The Case for Progressive Dispensationalism and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $24.99
  • Save: $4.53 (18%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 9 left in stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Case for Progressive Disp... has been added to your Cart
Condition: Used: Good
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Case for Progressive Dispensationalism, The Paperback – September 2, 1993

6 customer reviews

See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$20.46
$12.34 $5.53

"Tattered and Mended"
The art of healing the wounded soul. See more by Cynthia Ruchti.
$20.46 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Only 9 left in stock. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Case for Progressive Dispensationalism, The + Unfinished Business:  Returning the Ministry to the People of God
Price for both: $33.01

Buy the selected items together


Editorial Reviews

From the Back Cover

Debate abounds on the future of Israel and Israel's relation to the church, not only between dispensationalists and non-dispensationalists, but among dispensationalists themselves. In the past that debate has sometimes been acrimonious, and proponents of the differing viewpoints have found little common ground. In recent years, however, views have been modified and developed so that the dialogue is increasingly by cooperation and a mutual exploration of diverse ideas. The Case for Progressive Dispensationalism is intended to enlighten the debate in that same irenic spirit. The book is solidly dispensational in perspective in affirming that the Old Testament prophecies are completely fulfilled in the future, that the nation of Israel has a prophetic future, and that Israel is not the church. Dr. Saucy departs from classic dispensationalism, however, in showing that (1) the fulfillment of Old Testament prophecy begins in the present church age, and (2) the church is not a parenthesis in God's program but represents a continuity with the Old Testament messianic program. This modified dispensationalism seeks to satisfy many of the objections of non-dispensational approaches to eschatology while retaining the crucial elements of biblical interpretation that characterize dispensational thought.

About the Author

Robert L. Saucy is distinguished professor of systematic theology at Talbot School of Theology, Biola University, in Los Angeles.
If you buy a new print edition of this book (or purchased one in the past), you can buy the Kindle edition for only $2.99 (Save 57%). Print edition purchase must be sold by Amazon. Learn more.


Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Zondervan Publishing House (September 13, 1993)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0310304415
  • ISBN-13: 978-0310304418
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.8 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #705,949 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Robert L. Saucy is distinguished professor of systematic theology at Talbot School of Theology, Biola University, in Los Angeles.

Customer Reviews

5 star
67%
4 star
0%
3 star
33%
2 star
0%
1 star
0%
See all 6 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

34 of 35 people found the following review helpful By theologicalresearcher on April 19, 2005
Format: Paperback
For those who want a clear and scholarly presentation of this "newer" type of dispensationalism (i.e., progressive dispensationalism) that has gained much ground within conservative evangelical circles should look to this book. Saucy's book is filled with the desire to be faithful to the Scriptures and to uphold God's glory. The book is divided into four main sections: 1) Introduction; 2) The Present Age and Old Testament Prophecy; 3) The Church in Salvation History; and 4) The Place of Israel. The first section deals with the differences between dispensationalism and non-dispensationalism. The main difference being the way "the historical plan and the goal of that plan through which God will bring eternal glory to himself" is understood (p. 20). Section two deals with the Abrahamic covenant, the Mosaic covenant, the Kingdom, and the New Covenant and the salvation of the gentiles. Saucy does a good job here presenting the "already/not yet" aspects of the covenants and the kingdom. The Abrahamic and New covenants being partially fulfilled in the Church age but completely fulfilled in the Millennium. The third section deals with the church in salvation history. Saucy again does a good job presenting the case for an "already/not yet" view, yet maintaining the distinction between Israel and the Church. The fourth section deals with the place of Israel. Saucy does an excellent job showing why Israel still has a role to play in God's redemptive program and why all the OT prophecies cannot be fulfilled in the Church age. He demonstrates this by going over the OT prophetic writings, some Pauline passages (particularly Romans 11), other NT passages, and the role Israel plays in salvation history. Particularly useful is Saucy's examination of Romans 11.Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By J. Dixon on July 27, 2007
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
With all the emphasis that John MacArthur and Fred Malone [opposing views] are making concerning progressive dispensationalism (JM's view) and covenantalism (FM's view) it would be good for us to understand the 'update' that has occurred. The following review comments create great expectations for what we can learn:

"For those who want a clear and scholarly presentation of this "newer" type of dispensationalism (i.e., progressive dispensationalism) that has gained much ground within conservative evangelical circles should look to this book. Saucy's book is filled with the desire to be faithful to the Scriptures and to uphold God's glory."
"Particularly useful is Saucy's examination of Romans 11. He makes a convincing case why Paul was referring to national Israel rather than "spiritual" or "remnant" Israel in the passage. Also, Saucy's discussion of why Israel must still have a role to play in God's revelatory and salvific program is convincing (God still needs Israel to carry out His revelatory and salvific purposes). Overall, this book is a good starter for those seminarians who want a good understanding of this developing system."

For that reason, I have purchased this book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
17 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Edward J. Vasicek on December 9, 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Progressive Dispensationalism (abbreviated "PD") is a paradigm (model) useful for interpreting Scripture. It is in most ways similar to traditional Dispensationalism because it recognizes a special future for genetic Israel in the future Millennial Kingdom.

PD has a number of proponents, all with their unique twists. Saucy's version of PD is probably the closest to the traditional Dispensational viewpoint. Saucy, like other PDs, sees a limited fulfillment of Old Testament Millennial prophecies in the church. Saucy writes,"...the present age is only the inauguration and partial fulfillment of the prophecies."

Early on, Saucy argues that the literal tabernacle (for example) was a type fulfilled in Christ. The literal then the spiritual. OT prophecy regarding the Kingdom Age is the mirror image: some of them, at least, are first fulfilled spiritually in the church and then literally as promised to Israel during the Millennium. A spiritual application does not preclude a literal fulfillment.

Saucy then demonstrates that this is how the NT authors quote the OT prophecies of the conversion of the gentiles (and apply them to the church). Whether it be the End Time prophecy of Joel quoted in Acts 2, or the New Covenant, the NT authors' use of the OT is problematic with Traditional Dispensationalism. The problem evaporates when a PD hermeneutic is applied.

Yet the NT authors expected a literal fulfillment of the prophecies given to Israel, terminology unchanged (thus exposing the problem with Covenant and replacement viewpoints). Again, the problem is solved with a PD hermeneutic.
Read more ›
4 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
Case for Progressive Dispensationalism, The
This item: Case for Progressive Dispensationalism, The
Price: $20.46
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com