Cargon is the story about a board game like no other. Nothing is off limits when the game is played. Whatever is at stake, the loser must give up what is asked of them, no exceptions. It is all for honour. When a young server named Eve is promoted to wines, she witnesses the game of Cargon while serving the Elite. She gets noticed and due to her perception and wits, doors open for her. She soon rises beyond her the life of a server and is now struggling between her old life and her new life. Eve must figure out where she stands and who she will stand with.

This is quite a unique read. It is an unusual and beautiful mixture of Historical Fiction and Dystopian. The world we know now is gone and has backtracked to the times of no electricity, no skyscrapers and split classes; the Elite and the servants. I love the world Gould has given us. It is so interesting. The world-building alone is enough to check out this book. Gould did a wonderful job laying out the world for us. It is very elaborate. The one year that is mentioned in this book is 264. I am not even sure how far in the future this really is or what happened, but it is like the world has restarted or something. I like that a lot.

It only took a few pages before I was completely engulfed in this story. We follow Eve, who starts off as a quiet servant and see her become such a strong and smart woman. The more she learns from her growing positions, the more we see how brilliant. I love how willing she is to take advantage of the opportunities in front of her. I love witnessing how much she has grown. I especially love how she actually gets such a high position.
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Format: Kindle Edition
Personally, I think there's something quite special about this book. I really enjoyed it, and since I devoured it in less than one day, I think that's pretty meaningful. At first, I was hesitant to read it because it only had 15 ratings on Goodreads, but I'm glad I gave it a chance.

The writing of the book seemed a little rough at times and the editing also seemed to lack. I was able to overlook this since the story was so engaging. It tells the story of a young servant girl named Eve, who lives in a dystopian world that has reverted back to historical times. No electricity and the separation of the aristocracy from the servants gives us the impression of going back to the middle-ages. Society is divided into two major groups: the elite, who are wealthy and control society, and the servants, who are raised to follow the elites' every order. A very strict line separates the two groups and it would be unthinkable for a servant to join the ranks of the elite, let alone gain an important status among them. However, Eve has unknowingly challenged someone in playing Cargon, a game that reminds me somewhat of chess and a game which can change society so drastically with just a few wrong moves (or good ones). As Eve gains a place among the elite, her world changes dramatically as she finds a way to adjust to her new position.

Throughout the book, we see Eve grow from an immature and naïve servant girl into an intelligent and strong-willed woman. Her fresh outlook on life has given her a real advantage in her new station but I think it's her dedication to her studies that has helped her take on a leadership role. Any young girl would want to be Eve in this type of society and I think any girl would be envious of the relationship she has with Adam, one of the elites.
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