A Case for the Existence of God and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy New
$15.37
Qty:1
  • List Price: $16.95
  • Save: $1.58 (9%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
A Case for the Existence ... has been added to your Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

A Case for the Existence of God Paperback – September 16, 2010


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$15.37
$10.73 $0.88
$15.37 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. In Stock. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.


Frequently Bought Together

A Case for the Existence of God + A Case for the Divinity of Jesus: Examining the Earliest Evidence
Price for both: $34.60

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers; 1 edition (September 16, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0742563138
  • ISBN-13: 978-0742563131
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6.1 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #978,991 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

In an age when atheists such as Christopher Hitchens, Richard Dawkins and Sam Harris are loudly challenging the existence of God, former Oxford University Templeton scholar Overman resurrects the age-old attempt to make the case for God's existence. Such arguments for God's existence dominated theology from the Middle Ages through the 18th century, and students of philosophy of religion still debate Aquinas's cosmological argument, Anselm's ontological argument and Kant's moral argument. Overman builds on Aquinas's formula by contending that we understand God's existence through an understanding of the world (cosmos). The contingency and dependence of creatures and creations reveals the existence of a Being that is a necessary Cause and neither contingent nor dependent. Overman takes this argument one step further and argues that knowledge of God is ultimately personal knowledge. He examines the ways that thinkers from Kierkegaard and Buber to Tolstoy and Simone Weil develop their own knowledge of God and proposes them as models of our knowing God. While Overman's attention to these thinkers offers a fresh approach to the case for God's existence, much of his book is a tired review of well-known materials. (Feb.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

From Booklist

*Starred Review* What would St. Anselm think? Centuries after the medieval saint framed his famous proof for the existence of a deity, a philosophically minded attorney offers a far more compelling and scientifically sophisticated argument for belief in God. Drawing on modern cosmology and information theory, Overman exposes fallacies that have infested skeptics’ thinking since Hume and Kant. Clearer reasoning establishes an astonishing harmony between quantum physics and religious orthodoxy, so providing a credible defense for free will and moral judgment. Still, readers looking for certainty will not find it here: Overman acknowledges that the believer must make a leap of faith. But consistent analysis demonstrates that atheists likewise must embrace unprovable premises, albeit premises barren of hope and meaning. Willing to challenge the logic of unbelievers such as Dawkins and Dennett, Overman goes far beyond such logic, insisting that those searching for religious truth must remain open to nonrational modes of knowledge. After all, God beckons the perplexed as a loving person, not a merely intellectual precept. The intensely personal character of spiritual conversion emerges in the lives of the nine remarkable believers—including St. Augustine and Pascal, Dostoyevsky and Weil—whose testimonies resonate with passionate conviction. A book for readers willing to wrestle with the largest questions. --Bryce Christensen --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

More About the Author

About the Author - Dean L. Overman (see www.deanoverman.com)


For several decades Dean L. Overman was a senior partner of Winston & Strawn, one of America's oldest and largest top 50 law firms. For many years he served as the partner-in-charge of the firm's Washington office, practicing corporate law on behalf of multinational clients in a broad spectrum of legal areas.

He is presently chairman of the Advisory Board of First Trust Portfolios, L.P., an asset management firm. While practicing in the area of international law, he taught a secured financing course as a member of the faculty of the University of Virginia Law School and also served as a Visiting Scholar at Harvard University. He was a White House Fellow and served as Special Assistant to Vice President Nelson Rockefeller and as Associate Director of the White House Domestic Council for President Ford.

He is the author or co-author of six law books and six law review articles. He is the author of A Case Against Accident and Self Organization, for which he was selected as a Templeton Scholar at Oxford University, the author of A Case for the Existence of God, for which he received a Templeton grant award, and the author of A Case for the Divinity of Jesus: Examining the Earliest Evidence, in which he examined how recent multi-disciplined scholarship confirms the work of his highly regarded Princeton professor, Joachim Jeremias.

He received his Juris Doctor from the University of California at Berkeley (Boalt Hall) where he was a Sheffield Sanborn Scholar. He also did graduate work at the University of Chicago and Princeton Theological Seminary and was a Reginald Heber Smith Fellow through the University of Pennsylvania Law School.

He plays a very mediocre game of tennis, can no longer slip a piece of paper under his basketball jump shot, and spoils a good walk with an erratic golf game.


