Castle of the Living Dead 1964 NR

Amazon Instant Video

(16) IMDb 5.7/10

(1964) A troupe of entertainers finds themselves in peril as guests in Lee's mysterious old castle. This top-notch euro-horror film was also Sutherland's first film. Lee is terrific. Creepy and atmospheric from start to finish. From 16mm.

Starring:
Christopher Lee, Gaia Germani
Runtime:
1 hour, 31 minutes

Available to watch on supported devices.

Castle of the Living Dead

By placing your order, you agree to our Terms of Use. Sold by Amazon Digital Services, Inc. Additional taxes may apply.

Product Details

Genres Science Fiction, Thriller, Horror
Director Warren Kiefer, Luciano Ricci, Michael Reeves
Starring Christopher Lee, Gaia Germani
Supporting actors Philippe Leroy, Mirko Valentin, Donald Sutherland, Renato Terra, Antonio De Martino, Luciano Pigozzi, Ennio Antonelli, Jacques Stany, Luigi Bonos, David de Keyser, Robert Rietty
Studio Sinister Cinema
MPAA rating NR (Not Rated)
Rental rights 7-day viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Other Formats

Customer Reviews

If you like old movies, this is a great one!
Patrick Cook
Sometimes you can go into things expecting one thing and getting another, and thus you don't give it a fair review.
Daniel Delaware
Christopher Lee is, as usual, on top form as Count Drago.
jackgavin

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

22 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Nostalgicman on November 25, 2008
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
This movie is worth buying due to at least four considerations: (1) Christopher Lee plays a nice character (the scene in which he appears for the first time and introduce himself to his "guests" should remind you his appearance in the classic Terence Fisher's Dracula!), (2) the movie is a good representative of the Italian gothic cinema from the 1960's, (3) the story offers a variation in the theme about a mad scientist and the living dead, and (4) is a must have for terror collectionists of these era. Note, however that this Sinister Cinema release is a burned copy, may be from some VHS material. The transfer is ok (the audio is a bit more dissapointing) and good enough until a more professional release is available. Good for the price.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Chip Kaufmann on September 24, 2009
Format: DVD
For my next Christopher Lee Euroshock review, I'll start at the beginning. CASTLE OF THE LIVING DEAD was the first of his "European vacation" movies that I had ever come across. I saw it in a drive-in back in the late 60s along with several other "dubbed horrors" as we called them. I remembered it because unlike most of the other movies that were featured, this one was in black and white and it was genuinely odd. It isn't a true horror film but more of a Gothic mystery with elements of the grotesque included. There are a few murders but no gore, a truly creepy servant (Europeans LOVE creepy servants), and a restrained but effective performance from Lee as a Count who can instantly embalm animals (and people). The remarkable menagerie that inhabit his castle is truly effective.

Set in the late 18th century, this 1964 movie was shot on location at a castle in Bomarzo, Italy with large grotesque stone creatures on the grounds that the filmmakers took good advantage of. The music is effective and in its original aspect ratio the photography was quite striking (more about that later). Low budget to be sure but producer Paul Maslansky makes the most of it. CASTLE has gained latter day notoriety because it marks the debut of actor Donald Sutherland playing two roles (a soldier and a witch!). In gratitude Sutherland named his son Kiefer after the film's director (Warren Kiefer). It also is noteworthy for employing second unit director Michael Reeves (WITCHFINDER GENERAL) who appears briefly with his girlfriend as part of the Count's collection.

A word or two about this DVD transfer. Sinister Cinema is to be commended for making this rare title available to the public.
Read more ›
5 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Annie Van Auken TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on May 1, 2009
Format: DVD
First a word about privately manufactured DVDs--

Often, these transfers are of a quality similar to budget box brands. The films themselves are unrestored and rarely pristine yet still watchable (unless there's an inordinate number of repaired breaks). Extras are non-existent and inclusion of artwork or liner notes varies by manufacturer. These niche companies provide a valuable outlet for movies absolutely unavailable anywhere else, plus their prices are often reasonable.

SINISTER CINEMA's dub of the slow-moving Euro-made CASTLE OF THE LIVING DEAD is typically average. In Canadian Donald Sutherland's big screen debut he plays two roles (Sgt. Paul and the witch), plus he cameos as an audience member. Chris Lee is in top form as the demented Count Drago.

FILM SYNOPSIS--
An atmospheric Gothic piece set in early 18th Century Europe. The count's strange old castle is visited by an invited performance group. Soon the actors begin dying and an ugly old witch (Sutherland) says these deaths are caused by a curse, but we know better! Count Drago is both a taxidermist and a bit of a tinkerer-- he's created a process that instantly embalms the living, and he just loves adding to his strange little menagerie of stuffed critters.

When not stumbling down ill-lit corridors with some unfortunate victim, watch for the heroic dwarf and his gigantic deaf-mute sidekick.

Related item:
Christopher Lee's next movie project after "Castle" was THE GORGON (1964). This is available on the twin-DVD set ICONS OF HORROR: HAMMER FILMS along with "The Two Faces of Dr. Jekyll" (1960), "Scream of Fear" (1961) and "The Curse of the Mummy's Tomb" (1964).
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By H. Pack on November 1, 2013
Format: Amazon Instant Video Verified Purchase
This Italian-French co-production falls into the so-bad-it's good category. It stars Christopher Lee (as Count Drago) and was Donald Sutherland’s first feature. The Canadian actor has a triple role!
The co-director and co-scriptwriter was Warren Kiefer. (Yes, Kiefer Sutherland was named after him.)
Circa 1815 in Italy, a troupe of five traveling players is commissioned for a private performance at “scientist” Drago’s castle, where they are shocked to discover an incredible petrified world.
Sutherland is credited in IMDb as “Sgt. Paul / The witch / The old man.” Paul is a dimwitted provincial police officer, and Sutherland’s own voice is overdubbed. Of course, for the witch role, he cross-dresses and wears the requisite false nose and warts. A woman’s voice is overdubbed, and her lines are entirely in rhyme. But who is “the old man”? The only point where I can figure that Sutherland could be in this role is at the very beginning, where he may be briefly playing a highwayman, with his back to the camera, in a long shot. (Of course, some scenes may be missing from the version I watched on Amazon Instant Video.)
Lee, wearing what may be the shabbiest-looking makeup of his entire career, also overdubbed his own voice. His reading of the biblical funeral liturgy at one point is, to say the least, eye-popping.
Actors Philippe Leroy and Luciano Pigozzi are also familiar faces. The latter will at least be recognizable to genre fans.
Another among three co-directors was Michael Reeves, who -- before dying of a barbiturate O.D. at age 25 -- also helmed She-Beast, The Sorcerers, and his masterpiece, The Conqueror Worm.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews