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28 of 29 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Most Inspiring Story
I took on reading this book with a heavy heart as I've known the family well for more than 30 years and thought reading it would be too painful. But in fact the book inspired me in so many ways, perhaps in no more important way than in terms of my own parenting. Every parent can relate to how challenging it is to help one's children find their own voice in life. How do...
Published on March 28, 2012 by Brian W. Saber

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263 of 288 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Mixed feelings as a reader and ASD parent
As a reader, I think this book is enlightening and inspiring. I am grateful for Carly opening her life and her struggle for the general public to learn and to witness. As the parent of a child with autism, I found the financial and resource discrepancy between Carly's family and many families in this situation start to grind. The list of advantages quickly left me feeling...
Published on May 27, 2012 by BeckyFS


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263 of 288 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Mixed feelings as a reader and ASD parent, May 27, 2012
By 
BeckyFS (Portland, OR United States) - See all my reviews
As a reader, I think this book is enlightening and inspiring. I am grateful for Carly opening her life and her struggle for the general public to learn and to witness. As the parent of a child with autism, I found the financial and resource discrepancy between Carly's family and many families in this situation start to grind. The list of advantages quickly left me feeling detached from this family: full-time nanny, upper middle-class home/neighborhood, full-time (and weekend) therapists, summer camps for all the children, attorneys, vacations, and people giving up time and resources in every crisis.) Instead of feeling hopeful, I quit reading at page 223 when a neighbor offers to renovate her house to accommodate Carly living there four days a week. I know it may sound harsh, even envious--it is. But I wanted to hear about a regular family's triumph over autism--I hoped to hear about how we, too, may overcome autism. But without even a fraction of these resources, I am left feeling helpless. My husband and I haven't gone on a date in two years. Friends and family shake their heads and "tsk, tsk" over our situation, but no one offers us three hours A MONTH, let alone home renovations. I'm just not sure who the audience is for this book. Mostly because I don't personally know of any family with these resources. I would just caution other autism parents wanting to read a story about family struggle to be aware of this element to the book. Could Carly have improved enough to communicate if she didn't have 24/7 professional staff for the first 10 years of her life? Could her parents have stayed married if they didn't have four days a week without her home? My intent is not to trash the family. It's great that they were able to give their daughter and family so much. My intent is to say that had I known this part of the story, I doubt I would have purchased this book. It left me feeling depressed about what I can offer my child and hopeless for such a recovery for him.
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28 of 29 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Most Inspiring Story, March 28, 2012
I took on reading this book with a heavy heart as I've known the family well for more than 30 years and thought reading it would be too painful. But in fact the book inspired me in so many ways, perhaps in no more important way than in terms of my own parenting. Every parent can relate to how challenging it is to help one's children find their own voice in life. How do we encourage them, reward them, guide them, and discipline them in ways that encourage their growth and uncover their true voice? How do we give them the tools that give them the confidence to be all that they can be. And how do we forgive ourselves for all the times we fall short.

This is a miraculous story and I can't wait to see what Carly has in store for us as she continues to use her voice to dispel the ignorance we all have about Autism.
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21 of 23 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Carly saves the world of autism, March 29, 2012
By 
Jonas T Bradshaw (Saipan, MP United States) - See all my reviews
Reading this book has allowed me to understand my own daughter, who is very much like Carly. I even went so far as to purchase a second copy for the ABA classroom that she is in. This book has helped open my eyes to some of the behaviors and activities that have been going on with my daughter. Carly and her family's struggles have helped pave the way for children like my daughter, and this book shows not only what they went through, but why Carly and other autistic children behave and act the way they do. While reading this book, I have highlighted several parts that coincide with my daughter. This is my new bible for my daughter and I can now look at her the way I have always wanted. I have always thought my daughter was extremely intelligent and was working through problems and solving puzzles, but this book has shown me to what extent she is performing at. Thank you both Arthur and Carly for sharing what you have endured, and allowing some of us to be able to take what you have learned to be able to apply it to our own lives.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars must read for every parent!, April 13, 2012
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This book was an inspiration to read. I have to say that my son who is 10, was non-verbal until age 6. He still has speech delays and cannot fully communicate, thus the reason I ordered the book. There were times I cried, like when Carly said "fix my brain". I remember my son saying those words, but only because another boy had told him there was something wrong with his brain. This book has really helped me to continue helping and understanding my son and always allow him to be what he wants to be. Thank you Carly for letting the world know that although you could not speak, you have many amazing thoughts...and parents MUST listen to the inner voice of their child.
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A must read for anyone who works with kids & adults with ASD, April 6, 2012
By 
Bev Pike (NW Wisconsin) - See all my reviews
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I first heard of Carly on YouTube. Her videos from 2020 and other interviews actually were what gave me the courage to bring my 47-year-old daughter home after 40 years!

