Customer Reviews

45
4.2 out of 5 stars
Case Logic DSB-101 Luminosity Medium DSLR with iPad Backpack (Black)
Size Name: MediumStyle Name: iPad BackpackChange
Price:$68.28 + Free shipping with Amazon Prime
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
Size Name: MediumStyle Name: Split PackVine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
If your life presents itself as a steady stream of great photo ops, you know that the main barrier to making excellent photos is timely access to your equipment. Smartphones and pocket cameras may be decent standbys, but if you've got DSLRs and/or SLRs, wouldn't it be great to have your equipment at the ready? This pack is adaptable and yet compact enough that you can fill it as a "go" bag with a DSLR, several lenses and even a pocket camera, and keep it at the ready by your front door.

I put the Case Logic DSB-102 Luminosity Medium DSLR Split Pack (Black) through its paces on several hikes, as well as a round of holiday outings, and found myself so fond of it that I've started calling it my Sam pack, in a nod to that most prepared and loyal of Hobbit companions.

The folks who designed this lightweight pack prioritized easy access, light weight, and equipment protection.

+ Split compartment enables quick access to your main camera body from the top of the pack, while enabling you to store other lenses and even another body in the customizable lower compartment. Note that the product literature bills this pocket as a place to store a jacket; I padded it with some extra camera-bag foam panels to convert it into a "quick-draw"-type pocket and find that to be a better use of the space.

+ Foam padding is thick yet lofty, and easily modified to nestle lenses, bodies and other accessories.

+ Exterior zippers are tabbed for easier use, and three of the four major exterior pockets have twin zippers for added convenience and so that the pocket can be opened in jaws-like fashion. That fourth pocket houses a rain hood for the pack, so the single tab serves as a good visual reminder of where to find the hood in case of a sudden downpour.

+ Multiple interior pockets provide separate storage for memory sticks/cards, as well as personal identification and credit cards if you're trying to travel especially light.

+ The padded waist strap stows within an exterior pouch at the back of the pack, making the pack more streamlined for stowing under an airline seat or above you in a train rack, for example.

+ Mesh facing on the key supporting parts of the pack that touch your body provide air flow for humid conditions, or when you're hiking. An adjustable horizontal chest strap helps keep the shoulder straps in position.

- My only nitpicks are a wish for a loop and a zippered pocket on the front exterior of the backpack straps, but overall, this pack is a solid performer.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
Size Name: MediumStyle Name: Split PackVine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
This bag has a lot of good features for anyone who has a medium sized DLSR and lenses and gear. The split access is key--fast way to grab your camera and yet pack a lot of gear because you can open the middle zipper and grab camera and lens. It's well-padded and very well-made with a lot of thoughtful features.

Features:

This bag has multiple pockets:

Front (for tablet, accessories, wallet, pad, pencil, personal items.)

Top compartment access (for reaching down for gear on the top compartment.)
Middle "split" section, to access bottom compartment of bag with the foam dividers for lenses and body. You can make a "hammock" with one of the dividers to nest a long lens. This makes grabbing it very quick, because you don't have to root around to lift it out. I generally alternate between a wide-angle-normal lens and a normal-to-telephoto, so this is where I stow the normal-to-telephoto.

Foldable "snake" divider (the blue piece) that makes the hammock can also be arranged "snake-style" to fit smaller gear.

Side straps for tripod

Ergonomic shaped back straps

Belly bands (able to be tucked away into their own pockets on the back)

Mesh back for sweaty backs in summer, padded for comfort

Side zip pocket with waterproof bonnet for bag (oh, yes! you will need that, if you are in weather. I'd add a  Rainsleevesrain sleeves for the camera, if you think you're going to be out in weather.

Nice pockets in front for sd cards and lens wiper

Top and bottom thick, webbing grab handles (very helpful for airplane overhead or retrieving from stowage on a boat in a hurry)

The size is about 11" Long x 10" Deep by 17" High

Weighs 3 lbs. They also say "2Kg" but that would be 4.4 lbs so that is not right. Empty it's 3lbs or about 1.5Kg.
It's made of nylon cordura, webbing, nylon mesh, and velour covered dividers. The nylon cordura feels heavy gauge and resistant to snags and tears (but that would take a trip out to the wilds to test for sure.)

