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  • Casio PX-330 88 Key Digital Stage Piano with Tri-Sensor Scaled Hammer Action
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Casio PX-330 88 Key Digital Stage Piano with Tri-Sensor Scaled Hammer Action

by Casio
| 3 answered questions

List Price: $899.95
Price: $699.00 & FREE Shipping
You Save: $200.95 (22%)
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  • 88 weighted, scaled hammer-action keys
  • 128-note polyphony
  • 250 tones (with layer and split)
  • Reverb (4 types), Chorus (4 types), Brilliance (-3 to 0 to 3), Acoustic Resonance
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Frequently Bought Together

Casio PX-330 88 Key Digital Stage Piano with Tri-Sensor Scaled Hammer Action + Casio CS-67 Keyboard Stand for PX130, PX150, PX330 and PX350
Price for both: $789.15

These items are shipped from and sold by different sellers.

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Product Details

  • Product Dimensions: 58 x 10 x 15 inches ; 34 pounds
  • Shipping Weight: 59.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Shipping: Currently, item can be shipped only within the U.S. and to APO/FPO addresses. For APO/FPO shipments, please check with the manufacturer regarding warranty and support issues.
  • Shipping Advisory: This item must be shipped separately from other items in your order. Additional shipping charges will not apply.
  • ASIN: B002IVI970
  • Item model number: CAS PX330
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (33 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #40,523 in Musical Instruments (See Top 100 in Musical Instruments)
  • Date first available at Amazon.com: September 14, 2004

Product Description

Product Description

The new Casio Privia PX-330 redefines the digital piano category with unprecedented sound quality and performance in a sleek package that is supremely portable. Featuring all new grand piano samples and a new Tri-Sensor 88-note scaled hammer action keyboard and weighing only 26 lbs., the Casio Privia PX-330 is versatile enough for any home, studio or stage.

Amazon.com

The new Casio Privia PX-330 redefines the digital piano category with unprecedented sound quality and performance in a sleek package that is supremely portable. Featuring all new grand piano samples and a new Tri-Sensor 88-note scaled hammer action keyboard and weighing only 26 lbs., the Casio Privia PX-330 is versatile enough for any home, studio or stage.

A sleek, portable digital piano with great piano samples and a wealth of other features. Click to enlarge.

A grand piano sound with seamless transitions and a superior dynamic range.

Add a wooden stand and three-pedal unit for an even more piano-like experience.

Realism, Expression and Dynamics
The grand piano sounds in the PX-330 delivers an unprecedented level of realism and expression. Four dynamic layers of stereo piano samples are integrated with Casio's proprietary Linear Morphing System, for a grand piano sound with seamless transitions and a superior dynamic range. For added realism, the PX-330 simulates the sound of the open strings when the dampers are raised by the pedal using Acoustic Resonance DSP. The PX-330 also has 128-note polyphony, enough horsepower for the most demanding musical passages and the ability to layer sounds and use the damper pedal without worry of dropped notes. The result is a grand piano experience that is unsurpassed at any price.

Truly Expressive Touch
The Privia PX-330 features a new Tri-Sensor 88-note scaled hammer action keyboard. Casio's superior engineering has resulted in an authentic piano touch that captures every detail and nuance of your performance. This scaled hammer action provides the weight, feel and resistance of a piano without sacrificing the portability of the instrument.

Performance, Studio or Stage
The superior keyboard action, piano sound and built-in USB MIDI interface make the PX-330 the perfect instrument to integrate into your studio. When you're ready to take the PX-330 to a gig, the built-in registration memory allows you to instantly recall splits, layers and combinations of sounds. The PX-330 also has 1/4-inch outputs for great live sound from your amp or the house's PA system.

16-Track Recorder, Pitchbend Wheel and Much More
While it's easy to connect the PX-330 to your computer, you can easily create and compose music using internal 16 track recorder. Utilizing the PX-330's 250 on-board sounds and 180 rhythms you can record up to 16 tracks. Accepting SD memory, you can save your songs and take them with you or load standard MIDI files that you've downloaded from the web. With these flexible tools you can capture moments of creativity and remember song ideas. It also works great as a practice tool. A built-in metronome and optional accompaniment mean you can practice in-time and later listen back to what you just played. A pitchbend wheel gives you full expression for 250 tones. You can even plug in other instruments or an MP3 player into the keyboard and hear it through the internal speakers and headphones.

Professional, Versatile and Portable Design
Whether you're at home, working on a studio or out on stage, the PX-330 was created to tackle it all, making it a valuable investment. With its light weight, you can easily take the PX-330 from home, to rehearsals, to the gig and back with no worries. It connects effortlessly to your computer via USB and connects just as easily to a live mixer for use on stage. The Casio PX-330 is now the indisputable leader in the digital piano arena.

8 Digital Effects
Add a little more depth and variation to the built-in tones with 4 reverb and 4 chorus effects, along with brilliance and acoustic resonance settings.

Duet Function
The new duet functions allows teachers and pupils to play parallel to each other. The PX-120 can be divided into two keyboard areas, which can be transposed individually.

Two Headphone Connections
The PX-330 features two headphone connections, ideal for the duet function.

Stereo Line In/Out
Connect to a PA system or studio equipment, or connect other sound sources with the line inputs.

