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Cat and Mouse Hardcover – Bargain Price, May 15, 2007

36 customer reviews

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Hardcover, Bargain Price, May 15, 2007
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Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

This pulse-pounding military thriller from bestseller Coyle (They Are Soldiers) depicts the U.S.'s current war against terrorism from the rare perspective of a small unit battling an elusive enemy. Army Ranger Capt. Nathan Dixon and his men are chomping at the bit to be dispatched to the Philippines to track down Hamdani Summirat, a charismatic Indonesian soldier and strategic mastermind turned jihadist behind a plot to found a pan-Islamic republic in Southeast Asia. But what happens when the biggest adversary is your own battalion commander? Egomaniacal Lt. Col. Robert Delmont sees the looming crisis as the ultimate springboard for his career and, regardless of the mounting body count, he's hell-bent on being perceived as the heroic leader, even if his inept tactics are putting his charges in mortal danger. Forced to take matters into his own hands, Dixon improvises with action-packed results. While the characterization isn't exactly deep, Coyle's masterfully labyrinthine plot lines, pedal-to-the-metal pacing and brutally realistic portrayal of army life make this another winner. (May)
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Review

"Harold Coyle is the best natural storyteller I know."--Tom Clancy

"Coyle is best when he's depicting soldiers facing death . . . He knows soldiers and and he understands the brotherhood of arms mystique and transcends national boundaries."--The New York Times

"A superbly talented storyteller . . . the Tom Clancy of ground warfare."--W.E.B. Griffin

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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 384 pages
  • Publisher: Forge Books; 1st edition (May 15, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0765305488
  • ASIN: B00403NGIQ
  • Product Dimensions: 6.1 x 1.2 x 9.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 2.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (36 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,927,774 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By T. Sobczak on August 1, 2007
Format: Hardcover
I wanted a good Coyle book and was sorely disappointed. I expect better from Harold Coyle, but my nits may not be his fault except for the big long build-up to a quick short battle. It seems this story was thrown together to make a comment on the current Iraq situation (as well as army careerists, liberals, "real" soldiers, etc.) and then was passed to an editor whose first language isn't English. Or worse, run through some inane software program. Wrong words are used (phantom for fathom, winched for winced, etc.) throughout, sentences run on forever and the lack of proper punctuation, especially commas, will have you re-reading sentences to make sense of them. The errors truly detract from what could have been a good summer read.

I can only assume Tor-Forge/Tom Doherty Associates Books tossed this one out quickly for the money. The lack of effort shows in the little quality contained therein.

If you're a fan, add a star. If not, your reading experience may be truly disappointing. I hope Coyle forces the publisher to do better next time.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By George Powell on November 26, 2007
Format: Hardcover
One of the reviews below says exactly what I was going to say. I have always enjoyed Harold Coyle's books, particularly "The Ten Thousand", an excellent retelling of Xenophon's "The Anabasis." This one, however, was a deep disappointment.

The story is a pretty good one, but having to wade through the miserably edited text killed it for me. I started bookmarking every elementary grammar, syntax, and word choice mistake, just to see how many there would be. There were a lot.

I cringed every time I saw the word "absconded" used for "ensconsced." And referring to a unit of Rangers as a "caulk" instead of the proper term "chalk" or the caliber of a weapon fired by an American character as 7.62mm (the AK is 7.62mm, the M-16 is 5.56mm) are mistakes someone of Coyle's experience should never make. When you write military thrillers, the military details better be correct, or the reader will suspend belief quickly.

It appeared to me that the editing of this book was outsourced to Bombay. And please, for God's sake, whoever edited this book should learn to use some commas! I had to read some of the sentences multiple times to divine the intended meaning.

This terrible example reflects badly on Coyle's previous excellent work.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Michael St James on January 16, 2009
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I haven't read Coyle for a few years. I wish I hadn't decided to revisit via this miserable example of military fiction. Others have said it: the editing is pathetic. This book reeks of disdain for fans of the genre. This book reminds me why I decided several years ago to move on to something else. In addition to the sixth-grade editing, the substance of the book is weak. The author dallies through 7/10ths of the book describing in detail how marionettes wreak havoc in our military services, then rushes through the climactic battle in a few pages. Weak, unsatisfying, insulting.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Eugene J. Walden on April 12, 2010
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Coyle usually writes well constructed, clear, concise novels. In this presentation, "Cat and Mouse", such is not the case. His twists and turns make the book interesting although he seems to end his story rather abruptly.

The battle scene leaves much to be desired after such a long and interesting introduction. Word usage is a problem in a nunmber of instances and causes one to stop and try to reconcile what has just been read. In short, the whole plot in not truly reflective of Coyles' ability as a novelist and storyteller.

E.J. Walden, author of "Operation Snow Owl"
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By george sandbar on September 25, 2010
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Just go ahead and skip this one. It's terrible. Reading this book gave me the sense of going to see an awful movie. You feel like getting up and leaving but decide not to because you have already paid and keep hoping that something interesting will happen. Regrettably, nothing interesting ever happens. I had to force myself to finnish the damn thing. Everyone else has said it, the editing is atrocious. Aside from that, the story sounds as if it were construed by a book writing machine...or a precocious 7 year old. I do not suggest reading this book.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By BWC on February 28, 2012
Format: Hardcover
First, I should admit that I really enjoyed Coyle's "The Ten Thousand," although I haven't read it since I was a teenager. That being the case, I was pretty surprised to find this book so awful.

I won't even address the glaring cases of poor grammar or inappropriate words since other reviews have beaten that topic to death. What I will say is that this book was written by someone who apparently knows very little about the military or the Republic of the Philippines. I understand that this is a fictional novel, but if other readers of military fiction are like me, they place a high importance on getting some of the details right and at least making the story plausible. It's hard to enjoy a book when you find so much of the details are flat out preposterous.

1. There are not a whole lot of Abu Sayyaf Group running around anymore and they stepped away from religious fundamentalism and became more of a criminal gang long ago.

2. ASG is a homegrown Filipino organization and while they do collaborate with other groups in the region, having a non-Filipino as their commander is unlikely.

3. ASG uses primarily US weapons, not AK-47s.

4. Apparently Coyle thinks that OPLANS are drawn up by Lieutenant Colonels in line units and the Geographic Combatant Commander is not involved in the process.

5. Coyle thinks that a Ranger Battalion is tasked by big army and not USSOCOM.

6. Apparenly Coyle thinks that a SAW is a crew-served weapon.

7. Why would the Task Force use an airstrip on the complete opposite side of Mindanao as their Aerial Port of Debarkation when there's an airport in Zamboanga that can handle C-17s and another in Cotabato that can handle them as long as they're lightly loaded on the flight out.
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