I can't tell you how much I love split compartment packs. The arrangement of the straps, the stowable belly band and the waterproof bonnet make this a better bag than my other backpack.

Things to Consider:

The gear compartment on the bottom may be a bit small for very bulky, fat or tall lenses (you have the top space, however, for big lenses.) It's a bit tight for four lenses plus a body. However, if you don't need the top compartment for a spare jacket, snacks, water, and other sundries, you have plenty of room in the top.

The Case Logic bag has a lot going for it, though there are plenty of cheaper alternatives--you can get an AmazonBasics Backpack which is a lot less expensive, but no split access and the foam dividers are not very adjustable. Instead of a mesh back, it has cords to keep the nylon fabric from sticking to your shirt and making you sweaty. The Amazon basics was my previous bag and it opens by the back zipping down like a sardine lid. Easy access to gear--but not adjustable and not as well padded. And it doesn't hold nearly as much for the same size backpack. It's not nearly as good a bag--but you pay less than a 1/3 for it. So, you get what you pay for.

Summary:

Just about perfect. Worth the price. Well-made.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
on October 1, 2013
Size Name: MediumStyle Name: iPad BackpackVine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
The overall backpack is well made, rugged, and feels like it offers good protection for your camera gear. Carrying the backpack around was comfortable as it's well padded and has a lot of straps to keep the secured on your back. There are numerous compartments to hold accessories like extra batteries, filters, pens and paper, and--as advertised--a tablet device. However, the temptation with all those compartments is to fill them up, which leads to a major drawback that I encountered -- it's too small.

I first tried stuffing my 5DM3, 70-200mm, 100-400mm, 24-105mm, and 35mm which I managed to fully fit it into the pack. Unfortunately, all the compartments became so tight that I was unable to pull out the camera body from the top-access zippered opening. The "snake divider" internal padding system seems like a clever idea. However, the implementation has some problems. First, the elastic bands that are used are quite narrow and feel like they will not last long. Second, if you try to create a long/large compartment the rest of the snake divider has to get squished up and takes up a large portion of the remaining space. I think the snake divider feature is less convenient and less effective than the conventional, removeable velcro-padded divider walls.

After removing one of the telephoto lenses, I carried the body and 3 other lenses around for a day of shooting, which was quite comfortable. I don't feel like the top access opening for the camera body is all that convenient because it's, again, a bit too small to quickly and easily pull out the camera. I would believe that this backpack is best suited for someone with short lenses and a small camera body such as a mirrorless interchangeable system.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon January 6, 2014
Size Name: MediumStyle Name: Split PackVine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
A structured, well-constructed backpack that comfortably holds a small-to-modest amounts of gear, travels well, but is awkward for on-the-go shooting.

Pros: Comfortable, ergonomic backpack. Lots of useful pockets. Compact footprint for being fully-featured. Mesh-backing. Heavy padding. Structured top.

Cons: Limited space for mid-range or prosumer gear. Can't consolidate ultrabook into bag to save carrying a laptop case. Awkward-to-uncomfortable to access gear on the go. Obtrusive in warm-weather locations.

Your gear is meant to go in the bottom half, which is padded on all sides, with adjustable dividers. Adjustable dividers have become common, but these are more padded than usual and have a firm velcro grip. The top compartment is structured (so it won't get smashed flat very easily), and has a bottom layer of padding and two zippered compartments. The outside pocket has room for something flat (tablet, book) and more pockets (non-zippered), with a thin outer layer of padding. There's additional small pockets and a velcro-ed compartment in the "split" area of the pack, accessible when it's split open.

The bag's capacity is less than you might expect, with all the padding and structure for the "split". The top pocket is easily accessible and is a good place to stash a snack, a short bottle of water, extra gear bits (like a lens blower or small flash), but not much else.

The outer pocket will carry a hardback book or a tablet, but probably not both. Even the most svelte ultrabook won't fit in here (though the "netbooks" of yesteryear may fit). I'd have loved to see a little more space with a little more outer padding, so I could carry my macbook in there. But you could fit a tablet (no case) and an e-reader both in there.