Powerful Speaker System
The PX-330 features built-in speakers, with 2 x 8 Watts of output power, to fill a room with sound.

3-Pedal Unit Support
With the optional SP-30, the PX-320 has up to three pedals with half-damper effect. This "half-damper" effect simulates a "half-pedaled" damper pedal.

What's in the Box
Privia PX-330 Keyboard, AC Adapter, Music Stand, User's Manual


Customer Questions & Answers

Customer Reviews

"Hammer action" is supposed to replicate the feel of a real acoustic piano.
Denver Jazz Fan
In fact, I think the keyboard action does a remarkably good job of replicating the feel of a real acoustic piano -- even that subtle clicky feel.
Quinkin
Most importantly - I saved about 3K buying this piano compared to other similarly performing electronic pianos.
Lux et Veritas

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

153 of 154 people found the following review helpful By Ray Lyon on May 30, 2010
I am a professional jazz pianist of some 30+ years. I recently bought this keyboard as a much needed gigging and practicing piano that was light weight, had built in speakers, 88 note key weighted action and a good piano sound. You will find all of this and more in the PX-330. I don't think there is any other keyboard currently being manufactured that provides all these features at this low a price point.

Pros:

- great weighted action... a bit mushy but one can certainly adapt to it easily.
- good piano sound, but not without its faults (see below) It reminds me of the sound of the Kurzweil pianos.
- auto arranger with tons of grooves for practicing and jamming.
- good selection of song style presets... it even has "Giant Steps" for all you jazz pianists to practice on. Any tempo, Any key.
- some interesting world beat grooves are included along with standard pop, rock, latin, etc. grooves
- weighs only 25 lbs... this is one of the best features of all!
- skinny... easy to carry
- built in speakers lead to instant gratification when turning on the keyboard and playing. You just sit down and play. No muss, no fuss.
- good contruction. Uses alot of plastic. Not as good as Roland or Yamaha but good enough
- pitch bend wheel is a surprise bonus
- nice LCD display is a big improvement over previous models
- line inputs let you bring in a submix from an mp3 player, iPod, or mixer
- two separate 1/8" mini stereo headphone outs
- good for education and dual playing... the keyboard can be split into duet mode each playing the same sound
- the auto harmony feature is very good and alot of fun to play around with. (dual voice, three voice, etc.
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75 of 79 people found the following review helpful By PenName on October 24, 2009
Verified Purchase
This review is for the Casio Privia PX330:

Overall I really like this keyboard for practicing quietly at night and for connecting to a computer. I've been playing it for about a month. Here are my thoughts so far:

Key Touch Sensitivity:
The Casio web site advertisement states: "authentic piano touch that captures every detail and nuance of your performance". If that is your expectation, you will probably be disappointed with this keyboard. I have compared the Casio with two pianos that I play regularly (a Yamaha Baby Grand and a Spinet) and the Casio falls short of both pianos in this area. The Casio keys feel harder to press and do not have the volume/pressure sensitivity or dynamic range of the real pianos.

On the up side I will say that the Casio keyboard touch feels much better than other electronic keyboards I have tried in this price range and it also does a decent job of changing the volume depending upon how hard you press the keys.

Sound:
The keyboard sound using my own headphones (Sony MDR-V6) is great. The on-board speakers are ok, but sound a bit muffled on some of the piano styles. (Fortunately you can buy external speakers and connect them to this keyboard.)

Construction.
The keyboard is fairly light weight and not too hard to move around (although I'd wish it had carrying handles). The plastic music stand (included) and parts of the keyboard appear a bit on the thin side.

The keys visually look large, but I can't really explain why. I measured the entire width of all the keys and it is a match to my real piano.

Connectivity:
I've used the USB connection to my computer with no problems (Windows XP).

Functions:
Tons of functionality. The ones I've tried work well.
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27 of 28 people found the following review helpful By Denver Jazz Fan on October 9, 2011
This digital piano offers a tremendous amount for the price, but it's not perfect.

Overall:
- Best bang for the buck, if you want a piano first, and general keyboard second.
- Enough features to make it a great practice instrument
- Keyboard sounds genuine enough to be useful in any band setting
- Most realistic dynamics and bass/treble balance of any digital piano I have ever used
- Includes a genuine Sostenuto pedal function - I've never seen this in a digital piano at any price
- "issues" include one biggie and a few annoyances more than anything else

"Graded Hammer Action":
The "hammer action" seems to vary from unit to unit. "Hammer action" is supposed to replicate the feel of a real acoustic piano. Acoustic pianos employ an escapement mechanism. You can detect the operation of this by slowly pressing a key. At about 3/4 of the way pressed, the pressure required drops dramatically - this is when the key mechanism has released the hammer. In principle, Casio has created a genuine escapement mechanism in their Privia series. At the store, demoing the instruments, I could detect its presence. However, on the unit I ordered, I do not. The weight of the keys is notably heavier than that of my genuine six-foot grand piano. Perhaps there is a break-in period required for this mechanism, just as it is on an acoustic piano. Time will tell. "Graded" implies that the heft of a key is heavier on the low notes than the high notes. Compared to a grand piano, I think it's somewhat exaggerated on this 'board, but quite passable.

Dyamics:
One of the first things that's done wrong in digital pianos is the dynamics. That is, if you hit a note with more force, does it sound louder AND brighter?
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