The Case of the Bloody Iris NR

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(8) IMDb 6.6/10

Beautiful Young model Jennifer Lansbury and her goofy friend Marilyn Ricci move into a swanky high-rise apartment after the previous tenant gets brutally murdered. Pretty soon Jennifer is being stalked by the mysterious Killer. Probable suspects include a Lesbian neighbor, a weird old woman and her deformed son, and even the building's handsome Architect who suffers from a severe blood phobia.

Starring:
Edwige Fenech, George Hilton
Runtime:
1 hour, 31 minutes

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27 of 27 people found the following review helpful By Daniel S. on August 14, 2002
Format: DVD
In my opinion, this Anchor Bay box set is by far one of the major DVD releases of the year 2002. These DVDs let us rediscover four italian movies directed in the seventies and unfortunately half forgotten nowadays. They belong to a peculiar genre the "giallo", a genre whose prominent figures are or were, until this release came out, Mario Bava and Dario Argento.
Two of these movies are masterpieces, SHORT NIGHT OF THE GLASS DOLLS and WHO SAW HER DIE ?, both directed by Aldo Lado. The first one is more a mystery thriller than a pure giallo with his hero Jean Sorel, left for dead in the pragian morgue and trying to remember what has happened to him while the doctors prepare his autopsy. Really frightening, a movie that creates the same terror in you than another masterpiece of the genre : George Sluizer's THE VANISHING.
WHO SAW HER DIE ? is a movie shot entirely in Venice, Italy with a haunting musical score by Ennio Morricone. The uneasiness you feel during the movie is greatly increased by the fact that the killer's main victim is a child who's the main character of WHO SAW HER DIE ? during the first 20 minutes of the film. Terrifying.
Giuliano Carnimeo's THE CASE OF THE BLOODY IRIS is perhaps the movie of the box set that fits the best in the giallo category. One or two sexy scenes with Edwige Fenech, a madman hidden in the apartment of an old lady, subjective points of view that create the nervous tension, policemen with the I.Q. of an houseplant and knives as the main companion of the killer.
Antonio Bido's THE BLOOD STAINED SHADOW is, in my opinion, the weakest of the movies presented here but still presents excellent scenes in a Venice that isn't Venice (the movie was shot in an island nearby), specially the last scene in the church.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Jeffrey Leach HALL OF FAME on January 4, 2005
Format: DVD
Antonio Bido's "The Bloodstained Shadow" begins by introducing us to a scholar named Stephano (Lino Capolicchio) returning home after many years for a visit with his brother Father Paul (Craig Hill), the local priest. Right from the start, the film also introduces us to some tensions in this little town. Paul hints at problems he has had with a few locals involved in some sort of séance group. The members consist of Nardi (Juliette Mayniel), a woman who acts as a midwife to pregnant mothers but harbors a secret she keeps hidden in her house; Count Pedrazzi (Massimo Serato), an unsavory character whose hatred for Father Paul knows no bounds and who is involved in suspicious activities with his assistant and the town's younger citizens; and a doctor who accidentally shot and killed his wife years before while cleaning a firearm. A nice bunch, eh? All suspects in the coming bloodbath, too. On the very first night Stephano spends with his brother, the murder of the woman who leads these séances takes place right outside. Father Paul witnesses the crime, in fact, but is too late to do anything to prevent the tragedy. Oddly, both Stephano and his personal assistant were outside at the time. Throw in strange paintings, Stephano's flashbacks, and a conclusion torn right from Fulci's "Don't Torture a Duckling" and you have the makings of a great giallo.

Aldo Lado's "Who Saw Her Die?" is a confusing film. I haven't seen a movie this messy since...well...never, actually. Even in the convoluted world of the giallo, "Who Saw Her Die?" stands as a cryptic statement. It's only redeeming feature in terms of plot are the relatively easy to follow opening sequences. The film begins in 1968 on some snow-capped mountains as a girl and her mother play around in the snow.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By The Magician on June 24, 2002
Format: DVD
For fans (or even those who are just curious) of European trash cinema this box is a steal.

The four films are fairly well-made, stylish examples of the giallo film made popular by Mario Bava and Dario Argento in the late sixties. And while the films included in this collection are not up to the high standard of those masters they are excellent.

The widescreen transfers are excellent--clear, detailed and colorful--they probably didn't look this good during their original release. The menu design on each disc is quite cool--each accompanied by a memorable piece of their respective scores.

"Short Night of Glass Dolls" is quite slow but fairly rewarding with a great concept and a haunting conclusion.

"Who Saw Her Die?" is by far my favorite of the set. A disturbing tale of child murders set in a creepy Venetian landscape and enhanced by a great Ennio Morricone score. Very well-crafted, acted, engrossing, suspenseful, artful... this is a superb example of the giallo... and one you won't be embarrassed to show your friends.

"The Bloodstained Shadow" is the worst of the set. It's a moderately entertaining hodge-podge of scenes cribbed from far stronger giallos, most notably "Deep Red". It does have good performances, well-composed compositions and some decent set pieces such as a murder via motor boat to keep you watching. However, the synth score is one of the most annoying I've ever heard and drags it down further.

The trashiest (and easily the most fun) is "Case of the Bloody Iris". The story has a black-gloved (of course) maniac is knocking off the groovy tenants of an apartment building. The beautiful Edwige Fenech plays a fashion model who's on the killer's list. This one has an insanely catchy theme that will ring in your head for hours. The film is only available in the box set so get it while it lasts!
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