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Cat on a Hot Tin Roof. Paperback


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 72 pages
  • Publisher: Dramatists Play Service, Inc.; Reprint. edition (October 1, 1958)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0822201895
  • ISBN-13: 978-0822201892
  • Product Dimensions: 7.5 x 5.2 x 0.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.5 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (67 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #490,868 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Grade 10-Up Topics covered in 10 authoritative essays include: the character of Brick, his friendship with Skipper, his relationship with Maggie, homophobia, the author's unseen characters, Williams's treatment of women, the influence of Spanish author Federico Garc'a Lorca, and comparisons to Williams's other works. All chapters contain examples of dialogue from the play followed by interpretation. The book also has a chronology of the playwright's life and a substantial bibliography. Students studying Williams's work will find a wealth of information here. A great purchase for schools with Cat in the curriculum. -Pat Bender, The Shipley School, Bryn Mawr, PA
Copyright 2002 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

Play by Tennessee Williams, published and produced in 1955. It won a Pulitzer Prize. The play exposes the emotional lies governing relationships in the family of a wealthy Southern planter of humble origins. The patriarch, Big Daddy, is about to celebrate his 65th birthday. His two married sons, Gooper (Brother Man) and Brick, have returned for the occasion, the former with his pregnant wife and five children, the latter with his wife Margaret (Maggie). The interactions between Big Daddy, Brick, and Maggie form the substance of the play. -- The Merriam-Webster Encyclopedia of Literature --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

I received it in the mail very quickly and it was cheap.
Victor D. Agama
I read both versions of the play: Tennessee William's and those with the director's judgments included and felt I liked TW's version better.
Ted d'Afflisio
Overall, it was a good, quick read recommended to anyone who doesn't mind feeling a little sad at the end of a book.
mjcast

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

25 of 28 people found the following review helpful By ejordan1@dixie-net.com on December 21, 1998
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Tennessee Williams's Pulitzer Prize winning play "Cat on a Hot Tin Roof" is a reverie filled drama of lust, greed, and death that puts emphasis on the interaction of families. Williams creates universal characters that are pathetic yet familiar and therefore warrant the reader's sympathy. He writes with such deceptive simplicity that he masks his characters's inner turmoil initially, making the turnout of such characterizations intriguing. The play presents that humanity isn't beautiful while attempting to shed light on the emotional lies that govern the interaction of families. "Cat on a Hot Tin Roof"'s intertwining themes of the lie of life and the deception of death provide the reader with insight towards the amblivalence of life.
To say so much within such a short piece is a mystery within itself. The sheer power of the plot is testimony of Williams's genius. The play is beautifully constructed and hits upon many themes and emotions with clarity and precision, making it an enjoyable read while having substance. I did an analysis of this book for my junior Reading class, and recommend the read to anyone seeking high drama and a well rounded take on death.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By B. Wilfong on October 25, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is a superbly written play about that most basic of human issues, the desire to communicate honestly and openly with someone that you care about. At its core, Tennessee Williams' masterpiece is really about nothing more than that. Everyone wants and needs someone to listen to, and accept, you.
All of Williams' plays are about lonely people when you come right down to it. However, "Cat on a Hot Tin Roof" is unique in that these lonely characters are part of a large family, and at times are literally tripping over each other. What makes us lonely is our inability to communicate with those that we love. It is in that essential human drive that Williams creates the tragedy of this piece. A father knows his son is a closeted gay man; he loves him, but can't get the son to believe or accept that. A wife knows the truth about her husband, but can't make herself believe it. (Actually that last one applies to two wives in the play, for different reasons.) A man faces death, in essence alone, because he can't admit how terrified he is. And the list goes on. These are the stories of the Pollitt family of the Mississippi Delta. Those particulars are different for all of us, but the essential worries and fears of the members of this family are universal, and have been at the heart of a powerful drama for over 50 years.
The witting of this play is luminous and gorgeous. In fact, at times it reads like poetry. However, the power in this piece is also due in large part to the structure of this three act play. The first act is almost a solo from the character of Maggie. The second act is a painful and terrifying duet from the characters of Brick and Big Daddy, and the final act is the ensemble number that builds, and then ends on a slow drawn out note.
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19 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Michael J. Mazza HALL OF FAME on November 2, 2001
Format: Mass Market Paperback
"Cat on a Hot Tin Roof" is another masterpiece by Tennessee Williams, who was truly one of the 20th century's greatest playwrights. This play was presented in New York in the 1950s, and in book form it is an excellent read.
I haven't looked at other editions, but the Signet edition contains two different versions of Act 3, along with a note by Williams explaining how director Elia Kazan persuaded him to write a second version. This feature makes the book particularly useful for teachers and students.
"Cat" takes place on a Southern plantation, and deals with a wealthy, but very dysfunctional family. Williams creates stunning dialogue for his characters: Brick, the bitter, alcoholic ex-athlete; Brick's frustrated wife Margaret; "Big Daddy," the patriarch, who is dying of cancer; and the rest. Williams also establishes the plantation's original owners as a haunting presence through the lines of his characters.
"Cat" is an explosive family drama about greed, secrets, guilt, alcoholism, and sexual frustration. Williams' characters are larger-than-life, and even grotesque, but Williams never loses a grasp on their essential humanity. An important book for those with a serious interest in American drama.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 21, 1999
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Cat on a Hot Tin Roof swelters with the fire of longing for that wispy shade of happiness. The fierce currents of discontent, jealousy, and mendacity surge through this piece, leaving the reader to fend for himself on an emotional and gripping roller coaster. The struggle between Maggie the Cat and her husband Brick is the universal struggle to love and be loved through the deceptions and misconceptions that can wreck a chance at happiness. The external struggles mirror the internal struggles, for each character seems to be battling despair and a sense of worthlessness. All in all a superb read.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By L. Baghetti on September 30, 2004
Format: Mass Market Paperback
When I read this play, I was a little shocked; nothing I had read about this play prepared me for what I was about to read. What startled me the most is its bluntness. But after reflecting, I decided it is a well-written play and it wouldn't have the same effect if it were written any other way. "Cat on a Hot Tin Roof" covers a lot of territory in just 173 pages. Homosexuality, alcoholism, dealing with problems, death, and relationships between husband and wife, family, and friends are just a few to mention. Each is covered in depth, but use few words to describe it. Tennessee Williams never states the facts; he leaves it to us to figure out what the characters are saying and the meaning behind it. With just six main characters, Williams discretely has them deal with their problems in their own way, by facing the facts, ignoring the problem, denial, or drinking the problem away. Williams paints a clear picture of each character's physical features, but more significant, personality and beliefs. It is interesting to see how the themes in "Cat on a Hot Tin Roof" are viewed in today's society compared to when the play was first produced in 1955, nearly fifty years ago.
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