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Carrots Love Tomatoes: Secrets of Companion Planting for Successful Gardening Paperback – January 2, 1998


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Carrots Love Tomatoes: Secrets of Companion Planting for Successful Gardening + All New Square Foot Gardening, Second Edition: The Revolutionary Way to Grow More In Less Space + Vertical Gardening: Grow Up, Not Out, for More Vegetables and Flowers in Much Less Space
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Storey Publishing, LLC; 2 edition (January 2, 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1580170277
  • ISBN-13: 978-1580170277
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (249 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #9,723 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

This gardening classic was first published in 1975, and now a second generation of gardeners who prefer pest-resistant planning to chemicals will find a place for it on the shelves. Not only does it tell what to plant with what, but also how to use herbal sprays to control insects, what wild plants to encourage in the garden, how to grow fruit and nut trees, how to start small plots or window-box gardens, and much more. It's one of the most practical books around for any gardener of edibles, no matter how serious or casual.

Review

Carrots Love Tomatoes, by Louise Riotte…a guide to companion planting that has become legendary in gardening circles ever since the first edition was printed in 1975”

 -Spokesman-Review

More About the Author

Beloved Storey author and life-long gardener Louise Riotte passed away in 1998 at the age of 89. She wrote 12 books on gardening, companion planting, and garden lore, among them the ever-popular Carrots Love Tomatoes, which has sold approximately 515,000 copies. Her father taught her to believe in and practice astrology, while her mother was a practicing herbalist. Together they inevitably influenced her life and her books, Roses Love Garlic, Astrological Gardening, Sleeping with a Sunflower, Catfish Ponds & Lily Pads, and her most recent book, Raising Animals by the Moon. Her own line drawings are included in all her books. Before authoring books, Riotte was a ghost writer for Simon & Schuster and for Jerry Baker's radio gardening show, and she wrote a number of articles for Organic Gardening as well. Riotte took pride in her garden near her home in Ardmore, Oklahoma, which her son Eugene helped care for in her later years.

Customer Reviews

I'm so glad b I bought this book.
Amazon Customer
I found this book to be helpful and I'm using the information this year in planning my garden and will use it as a reference book in the future.
booknblueslady
This is a very informational book.
Evelyn J. White

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

401 of 410 people found the following review helpful By Dianne Foster HALL OF FAME on May 15, 2003
Format: Paperback
I love CARROTS LOVE TOMATOES?an update and revision of the original companion planting book. I used many of these ideas the summer of 1975 when I had a half acre garden. My traditional farmer neighbor laughed when I told him what I was going to do, but later in the summer when the insects devastated his vegetable patch he threatened to come over and pull up all my borage and marigolds. He had to admit I was onto something. We had a few mishaps?white and yellow corn planted to close together = polka-dot corn, but we ran beans up the stalks as Riotte suggests and it worked well. The Mexican bean beatles came to visit and stayed for dinner, but we soon learned how to control them. Marigolds in the rows and our evening search to destroy the yellow egg clusters ensured a good crop. My kids learned a great deal about ?real? survival that summer and they didn?t find it on tv. We had squash, melons, tomatoes, and all sorts of other vegetables, herbs, and flowers, and mixed and matched them as companion plants. At the end of the summer, I canned like crazy and made colorful jars of green beans and white and yellow corn. Everything we grew was organic and it tasted great.
Louise Riotte includes many suggestions from the first book. Topics in the new edition include vegetables, herbs, wild plants, grasses and grains, and others. Considering what is planted where is important. For example, you should not plant peppers, eggplants, and tomatoes close together or in the same container. These vegetables are related and planting them close together inhibits growth.
Matching vegetables and herbs or avoiding combinations of vegetables and herbs that inhibit each other isn?t the only topic discussed in this book.
Read more ›
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363 of 376 people found the following review helpful By Artemis Gems on July 9, 2001
Format: Paperback
I bought both of Louise Riotte's books, only to be disappointed by the fact that companion gardening is a small portion of the book. There are several other chapters on various interesting topics, but I wouldn't bill either one as a guide to companion planting.
The book is very interesting, but don't buy it if you are trying to get started in companion planting/gardening. Buy Great Garden Companions by Sally Jean Cunningham instead. You'll get much more out of it.
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65 of 67 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 27, 1999
Format: Paperback
I love this book. Ms. Riotte has answered many questions I have had. Nicely written for those just beginning there journey into gardening. She even devotes a section solely to poisonous plants which is very interesting! Ms. Riotte breaks the chapters down as follows: Vegetables; Herbs; Wild Plants; Grasses, Grains, and Field Crops; First Steps for Home Fruit Growing; Nuts; Ornamental Trees and Shrubs; Garden Techniques; Soil Improvement; Pest Control;Poisonous Plants; Garden Plans; Sources; Suggested Reading. I like the fact that things are crossed referenced, so while it is a good read, you can also use it as a manual. The only thing I thought could be improved upon in the book was the drawings of the garden plans. They look as though someone drew them on a piece of paper and then photocopied them into the book. They are legible but hard to read. Luckily in writing they explain what they are drawing.
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121 of 133 people found the following review helpful By Bella_trix on February 22, 2007
Format: Paperback
I was absolutely horrified after reading the Fungi section in this book. Most of the information is blatantly incorrect (mushrooms are not plants, the destroying angel does not cause death in six hours, etc). Do NOT follow her belief that morels are a "safe and easy" mushroom to collect. They have several poisonous look-alikes that the beginner can easily mistake for a morel. The false morel can kill you if eaten raw or undercooked. Worse, the very inaccurate drawings in the book look much more like a false morel or elfin saddle than a true morel. As so many of the "facts" listed in the fungi section are wrong, I looked for more errors in the book and found them. It made me very suspicious of the rest of the information it contains. If you are looking for a good book on companion gardening get "Great Garden Companions, a Companion-Planting System for a Beautiful, Chemical-Free Vegetable Garden" by Sally Jean Cunningham.
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42 of 43 people found the following review helpful By Harout Katerjian on May 23, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The title of this book is somewhat misleading. There is not much help or organized content for companion gardening in this book. Whatever useful info there is it is randomly scattered through the book. For example, if you like to know what goes well with tomatoes you have to go to six different pages from the index and hope to glean something.
There is a whole lot of content about the history and use of some vegetables and herbs. Though might interesting info it is not why I bought this book.
In short, the book is nor organized well and any material content is thin. I've also purchased "The Vegetable Gardener's Bible (10th Anniversary Edition)" and found that to be a tremendous help for companion planting because there is rich content that is organized and easy to find. So my recommendation is for you to skip this and buy the Vegetable Gardener's Bible instead.
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46 of 49 people found the following review helpful By Loren Marcus (silvercloak@mindspring.com) on August 20, 1999
Format: Paperback
This is a lovely book, filled with diagrams and charts. The nature of companion benefit or detriment is clearly and thoroughly examined in the first half of the book, while the second half demonstrates how to best plan for a garden even if you have no more than a small window. The children's garden and postage stamp garden plans deserve special mention.
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