As for the main attraction, it's tighter in the bottom than I expected. With a mid-sized SLR body with mid-sized lens attached, lens down (Canon 60D with the popular EF 24-105L lens), the body of the camera stuck up enough that I had to be cautious when opening the bag. Another short lens and a small hotshoe flash fit, but were very tight-- there wasn't even room for my Giottos small Rocket Air Blaster, which had to go in the top compartment. Clearly "medium DSLR and 4 lenses" is a bit of exaggeration. I'd say this bag is fitted to small/entry-level SLRs rather than mid-sized like my Canon 60D (which is similar in size to the Canon 50D, 70D, and probably 6D , 7D).

Granted I like to use the hammock, if you don't, the SLR might be more securely seated. I could have rigged the hammock and removed one divider to put my camera in sideways, at the expense of losing some space-- that would make it suitable for only a medium SLR with lens attached, and two additional items.

While it's innovative, the split design ties up some space-- and makes this bag hard to use on the go (or outdoors). You have to take the pack off (unlike a sling) to get to your gear. But, you can't do that mid-air, the pack has to be set down (bad if the ground is muddy or the pavement nasty), and to fully access the split area it needs enough space to spread open-- not something you'd want to do on the city streets, nor have room to do in a restaurant. Indoors, in a secure location, if you have enough space, this works well, but if you're shooting on the move it's really inconvenient. Shooting outdoors, do you really want to keep crouching on the ground when you need gear?

This should seem familiar to the (urban) photo-enthusiast: a few shots while you sight-see, a few later over dinner, some of the drinks later, some posed shots of your dining companions outside afterwards, some chance shots of street life... and it can be done with this bag. But with this bag you'll be wishing you were carrying a sling or dedicated camera backpack.

If you're shooting in just one place, or it's somebody's home (or otherwise "secure"), or you have furniture on which to spread the bag out-- it will work well, but for my use it was often inconvenient.

The pack is comfortable to carry, My small-build GF carried the loaded pack for me on a recent trip without any complaints about its weight or how it rides on her shoulders. The padded shoulder-straps and mesh material on the back make for a comfy carry. There's a waist strap, and *IT TUCKS AWAY*, and even tucks away comfortably flat into a dedicated compartment. This is the first backpack I've used whose waist-straps don't get in my way (I've even cut them off other packs because they were annoying).

It's a practical size for airline use, where it fits under coach-class seats on multiple aircraft without difficulty (don't know about other people, but I don't like to abandon expensive gear to the overhead bins). Getting to the camera gear in the bottom of the pack (while seated) is a bit more challenging, so alas, no SLR-taken wing photos. The pack is not obtrusive as a camera-bag, but the structure makes it look larger than its capacity would make you expect. On a recent warm-weather vacation, we took this bag, and it was great in the airport and on the plane. But then I never took it to any of the island destinations-- a big black backpack just stood out too much.

The smooth nylon surface seems durable and doesn't hold cat hair (a constant challenge for things in my household).

There's several handy or innovative features that caught my attention:

* One adjustable divider is designed to be arched into a hammock that can be fitted for your gear. Many bags have your SLR with attached lens sitting on the bottom of the bag so that the lens takes the jolt when the bag is set down-- a hammock helps cushion those jolts. It's not as nice as the SLRC-105's hammock that suspends the lens in mid-air (so the lens gets no jolt, and the hammock supports the SLR body)

* A pair of adjustable cinches on one side, designed for a tripod, but also a handy place to attach a (telescoping) hiking stick, or a luggage tag.

* That tuck-away waist-strap.

* Included lens cloth (if you needed another) and tuck-away rain cover.

I've owned and carried several Case Logic and Lowepro bags besides this one. I really like both brands, but my impression is that Lowepro is more aimed at people carrying gear professionally ("I'm off to a shoot"), while the Caselogic bags are aimed more at hobbyists and part-timers (like me) who want to keep their gear close but unobtrusive during non-photo activities. Thus the Lowepro bags are kind of clunky, more about the padding and total capacity, and the Caselogic bags are more streamlined with an urban aesthetic (and look less like camera bags).

