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Texas Women on the Cattle Trails (Sam Rayburn Series on Rural Life, sponsored by Texas A&M University-Commerce) Hardcover – August 9, 2006


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Product Details

  • Series: Sam Rayburn Series on Rural Life, sponsored by Texas A&M University-Commerce (Book 13)
  • Hardcover: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Texas A&M University Press; annotated edition edition (August 9, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1585445436
  • ISBN-13: 978-1585445431
  • Product Dimensions: 9.4 x 6.4 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,693,155 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"It is a must for anyone who wants to understand life on the trail as it really was." -- Sylvia Gann Mahoney, author College Rodeo: From Show to Sport

". . . brings together a previously scattered wealth of information into one book." -- Southwestern Historical Quarterly, Fall 2007

". . . what separates this book from other publications is that it offers specific names, faces, and stories of an assortment of women who took to the Texas cattle trails between 1868 and 1889." -- East Texas Historical Association, Summer 2007

From the Publisher

Featured in the Texas Book Club on Southern Living's website: southernliving.com/ilovetexas

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Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Cindy W. Bonner on June 22, 2007
Format: Hardcover
Almost everyone has heard of Annie Oakley, Belle Starr, and Calamity Jane. But how about Kate Medlin, Hattie Cluck, Margaret Borland or Cornelia Adair? These are just four of the sixteen fearless women featured in "TEXAS WOMAN ON THE CATTLE TRAILS," a compendium of short biographies written by sixteen Texas writers, and edited by Austwell resident Sara R. Massey.

Some of the featured women were young newlyweds when they went up the trail. Others were middle-aged mothers, and one was pregnant. They were widows, business women, heiresses. Some were cultured and educated. Almost all encountered Indians, bandits or rustlers. They endured blizzards, floods, stampedes, disease, death. They made deals with cattle buyers and sellers. They witnessed a new country in its earliest growing pains, and most lived to tell their tales, even to embellish them over time.

Take Minta Corum Holmsley of Comanche, Texas, who rode her horse up the trail sidesaddle, she said, "because we didn't have better sense." On that drive she claimed to have met John Wesley Hardin masquerading as an Indian, and later to have encountered a hundred Sioux who had fought Custer at the Battle of Little Bighorn. She managed to save her favorite cow pony by screaming in one Indian's face until he let go and fled in fright.

Another woman, the widowed Margaret Heffernon Borland of Victoria lost four of her seven children to one epidemic of Yellow Fever. And Margaret herself died at the end of her own cattle drive in 1873. The Wichita, Kansas newspaper announced her death on July 5, at the age of 49, as having been caused by "mania, super-induced by her long, tedious journey and over-taxation of the brain." Her nephew had her body shipped back to Victoria and she is buried in the Evergreen Cemetery.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Michele J. Samuelson on August 17, 2007
Format: Hardcover
It's a tall order, because there are so many good books on Texas history, but Sara Massey's book really shines. I've always been a sucker for cattle trail tails, and I was deep into Haley's book on Charles Goodnight when I went down to Gonzales for a book fair and signing. I missed the author, but picked up Texas Women on the Cattle Trails anyway. From the moment I started reading, I couldn't put it down!

The information gathered is well-researched and each of the stories entertainingly written. I very much appreciated information, where available, on burial sites and original homesites - thanks to this book, I was able to find Harriet Cluck's gravesite in Cedar Park, making an educational reading experience a personally affecting one as well. I learned a great deal more about the town just by reading this book.

This oughta be on the required reading lists in Texas history courses at universities (wouldn't hurt for women's studies majors to read it as well). Texas Women on the Cattle Trails provides provocative and enlightening information on a well-canvassed but rarely understood portion of Texas history.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Dennis Mccown on March 29, 2007
Format: Hardcover
There's enough excitement and derring-do in J. Marvin Hunter's "Trail Drivers of Texas" for anyone interested in the Old West, but out of curiousity, I picked up a new book on the cattle drives, "Texas Women on the Cattle Trails."

To my pleasant surprise, the book was every bit as good as Hunter's great classic. Edited by Sara R. Massey, this new volume features the stories of sixteen remarkable women who either accompanied their husbands up the trail or managed herds on their own. Facing the same hazards as the men, these women rode astride or sidesaddle, drove buggies or wagons, and endured thirst, danger, storm, and stampedes. None of these women were common people; all exhibited above-average ambition and courage. Most went on to lead successful lives, but their stories, ably told by eighteen knowledgeable contributors, are not altogether happy ones. Even so, the book is interesting, thrilling, and inspiring. A good addition to anyone's Old West collection.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book is a great source for information on women who were involved in the cattle business, either personally or because of their families or husbands. An eye opening revelation of the experiences of women in a virtual man's world, this book should be included in any library of western histories.
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