I finished this book in a very short time - the first chapters on living with an autistic child reminded me of what life was like until my daughter reached age 7; the awful frustration, depression, and hopelessness of trying to find "a pill that would fix her" and finally having the "experts" tell you that this wonderful, beautiful little girl will never develop mentally past the age of 3. We were unable to care for her and keep her safe so we institutionalized her when she was 7.

Carly is able to tell the story from what the autistic child hears, sees, and learns - - its an amazing revelation that hasn't been believed until now! It will give you a whole new way of working with autistic children & adults. I think this is one of the most important books to be written this year!
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Absolutely brilliant book!!!!, March 27, 2012
By 
Carly's Voice is a must read, she is an amazing young woman who provides so much insight into the world of non verbal autists. Thank you to the Fleischmann family for sharing so much of yourselves in this book. I just can't put it down.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Voice, September 29, 2013
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I bought the book thinking I would be reading about the thoughts of a autistic girl named Carly. I found out that it was in her Dad's voice and what he and the family went through with a small portion of the book about Carly's thoughts.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A great story about struggle and triumph., April 8, 2012
A read of "Carly's Voice, breaking through Autism" by Arthur Fleischmann (with his daughter Carly) is an amazing and wildly insightful look into a world unknown by most. The Fleischmann Family are modern day heroes whose fortitude, compassion, love of one another and tenacity could (and maybe should) be a recipe for all of us to study and employ. Arthur is brutally (and shockingly) honest about his feelings regarding the challenges of having an autistic child. He takes great care in explaining and so eloquently articulates the struggles and difficulties he and his wife Tammy faced; the reader should expect to find themselves filled with a deep sense of emotion. However, just when you are at the point of shaking your head in dis-belief or shared despair, those feelings become quickly hijacked, if not completely over-shadowed, by Arthur's incredible wit, satire and sense of humor. Arthur's terrific use of humor (and its palpable presence in this remarkable family - which in itself can also be a lesson to us all) pulls you through this incredible story. Carly is brilliant in her writing (and wit) - ever reminding us of that cliche': what you see is NOT always what you get.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars If there were more stars I'd mark them to, April 5, 2012
The most inspiring book I've ever read. For her and her family to be so open and true about everything is just amazing. Her story is so inspiring with or without autism. A must read for sure. She has helped me understand Autism so much more.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This book will offer hope to many parents of children "on the spectrum" and give them new avenues for exploration, March 30, 2012
By 
Bookreporter (New York, New York) - See all my reviews
"I want people to understand that autistic people are people and we all have an inner voice." This book is told in Carly Fleischmann's voice, projected by her father, Arthur. For 11 years, Carly was the sort of terribly chaotic problem child who so many parents of autistic children describe. Until she revealed that she knew how to write, spell, compose and create.

Carly has yet to speak in the usual way, and her "behaviors," as the actions of autistic persons are often referred to, still may at times be erratic and bizarre, including hitting herself, kicking, banging her head and crying out. But as a teenager she is surviving and, in many ways, thriving compared to how she used to apparently only exist.

Arthur and her mother, Tammy, did everything they could; many friends advised them to do less, to release Carly (who has a female twin and a brother) to the gray grim world of institutionalized care. At often crushing expense, they tried the most advanced therapies; Carly had multiple one-on-one helpers from an early age because autism, to be ameliorated, has to be dealt with in the preschool years. Carly later revealed that she has extra sharp peripheral hearing, and for years she heard people saying things about her in her presence that they never would have said within the hearing of a "neuro-typical" person. So she knew that normal kids and society in general regarded her as a freak.

But one day, at age 11, she had a toothache, went to a laptop and tapped out "HELP TEETH HURT" to the astonishment of her minders. It would be a long time before she repeated this accomplishment, and a long time before her parents allowed themselves to believe that, within the shell of the child they had never communicated with, was a witty, observant teenage girl who both understood and appreciated the efforts they had been making on her behalf. This in itself refuted much of what they had been told, especially the widely held tenet that autistics have no empathy or "theory of mind."

Carly's story has continued to be both remarkable and teachable. Through her persistence she contacted Ellen DeGeneres, who has publicized her plight and her talents; Larry King interviewed her (by computer); and she had the honor of introducing the famous autistic professor Dr.Temple Grandin. Carly has a Facebook page and is always on the lookout for "cute" boys. They and potato chips can provide the incentive she needs to type out messages when all else fails. She carries on long IM conversations with Arthur, composes poetry, takes classes for gifted students at the local high school, and is writing a symbolic tale about a princess and an elephant.

CARLY'S VOICE tells us clearly that, within the tormented bodies of some autistics, there is an organized intellect crying to get out. Though all autistics must proceed at their own pace and there is no way to force even Carly to produce speech or written words on demand, still the book will offer hope to many parents of children "on the spectrum" and give them new avenues for exploration.

Reviewed by Barbara Bamberger Scott
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Carly's Voice: Breaking Through Autism
Carly's Voice: Breaking Through Autism by Arthur Fleischmann (Paperback - September 18, 2012)
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