I've tried other designs, but as solid (read: heavy) as my Canon gear is, I end up favoring a backpack (or sling). So my most heavily used bag remains the small Case Logic SLRC-205 sling, which is only useful when I don't plan to carry *any* non-camera related items, but it is lightweight, unobtrusive, surprisingly protective of the gear with padding and an advanced hammock design, and I can pull the SLR out very quickly without any fuss or needing a flat surface. Turns out that combination is often what I need, as long as I can predict what lens I'll need that day.

If you plan to travel with your smaller gear (or less of mid-sized gear), this Case Logic DSB-102 split backpack is comfortable, flexible, and well-made. But it's not particularly convenient if you plan to carry it around at your vacation destination, or outdoor setting. And it sticks out like a sore thumb in warm-weather locations (eg, tropics).

While I ding one star for it being non-optimal for my use, this is a very well-made pack. Case Logic makes a lot of decent camera bags, so if this one doesn't match your precise needs, there's likely another one that does. Recommended with caveats.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Size Name: LargeStyle Name: Split PackVine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
I've owned many photo cases and backpacks including those made by LowePro, Tamrac, Domke and a few other very well respected manufacturers.

First to comment on this very well made backpack, that it most defintely compares in quality of build and great design function to the other brands I've owned at typically a higher cost then the Case Logic.

I've owner Case Logic bags before, but, only smaller cases made for point/shoots and a smaller one to carry a mobile phone plus two or three external hard drive hard cases. In every case (oops, pardon the pun) the Case Logic was made very well made.

Without being too redundant to the other great reviews here at Amazon for this model and a solid 4 1/2+ star average rating, I can state that the DSB-103 will not disappoint you at all.

The design of this bag and its ability to be utilize two major compartments plus a smaller one for smaller items suck as moible phone, cards, pens, and maybe an iPad or mini model as well, is excellent.

It's outer nylon fabric appears strong and robust and I feel that it will hold up to rough use, some abrasion over time and multiple cleanings as required.

This back-pack is not designed to be a backpack for clothing since its function is to hold and protect your photo gear using the upper non-divided compartment and the lower compartment using multiple and adjustable velcro held dividers to hold lenses, flash, camera bodies and much more.

This backpack offers some very nice features in that the top compartment is large (but, as noted, no velcro dividers here) and can hold larger items that you need to get to in a hurry while the lower compartment seems designed more for things you want to get to, but, can take a bit more time to access.

For weight balance, between the large upper and lower compartment, theres ample room to decide how you wish to pack everything so the backpack distributes weight comfortably on your body, especially if you will be lugging some heavy gear for an extended outing.

There's plenty of room as well for the little odds and ends plus you iPad in the back zippered 3rd compartment as well. This backpack seems well protected all around with solid foam panels on most sides and a harder insert as well on the bottom and sides along with the foam protection.

The smaller 3rd location which could hold an iPad as well (although this model is not specifically the iPad version) as it does offer some padded protection, but, I suggest you have your iPad in a protective hard case or additional rubber sleeve just for piece of mind since it lies parallel to the back of backpack facing the outside of the backpack and is just behind the outer foam protected zippered flap where it could be more vulnerable to impact versus the other two larger storage locations.

A small side zipper compartment also houses a rain-cover as does the more expensive bags made by Lowe Pro and others I have used. Nice to have when the rain or heavy snow is coming down to keep your pack and gear dry. The zipper compartment could hold thinner items additionally as well along with the rain-cover.

The Care Logic also has a twin snap-buckle rubber strap system on one side to hold either a small tripod or it could hold your rain-suit or other piece of clothing you need to have handy.

For those longer lenses, the lower compartment can accept a lenses in the 9-10 inch range max with no problem. Your wide-angles, smaller zooms and fixed fl lenses should fit with no issues as well.

The top compartment is non-divided to hold perhaps a camera w/ attached lens, basically as I mentioned this compartment should be used for the gear you want to grab fast and it's in the top compartment ready to use on the fly.

I often use a few soft, thick hand towels to wrap my gear in if it is in a loose and undivided storage compartment. That way, everything is protected and yet, immediately accessible for use. Other options for the top compartment are to buy universal padded dividers which are available or make a few at home.

Creative packing is the key to maximizing any bag. I've traveled abroad a few times and fully packed smaller backpacks then this Case Logic to hold 2 full sized SLR bodies, 3-4 lenses, batteries, chargers, two flashes, cables , filters, cards, and on and on. My observation is that the Case Logic, if packaged carefully with lots of thought and planning, will hold a lot of gear and really surprise you considering it's compact external profile.

For my packing experimentation, I had to find out by trial and error the best way to make everything fit well to maximize what my bag or back-pack could carry. Don't be afraid to take an hour or so and try different combinations until you find the perfect set-up that suits you. Then take a few pics of the inside of it fully packed so the next time you remove everything to vacuum and clean the bag, you'll know exactly how everything was originally packed. I have my ..."senior moments", but, hey, ...wait,... I am a senior so am well qualified in how to forgot how I originally had a camera bag or backpack perfectly packed! :)

I prefer smaller cases wherever possible just to reduce bulk and size, if, of course, everything will fit!

This back-pack won't make your back sweat either like some back-packs I've owned did. There's ample ventilated mesh distributed in the area where it will rest on your back. The padding here also assures a comfortable carrying experience for extended use.

In summary, I'm really impressed with another fine product by Case Logic and considering the many other great reviews here and Amazon's ample and very fair 30+ day return policy, the Case Logic DSB-103 is well worth considering as you next photo back-pack.

With over 55 years in photography and a large assortment of quality cases, bags, and backpacks I've used over the years, I really have to say the Case Logic DSB-103 is a winner.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Size Name: MediumStyle Name: Split PackVine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
We always like to take our DSLR camera along and have a few favorite lenses to capture our kids, a vacation, or a quick adventure at the zoo or park. While I have a Case Logic SLRC-205 sling that i really think is the best for quick access carry, its intentionally small to be convenient and light, allowing at most the safe carry of a single additional lens.

But here's the challenge. For more engaging trips, having more of my gear available in an easier carry than a satchel is needed. This split pack has a significant amount of space in it, yet tucks everything away very safely. i like being able to carry non-camera gear or sundries in the top of the pack, keeping the weight of the camera equipment in the lower compartment that was designed for it. I imagine you can stash your primary camera body in the top for easier access, but I don't.

Pro's:
+ Space... a lot of it. Enough room for 4 decent lenses, flashes, or secondary equipment. Plenty of slip pockets for memory, lens filters, or batteries. And these pockets are padded and safe for storage without concern.
+ Ease of wear, long term comfort. This was definitely designed by a company that has a lot of experience designing backpacks, even with heavier equipment it rides well and is easy to forget the weight on your back.
+ The two shoulder straps with a joiner and padded waist belt makes this a perfect hiking, biking or motorcycle pack

Cons
+ Perfect color, if all you want is black. Would be nice to have more cool color options, especially when its already blazing hot outside.
+ The split isn't accessible when the pack is worn... so my wife cannot grab a lens out of the pack until I take it off.
+ Weight - its 3 lbs empty... which isn't much, but the structure and cushions definitely add weight.

This is what I take when the sling just doesn't carry enough for the day.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Size Name: MediumStyle Name: iPad BackpackVine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
The Luminosity Backpack has many good features for the photographer, iPad user, and travel enthusiast. It has many compartments for internal storage protection and several outside pockets, straps, and zippered compartments for easy access to small and large equipment/travel necessities.
The shoulder straps are wide, cushioned, and sturdy for hiking and there are two belts at chest and waist locations to keep the pack snugly pressed against the owner's back. The owner can even run with it for short distances with the pack remaining stable. The backpack is narrow enough to stay completely within the width of the owner's back making traveling on subways and through crowded areas easy. Yet, the pack holds a large amount of camera equipment and travel necessities because it extends straight back from the owner's body, more than most packs. It makes for a great carry on for planes, vehicles, and cruise ships. The backpack has a blue slip-on rain protector that covers the entire black backpack except for the surface that faces the owner's back.

