The Case of the Long-Legged Models and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Case of the Long-Legged Models Paperback – January 1, 1960


See all 23 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback, January 1, 1960
$2.89

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Paperback
  • Publisher: Pocket Books; 1ST edition (1960)
  • ISBN-10: 0345378768
  • ISBN-13: 978-0345378767
  • ASIN: B000PGQTR2
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (24 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #8,486,809 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Erle Stanley Gardner (1889-1970) is a prolific American author best known for his works centered on the lawyer-detective Perry Mason. At the time of his death in March of 1970, in Ventura, California, Gardner was "the most widely read of all American writers" and "the most widely translated author in the world," according to social historian Russell Nye. The first Perry Mason novel, The Case of The Velvet Claws, published in 1933, had sold twenty-eight million copies in its first fifteen years. In the mid-1950s, the Perry Mason novels were selling at the rate of twenty thousand copies a day. There have been six motion pictures based on his work and the hugely popular Perry Mason television series starring Raymond Burr, which aired for nine years and 271 episodes.

As author William F. Nolan notes, "Gardner, more than any other writer, popularized the law profession for a mass-market audience, melding fact and fiction to achieve a unique blend; no one ever handled courtroom drama better than he did."

Richard Senate further sums up the significance of Gardner?s contribution: "Although the character of Perry Mason is not unique as a 'lawyer-sleuth,' he is the first to come to anyone's mind when it comes to sheer brilliance in solving courtroom-detective cases by rather unconventional means. Besides 'Tarzan,' 'Sherlock Holmes,' 'Superman' ? 'Perry Mason' qualifies as an American icon of popular culture in the twentieth century."

Gardner's writing has touched a lot of people including a number of high profile figures. Brian Kelleher and Diana Merrill say in their 1987 book, The Perry Mason TV Show Book that Harry S. Truman was a fan and that it is rumored that when Einstein died, a Perry Mason book was at his bedside. They further describe that when Raymond Burr met Pope John XXIII, the actor reported that the pontiff "seemed to know all about Perry Mason." Federal judge Sonya Sotomayor frequently mentions how Perry Mason was one of her earliest influences.

Starting with his first book, Gardner had a very definite vision of the shape the Perry Mason character would take:

"I want to make my hero a fighter," he wrote to his publisher, "not by having him be ruthless to women and underlings, but by creating a character who, with infinite patience jockeys his enemies into a position where he can deliver one good knockout punch."

Author Photo: Courtesy of Harry Ransom Center, The University of Texas at Austin

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
5 star
9
4 star
14
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 24 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Gary F. Taylor HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on March 20, 2005
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Erle Stanley Gardner (1889-1970) wrote more than one hundred novels over the course of his long career. A trial lawyer himself, Gardner's best known creation was Perry Mason, a flamboyant criminal defense attorney who earns his large fees by virtue of a remarkable talent for using the law to uncover the truth on the witness stand.

Stephanie Falkner's father was murdered and the crime was never solved. She has inherited the forty percent interest he owned in a small Las Vegas casino and hotel--and now someone is buying up the remaining interest and seems determined to have her share no matter what. It isn't long before murder enters the scene, and once again Perry Mason has to earn his fee the hard way.

Like all the Mason novels, THE CASE OF THE LONG-LEGGED MODELS is essentially genre fiction pure and simple, written in a workman-like manner with an emphasis on staccato dialogue. But Gardner was the peak of his powers in the 1950s, and in this 1957 title he has added a certain sparkle that raises the book above the pack: a combination of twisty plot and twisty legal angles that mix to create a fast and furious read. This one is easily among his best!

GFT, Amazon Reviewer
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By No Zombies on November 20, 2004
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Erle Stanley Gardner has a way of keeping you guessing up until the very end, and this Perry Mason novel is no exception. Even when you think you know "whodunit," you probably don't. A fun, fast read, and one of Gardner's better ones -- although they're all great!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By P. Mann VINE VOICE on March 14, 2008
Perry Mason is first consulted by a young woman whose father was apparently murdered by the mob because of his stake in a Las Vegas property. Now, the woman, Stephanie Falkner, wants Mason's help negotiating her share of the same property, having inherited it from her father. Before agreeing, Mason must check with a longstanding client, with whom there might be a conflict of interest. The client wants Mason on the case, and thus begins the trouble.

Soon, a body turns up, and it appears Falkner has killed the man who may have murdered her father. She even has a gun that's been fired once. What happens next might be called "musical guns." In an attempt to protect his client, Mason arranges for another gun to be delivered to her. Now there are two guns. Soon, a third gun turns up. (There are shades of The Case of the Demure Defendant, another Perry Mason mystery, here.) And no matter how many switches are made, it seems Mason's client is cooked. And, of course, Mason's longstanding nemesis, District Attorney Hamilton Burger, thinks he can get not only Mason's client but also Mason himself, this time as an accessory.

The Perry Mason novels are all solid mysteries/courtroom dramas. Each is an excellent example of the genre and thoroughly readable. This one is no exception.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Acute Observer on July 6, 2004
Format: Mass Market Paperback
The Case of the Long-legged Models, by Erle Stanley Gardner

This book is dedicated to Michael Anthony Luongo, M.D. who is a senior member of the Department of Legal Medicine at Harvard Medical School, an associate pathologist for the Massachusetts State Police, and certified by the American Board of Pathology. Dr. Luongo is famous of his desires for Truth and Justice.

A young lady inherits shares in a gambling place at Las Vegas. Her father had refused to sell out, and was murdered. Now the daughter is asked to sell her shares to a stranger. She seeks help and advice from Perry Mason. Perry has another client who also owns a part of this gambling place, and begins to investigate. But his client went out of town and can't be found. Perry locates him by telephone, and carries on a secure conversation; the result is that Perry will protect the young heiress. Perry meets the potential buyer to discusses the price, but nothing is resolved. While sitting outside in his car, he sees his client enter this apartment house, and then leave. Then the young heiress enters, and rushes from the house; Perry picks her up and discusses her visit. The next morning the would-be buyer is found murdered in his apartment.

Read this novel to learn why Erle Stanley Gardner was such a popular author; it is a good example of his work. Gardner was a lawyer who found fame and fortune writing about a heroic lawyer roughly based on the life of Earl Rogers. You will learn a few things about law and lawyers as part of this story. Could these tactics be possible today? The fact of blood clotting after a murder is still relevant today. "The police rarely solve gangster killings" (Chapter 1). The story follows the convention of denoting the villain as one guilty of some other crime.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By P. Mann VINE VOICE on March 14, 2008
Format: Paperback
Perry Mason is first consulted by a young woman whose father was apparently murdered by the mob because of his stake in a Las Vegas property. Now, the woman, Stephanie Falkner, wants Mason's help negotiating her share of the same property, having inherited it from her father. Before agreeing, Mason must check with a longstanding client, with whom there might be a conflict of interest. The client wants Mason on the case, and thus begins the trouble.

Soon, a body turns up, and it appears Falkner has killed the man who may have murdered her father. She even has a gun that's been fired once. What happens next might be called "musical guns." In an attempt to protect his client, Mason arranges for another gun to be delivered to her. Now there are two guns. Soon, a third gun turns up. (There are shades of The Case of the Demure Defendant, another Perry Mason mystery, here.) And no matter how many switches are made, it seems Mason's client is cooked. And, of course, Mason's longstanding nemesis, District Attorney Hamilton Burger, thinks he can get not only Mason's client but also Mason himself, this time as an accessory.

The Perry Mason novels are all solid mysteries/courtroom dramas. Each is an excellent example of the genre and thoroughly readable. This one is no exception.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search