For more information see www.deanoverman.com

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
5 star
10
4 star
3
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
2
See all 15 customer reviews
Easy to read and well writen, facinating to read.
D. A. Abbott
A well thought-out and presented argument for strongly considering the existence of God and our contingent existence.
Bruce
The author is clearly one who did not just "take a leap of faith".
Lana C. Couchenour

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

20 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Lana C. Couchenour on December 7, 2008
Format: Hardcover
A Case for the Existence of God is a wonderful book for those willing to take on the intellectual challenge of seeking the truth, and to help one understand the profound questions of "Why is there something rather than nothing?" and "Why do we exist?" It is a book for those who already have a strong belief in God as it provides the reader with compelling evidence. The author is clearly one who did not just "take a leap of faith". His consummate, masterful knowledge and research in this field only validate and strengthen the case for a Supreme Being. I speak from a purely layman's standpoint when I say that a few of the chapters are not easy to assimilate, but through Overman's extensive research, in not only the theological field, but in science and physics, he provides a case which is difficult to dispute, even for the hardcore atheist. Especially enjoyable and provocative are the last several chapters which address "good and evil," "recorded experiences," and witnesses testifying "to another way of knowing". I am grateful for Overman's remarkable insight, vision and intellect. He has done much of the work for the rest of us, but I agree with one of the many distinguished and brilliant scholars mentioned in Overman's book, Mortimer Adler, when he states that we have a "duty to try to understand the creed" of our religion. Overman helps us to do this in his comprehensible, luminous writing.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By rowley32256 VINE VOICE on July 31, 2009
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Former international law firm head Dean Overman wrote A Case Against Accident and Self-Organization, which was published in 1997. Now, 12 years later he has not only updated that classic, but extended his argument from a general one in favor of theism to a particular one supporting belief in God. Concise but written with the clarity and attention to detail of an attorney, Overman's new classic may be the clearest and most comprehensive apologetic in print.

Borrowing from Overman's concluding main chapter: "The existence of God explains why there is something rather than nothing; it explains the intelligibility and order in the universe; it explains the continuing existence of the universe; it explains the beginning of the universe; it explains the inherently mathematical nature of the universe; it explains the existence of laws of nature; it explains the beauty in the universe and the relationship between mathematical beauty and truth; it explains the existence of information; it explains the existence of free will and the ability to recognize good and evil; it explains religious experience; it explains the fine-tuning in the astrophysics of the universe that allows for conscious life; and it explains why thoughts have the capacity to produce true beliefs."

One might expect a primarily rational argument from an attorney; the surprise here, however, is the way in which Overman combines the accounts of nine credible individuals of their encounters with the spiritual with what is otherwise a rational and empirical argument.
Read more ›
4 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By R. D. Schau on January 13, 2009
Format: Hardcover
I too think this is a brilliant book but more importantly so does Booklist, the 100 year old journal that reviews books for public libraries and schools and makes recommendations for librarians, which gave the following starred review:

"What would St. Anselm think? Centuries after the medieval saint framed his famous proof for the existence of a deity, a philosophically minded attorney offers a far more compelling and scientifically sophisticated argument for belief in God. Drawing on modern cosmology and information theory, Overman exposes fallacies that have infested skeptics' thinking since Hume and Kant. Clearer reasoning establishes an astonishing harmony between quantum physics and religious orthodoxy, so providing a credible defense for free will and moral judgment. Still, readers looking for certainty will not find it here: Overman acknowledges that the believer must make a leap of faith. But consistent analysis demonstrates that atheists likewise must embrace unprovable premises, albeit premises barren of hope and meaning. Willing to challenge the logic of unbelievers such as Dawkins and Dennett, Overman goes far beyond such logic, insisting that those searching for religious truth must remain open to non-rational modes of knowledge. After all, God beckons the perplexed as a loving person, not a merely intellectual precept. The intensely personal character of spiritual conversion emerges in the lives of the nine remarkable believers- ncluding St. Augustine and Pascal, Dostoevsky and Weil--whose testimonies resonate with passionate conviction. A book for readers willing to wrestle with the largest questions."
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By S.D. Parker on December 16, 2009
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Dean Overman's The Case for the Existence of God is a book that I was highly anticipating before reading it. It is endorsed by both Keith Ward and John Polkinghorne, so I almost knew that it would be formidable. In this first part of the book, Overman spends time presenting Adler's modified version of Aquinas's cosmological argument from contingency. After arguing that everything that exists is either contingent or necessary, Overman argues that the universe is contingent and because it is contingent, it requires a cause.

In the next portion of the book, Overman documents the intelligibility of the universe and how this seems to cry out for an explanation. He also notes the numerous cases of apparent fine-tuning: in the formation of carbon (60), the balance between the explosive force of the Big Bang and gravity (61), the strong and weak nuclear forces, electromagnetic force (62), and so on. Overman then goes on to show how the fact of evolution does not negate the existence of a Creator - a very important point seeing how so many New and lay atheists make a disproportionately big deal out of evolution as a justification for their atheism. In this section of the book, Overman also provides a refutation (as if one was needed) of Dawkins dreadful argument against God as given in his book The God Delusion. Overman shows how it is ultimately question begging as a result of employing circular logic: "To reach his desired conclusion Dawkins begins with materialism in order to arrive at materialism. He tries to define God under a materialist definition of complexity that includes improbability in order to arrive at his conclusion" (71). Via Plantiga, the author also shows how God is, also contra Dawkins, a very simple being.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews