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94 of 97 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars First Experience with a Casio Keyboard
Let me start by saying that I picked this up primarily to use for silent practice. I am an adult taking lessons and have a Yamaha acoustic piano that I love. I wanted something that I could use without disturbing the rest of the family (or driving them crazy listening to the same piece a hundred times over). I'm not using any of the interface functions as of yet (and...
Published 21 months ago by T.D.

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25 of 25 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Worked for a few months then problems began ...
When we first got this we absolutely loved it. Great action, decent sound, felt as good as the 1500 yamaha electronic keyboards. However, after about 6 months, the lowest register black keys began to go out of tune with the white keys, Playing major 3rd's in the bottom octave became almost painful to listen to.

Casio repair sent me to the *only* designated...
Published 9 months ago by D. Jacoby


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94 of 97 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars First Experience with a Casio Keyboard, December 5, 2012
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Casio CAS PX150 BK 88-Key Touch Sensitive Privia Digital Piano with Tri-Sensor Scaled Hammer Action (Electronics)
Let me start by saying that I picked this up primarily to use for silent practice. I am an adult taking lessons and have a Yamaha acoustic piano that I love. I wanted something that I could use without disturbing the rest of the family (or driving them crazy listening to the same piece a hundred times over). I'm not using any of the interface functions as of yet (and probably won't). I had picked up the Yamaha DGX-530 initially, but discovered a defect in the keyboard so returned it. I wasn't pleased with the "lightly weighted" keys of the DGX-530 (though all of the voices were fun to play with), so decided its replacement needed a more piano like action.

This Casio has a heavier touch than my Yamaha acoustic does, but makes it easier to transition between the acoustic and the Casio than the DGX-530 would have. It does have a few voices (eighteen I believe, some of which are piano variations) and the ability to do some dual voices with the strings, but again, my desire for this was primarily for silent (or at least quiet) practice. The speakers in the Casio are average, I tend to start out with the speakers but transition to headphones if I'm going to sit for any length of time, the sound coming thru headphones just sound nicer. I get some noise from the keys, but it is more thuddy than clicky. I am impressed with how the keyboard mimics the audio nuances of a piano, acting very much like an acoustic when you manipulate the keys with different pressures, quite realistic. The texturing of the keys is nicer than your typical digital keyboard (at least in this price range). The power adapter and a cheaper style sustain pedal are included. I picked up a Stagg KXS-A6 X style stand for it that works nicely, but be aware that the PX150 seems to be a thicker unit, as it sits a little higher on this stand than I'd like when sitting (and I'm a little over 6' tall, so that stand probably wouldn't be a good one for kids).

Overall I'm very pleased with the build quality and realism of the PX150. A better speaker system would be nice, but is an acceptable trade off for me given the other features and price. The PX150 has been a great unit for the purpose I was searching for!
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65 of 69 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An amazing piece of technology, March 10, 2013
This review is from: Casio CAS PX150 BK 88-Key Touch Sensitive Privia Digital Piano with Tri-Sensor Scaled Hammer Action (Electronics)
I'm a professional keyboardist but not a pro piano player.

OK. This keyboard doesn't have any of the bells and whistles of the higher model Privias and Celviano digital pianos. It doesn't have an LED screen. It only has 18 voices. It doesn't have line outs. It doesn't have lines in. It doesn't have a USB flash drive input. It comes with cheap speakers.

But this keyboard has the same key bed and the same sound engine for its concert grand piano that the higher models have. So through headphones or through a stereo system, the PX-150 will sound just as good as Casio's highest model.

And let me tell you, this keyboard has a fantastic set of keys and a superb grand piano.

The keys are made to feel like ivory and ebony keys. They have a light grain to them. They feel like expensive piano keys, not like plastic keyboard keys. The keys are progressively heavier and slower as you go down and lighter and faster as you go up the scale like a real grand piano. The keyboard has wonderful resonance. On a real piano, if you play three notes with the damper pedal pressed, you will hear the sympathetic vibration of the strings that aren't being played. Casio has modeled this effect. A typical MIDI keyboard will transmit 127 different levels of velocity depending on how it's played. The Casio delivers 16,256 levels!

Only one voice on the keyboard has all of this detail, the concert grand piano. Through my $130 200W Logitech speakers that have a subwoofer and two satellites (keep the satellites resting on top of the PX-150 speakers) the Casio sounds just breathtaking. I can get thunderous fortes and the quietest pianissimos. There is balance throughout the keyboard's range. Casio's previous model had a quick decay in the midrange that frustrated me. The PX-150 has detailed expression. I am in love with this keyboard.

The other pianos and voices? They're very good. The electric piano is excellent. It has a great Rhodes sound.

Part of me wishes that I had spent the extra $200 for the PX-350 so that I could have the lines in and the USB flash input. The PX-150 does have a USB to host, and it can be used with some iPad apps. I would recommend that people buy the PX-350, but I was on a budget. And my PX-150 through these Logitechs sounds better than the PX-350 would through its onboard speakers.

All I can say is that I couldn't be any happier with the piano feel and the piano sound on this keyboard. It sounds just astounding through my $130 speakers. I can only imagine what it would sound like through an expensive sound system.
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47 of 50 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic product for the price! (EDITED 2-28-14), July 7, 2013
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Casio CAS PX150 BK 88-Key Touch Sensitive Privia Digital Piano with Tri-Sensor Scaled Hammer Action (Electronics)
UPDATE:
After having this product awhile, I wanted to mention that the glossy dashboard does collect minor scratches if you set devices on it. Phones, metronomes, voice recorders, etc WILL over time cause some minor scratches. Kind of wish I had thought of that and not put stuff on it! Definitely not worth costing it a review star, nor should it cause you to avoid purchasing it. Just be aware when using it!

---
ORIGINAL REVIEW:
I bought this about 3 weeks ago, and I have a lot to say about it that deserves a review. I absolutely adore this keyboard!!! I'll start with the cons to end on the positive note.

***Cons***
- CHEAP SPEAKERS: What more could you expect from the cheaper base model, though? The speaker sound is somewhat sub-quality, but it's not bad. Volume turned all the way up is only a hair short of the volume of an acoustic. The nice thing is the speaker vibrates the keyboard in a way that feels a little more real! Personally I would rather pay this price for these speakers and spend extra for a set of Bose for in-home/office/studio use just so you actually use top of the line speakers for the money.
- TOUCH: is by default too "hard." What this means is you have to play harder to get the sound of a real piano. For those of us who typically have a habitually hard touch, that's not a good situation to practice on because on an acoustic we would have to play much lighter than we practice, right? THE GOOD NEWS is that the Touch Response 1 setting (lightest touch) gets significantly more bang for your buck, and it actually borderlines feeling like and getting the sound of a real piano! Much more metallic sound that way too, similar to an acoustic.
- SOUND: is by default too "bright." By default the piano gets a bit too much "shrillness" in the sound without the meatier, lower overtones. THE GOOD NEWS is that if you move the bright/mellow (or whatever) setting DOWN 2 CLICKS toward mellow, you can take the edge off the tone. Note that I said only 2 clicks; if you turn it all the way mellow, you'll take the brilliance out of the top. 2 clicks is my recommendation for finding a more realistic sound.

***Cons RECOMMENDATIONS***
Again, all the cons I've found can easily be remedied. 1) Buy some top of the line speakers with the money you'd have otherwise spent on a higher model with better built-in but not-so-revolutionary speaker technology. 2) Set the TOUCH to "1" for a more realistic response. 3) Mellow the sound two clicks. 4) Save these custom settings with the FUNCTION button with the B at the top of the keyboard (second key from the top) so they're your startup settings, and any further changes will revert to these after you turn it off and back on.

***Pros***
- IVORY STYLE KEYS: Oh my gosh. These keys are brilliant! One of my biggest disgusts with most electronic keyboards is the cheap plastic feel. Yes most modern acoustics have similar plastic keys, but they're just not the same. The ivory-style keys feel FANTASTIC. On a functional note (aside from aesthetic), the usefulness of this is you get more friction on your fingers. Your fingers won't slide around as badly, and you get a much more instant grip. I believe this to be a very redeeming quality for any serious keyboardist.
- WEIGHTED KEYS: Not only are the keys weighted... They are weighted heavier on bottom and lighter on top to imitate a real piano where there are thicker, longer strings for lower pitches. It's quite brilliant and feels wonderful. That combined with the keyboard's vibrations get a very nice "real feel."
- SOUND: Speaker system aside, the actual digital sound is VERY rich for a keyboard. It has a very classical, authentic tone. I'm not sure how it would sound on premium speakers yet, but I bet it's WONDERFUL. GREAT, GREAT resonance technology. The touch sensors really help the keyboard respond, too.
- LIGHTWEIGHT BUT STURDY: When I read this was one of the most lightweight full-sized keyboards on the market, I was thinking UGH... It'll probably be a little unstable on an X-figure stand. Nope. It is very sturdy and doesn't budge. Brilliant!
- SIMPLE YET POWERFUL: If you want all the crap nonsense that comes with a higher tech, just plug it in and use computer software... I mean really... Any serious musician would invest in the real instruments anyway. This has everything you actually NEED, plus a few extras. It has a great harpsichord function suitable to practice baroque keyboarding on, plus plenty of other things. Less fluff makes for simpler access to stuff that's actually useful. There is power in simplicity, and it's great to have everything based off the FUNCTION with keyboard keys for quick access. Really, are the features of a higher model SERIOUSLY worth paying hundreds more dollars for? I'd rather use the money to invest in a fantastic pair of speakers.
- ELEGANT DESIGN/LOOK: Between the sleek dash and the ivory-style keys, it's very pleasing on the eyes. It looks very elegant instead of like a block of shiny cheap plastic.
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25 of 25 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Worked for a few months then problems began ..., December 8, 2013
By 
D. Jacoby "DJ" (New York, NY United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Casio CAS PX150 BK 88-Key Touch Sensitive Privia Digital Piano with Tri-Sensor Scaled Hammer Action (Electronics)
When we first got this we absolutely loved it. Great action, decent sound, felt as good as the 1500 yamaha electronic keyboards. However, after about 6 months, the lowest register black keys began to go out of tune with the white keys, Playing major 3rd's in the bottom octave became almost painful to listen to.

Casio repair sent me to the *only* designated repair shop in the new york area - a small shop in 30th street in manhattan. I dropped the keyboard off, and within 20 minutes he called me back and said 'nothing he could fix. didnt have a calibration setting.'

I called Casio back, and they were not helpful either. At this point, the dissonance had spread and now the bottom fifteen or so keys were out of tune. I am trying to get Casio to replace the unit, as it seems to not be 'repairable' but so far no luck.

So - not sure if this is a widespread problem, but I would not buy again.
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47 of 54 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Compare Yamaha P-105 with Casio Privia PX150, October 15, 2013
This review is from: Casio CAS PX150 BK 88-Key Touch Sensitive Privia Digital Piano with Tri-Sensor Scaled Hammer Action (Electronics)
This review is for the serious gigging pianist who wants to compare the two best 88-key weighted-action stage pianos for $600 or less; the Yamaha P-105 and the Casio Privia PX150. I do not own either one, but have recently played on both, side-by-side, with the same pair of headphones, so I believe I have useful information. Keep in mind that no review will substitute for hands-on (and ears-on) experience.

So that you know where I'm coming from: I've been playing professionally for 35 years, on acoustic grands, and on digital pianos. I require decent weighted action, 88 keys, and authentic piano sound. Aside from a couple of good electric piano voices, I use my stage piano for piano only. I have a separate synth for everything else. Currently my stage piano is a Yamaha CP33. Like all excellent digital pianos, the CP33 is heavy (40 lbs), so I've been shopping for something lighter. Hence, my experience with the Yamaha P-105 and the Casio PX150.

Assuming similar lasting durability, either piano will serve you well. They both sound and feel very good. You've heard that from half a dozen reviews, so here are more specific impressions.

Right off, let me tell you that if you intend to use the onboard speakers, don't waste your time with the Casio. Its speaker system does not compare to the Yamaha's. The Yami's speakers are not superb, but they are acceptable, and I would consider playing the P-105 through its speakers as a soloist in a small venue. The Casio would require a separate speaker system. Even at home I could not live with the Casio's onboard speaker system.

Since most serious stage pianists use separate speaker systems anyway, the important thing is the quality of the piano sound itself. Through headphones both pianos are very close in quality. The only difference that bothered me was that, when I played fast chromatic runs in the midrange, between C4 and G5, the Casio took on a strange rubbery sound. i don't know how else to explain it. It's not detectable when listening through its speakers, so I wonder if it can be heard through a good sound system. It would be a deal breaker. For now, I certainly trust the headphones over the onboard speakers.

I won't go into number and quality of other voices, because they are good on both models, and you can read about them elsewhere.

The Casio's key tops have a texture to them that you may find pleasing. It's interesting, but honestly, I don't think it would make a bit of difference to me during performance. If you have a problem with finger slippage due to perspiration, you might appreciate this texture. I would tend to shy away from it, because I also play acoustic pianos, so it doesn't make sense to get accustomed to something so novel.

Both are delightfully light for weighted action boards. The Casio is 24 lbs, the Yami 26. With a 4-lb case I would be carrying 30 lbs instead of my current board-in-case weight of 54!

When I get the chance to play both models through a decent sound system I will update my review.

So, I would call it a tie, even with the Yami costing $100 more, because, even though I don't use onboard speakers often, it's worth the extra bucks having the option. Action and sound are comparable, except for the rubbery sound I heard with the Casio, which I will have to test for with a sound system.
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45 of 52 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars great keyboard, January 27, 2013
By 
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This review is from: Casio CAS PX150 BK 88-Key Touch Sensitive Privia Digital Piano with Tri-Sensor Scaled Hammer Action (Electronics)
I am a piano teacher, I also accompany, and play for weddings, funerals, school plays, etc. I am always at the mercy of whatever piano is at a facility any time I want to have a recital or program. Sometimes I can get the venue to tune their piano but not always so I would have to pay to get that done myself. I have been jealous of other musicians, like guitar players, that always bring their own instrument, they practice on it, it is in tune, and they chose it. I purchased this a couple of months ago and used it at my Christmas recital. My students did not complain about playing on a keyboard since it feels and sounds like the acoustic in my studio. It is in tune and sounds and feels like a real piano. I did not want a synthesizer so other sounds are not all that important to me but I did have fun with the included sounds and may use them from time to time with my own projects. Again, I am not an instrument snob since I have played on broken down-stored-in-the-basement pianos and still have gotten the job done. But I think this is as nice a sound and feel of some of the nicer pianos I have played. Overall, it is a nice keyboard that delivers for a performance.
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40 of 46 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I love this Piano!!!, January 13, 2013
This review is from: Casio CAS PX150 BK 88-Key Touch Sensitive Privia Digital Piano with Tri-Sensor Scaled Hammer Action (Electronics)
I decided to learn to play the piano after years of watching others.Since that time I have had 5 different digital pianos Casio CDP120(love the feel of this one but it didn't have an organ sound),KorgSP170S(loved the feel of this one as well but it didn't have a USB midi, conuldn't properly connect it to my computer with midi to usb cord), Casio px130(I hated the sounds of the keys on this model, the sounds were all bad), casiowk7500(this is a great system for someone other than myself although the draw-bars are disappointing for someone interesting in true Hammond sounds...nevertheless it was a great system. Not for someone who just wanted piano sounds and a few organs). Now on the to the PX150 - I really like this system the keys feel and sound great not clicking sound not really plastic feeling with the new ivory touch. Overall it has everything I like although, I wish they could add fully functional draw-bars for the jazz organ section that would be wonderful. You can't go wrong with this model. Also I bought mines from proaudiostar.com open box full warranty for 469....great buy.
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18 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Don't be nervous!, June 28, 2013
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Casio CAS PX150 BK 88-Key Touch Sensitive Privia Digital Piano with Tri-Sensor Scaled Hammer Action (Electronics)
Being a music major in college who has earned my associates and am advancing to a university to pursue a bachelors, I did plenty of research about what kind of keyboard I was wanting before I began looking around. I am a piano primary and needed to purchase a good keyboard for when I need to practice in my apartment with headphones. I wanted something that felt like an acoustic piano and sounded close to one too.

When I read the reviews and checked out the features of the Casio PX-150, I immediately considered this keyboard to be my number one choice. I researched further and looked for other keyboards, but it all came back to this one. When I received the keyboard, it was packaged very well (Casio is good about that) and when I finally lay my eyes on it... it was BEAUTIFUL! All the excitement from any Christmas ever was funneled into me in that moment and I had to stop myself from shouting for joy.

You must be wondering: "Well, what about the sound? That is what is important." Let me tell you about the sound... I thought the keyboard looked beautiful, but I was worried it would sound awful when I plugged it in and tried it out. My word, it sounded even more beautiful than how it looked, and for a moment I forgot I was even playing on a keyboard.

This is a brilliant purchase if you are wanting the acoustic piano feel and sound, but without the acoustic piano price, volume, and size. I would recommend this keyboard to anybody who is interested in having a keyboard to practice on that won't cause them to have to adjust back to the acoustic piano when they play that.
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Pros:
The feel of an acoustic piano
Gorgeous tone
Sturdy construction
Beautiful to look at
Comes with power adapter, sustain pedal, pop-in music stand, and a book containing 60 piano pieces from beginner to advanced
Perfect for practicing without making a real acoustic piano feel awkward.

Cons:
I can't stop playing it
It is habit forming
It can cause random bouts of uncontrollable joy

REAL Cons:
It is kind of heavy and awkward to carry (expected)
...That is it. That is the only flaw I have found.
---
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18 of 21 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The feel is incredible, the speakers aren't, June 6, 2013
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This review is from: Casio CAS PX150 BK 88-Key Touch Sensitive Privia Digital Piano with Tri-Sensor Scaled Hammer Action (Electronics)
Here's how I breakdown this keyboard:

Touch sensitivity: 3.5/5. I have played keyboards with just 1 setting not 3 like here that were better. While this is still fine, it's just not that competitive.

Feel: 5/5. As close to real ivory as you can get imo.

Hammer action: 5/5. Some have complained it's noisy. Yes there's noise but how real piano keys would sound. Feels like the real thing. I love moving my fingers on this.

Speakers: 1/5. Disappointed here, however easily fixed with good speakers attached.

Tone and sounds: 5/5. It's the speakers that make the first 3 piano settings (Concert, Classic and Modern) sound so muffled, no matter how high you increase the volume, sounds like I have cotton balls in my ears.
If you switch to any other tone besides those 3, it sounds beautiful. Those are the 3 I prefer to use the most but attached speakers fixed this issue and it sounds beautiful.
I used to have a keyboard with a much larger selection of sounds. A little fun to play them all when bored, but overall for serious play and practice I just stuck to the grand pianos anyway.

Ease of use: 5/5. Simple.
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18 of 21 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars nothing headphones cant fix., December 25, 2012
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Casio CAS PX150 BK 88-Key Touch Sensitive Privia Digital Piano with Tri-Sensor Scaled Hammer Action (Electronics)
I'm new to keyboards, and I got this one to tie me over untill I have space to unpack my piano.

My first impressions were dissappointing, as the keys were noisy and the sound quality was poor.

As soon as I got myself a decent pair of headphones my impression changed dramatically, the sound quality is excellent and you can't hear the key action anymore (at a high enough volume). Its not a piano-but I'll happily hang onto it even after I've got space for the real thing-It means that I can play when others would otherwise rather be sleeping ;)

If you are looking for a keyboard with good playability and sound then this is a safe bet. This and a good pair of headphones (or two).
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