Some exceptional specific features in addition to the general ones described above include a snake divider system that can be adjusted with one hand that fits flat in the bag when placed on its back (horizontal). The adjustments allow the owner to store multiple DSLR lenses or other vulnerable equipment in well-cushioned compartments. This snake system keeps the equipment snugly in place when the backpack is worn and the storage area becomes vertical. Another good feature is that the topmost zippered flap can be opened so a camera with a large lens attached can be placed in a compartment that extends down the length of the backpack ready for use (when the snake storage system is removed). Also, tripods or umbrellas that are longer than the backpack can be inserted in this easy access compartment and left sticking out for use when necessary (again when the snake storage system is removed).

At the top back of the backpack, an organizer opens out like an accordion file for working materials like voice recorders, notepads, viewfinders, and lens/iPad cleaners. The iPad fits snugly in its own cushioned internal compartment. There are places for the owner's wallet, passport, cell phone, keys, water bottles, and other possessions requiring fast access. Whether you are a serious photographer or a seasoned traveler with a need to have a mobile transport system for all kinds of small equipment and personal possessions, this is an outstanding Medium sized backpack.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on April 12, 2014
Size Name: LargeStyle Name: Split PackVine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
I am a nature photographer and am in nature taking pictures. It means doing a lot of walking to get to where I want to take pictures, so of course I can't do multiple trips to a location and set up. There is straps on the side to hold a tripod fairly securely.

The bottom compartment is big enough to hold my Canon T2i and multiple lens as well. It is adjust able so you could actually put a couple of cameras in this compartment. The only thing is, you have to take it off to access this compartment, since the opening is against your back, so you can't simply ask someone to take something out of this compartment, so think about what you want to put in it.

The top compartment is big enough to hold another camera or extra supplies. It is not divided or doesn't have any padding to put in-between anything, so you can only put stuff that you don't care bump into each other, or you can put in your own sort of padding between items in you need. It can also be the place to put wallets, cell phone, keys, small gray cards, extra batteries, ect. There is also a pocket area that you can put more flat things such as extra batteries and cables. It is not very padded, so you will not want to put anything fragile, but there are plenty of locations for things that are fragile. I really enjoy it.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon October 26, 2013
Size Name: MediumStyle Name: iPad BackpackVine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
This backpack is designed to help you safely carry an SLR camera and an assortment of lenses in addition to accessories and a water bottle. It has some padding that is not excessive so the is not really not very large as such things go. There are useful organizer pockets and a place for a tablet computer or similar device. It comes with a raincover. There are also no big or flashy logos that might make your bag a target for thieves. The internal dividers are very customizable. The entire internal compartment is accessible from a zipper that goes 3/4 or the way around the perimeter of the bag -- but from the side that goes toward your back. It has a waist strap that can be tucked into the back padding. It has two handles but can't really be converted to hand-held luggage since you can't stow the backpack straps. All of the external zippers have accessory pulls so yo can operate the zippers easier with gloves on.

This is a really nice camera backpack, but I don't think that it is usable as anything else, so be sure that is what you want.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Size Name: MediumStyle Name: iPad BackpackVine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
For years, my wife and I have been using an old messenger bag and a backpack to carry our camera gear and laptop. After accumulating lenses and camera accessories over the years, the old cases are too small now. The Case Logic DSB-101 is big enough, however, to carry at least one camera body and a few medium lenses, plus accessories like strobes, memory cards, and card readers. There's also a compartment for a small- to medium-sized tablet.

The backpack was clearly designed by someone who regularly carries camera equipment. I can't think of a single feature that I've wished for in a backpack that isn't covered. The main compartment for a camera body and lenses can be customized using a snake-like velcro divider, and the compartment can be accessed from either the top or the side of the backpack. I'm impressed with the build quality of the DSB-101. The fabric is heavy gauge and appears to be plenty tough and durable. The shoulder straps are padded, as is the part of the backpack that rests against your back.

But it's the extra touches that really make the backpack stand out: things like a stowaway waterproof poncho to protect the bag's contents in the rain, the waistband to help take some of the load off your shoulders, and the extra grip at the base to help put the bag into an overhead bin on a plane.

Overall, my only caveat is that the backpack isn't too big. For me the ideal backpack is one that's small enough to carry onto a plane, but big enough to carry my photographic gear and laptop computer. The DSB-101 is a bit on the smallish side, and laptops (other than perhaps a small netbook) won't fit in it.
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