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Celebrating Your New Jewish Daughter: Creating Jewish Ways to Welcome Baby Girls into the Covenant Paperback – January 1, 2001

ISBN-13: 978-1580230902 ISBN-10: 1580230903 Edition: 1st

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Celebrating Your New Jewish Daughter: Creating Jewish Ways to Welcome Baby Girls into the Covenant + New Jewish Baby Book: Names, Ceremonies & Customs - A Guide for Today's Families + How to Raise a Jewish Child: A Practical Handbook for Family Life
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Jewish Lights; 1 edition (January 1, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1580230903
  • ISBN-13: 978-1580230902
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.6 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,076,883 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

While the brit milah (circumcision) ceremony welcomes baby boys into the Jewish community, no similar standard celebration exists for baby girls. Cohen, a journalist, introduces and collects welcoming ceremonies that have been invented over the past 30 years, unearthed from Jewish communities around the world and adapted from other rituals. The challenge of the simchat bat (celebration of a daughter), she says, is that its innovative nature "extends to each of us the opportunity to compose the ceremony that feels best suited to our family's needs." To guide parents, grandparents, rabbis and cantors, Cohen has compiled an array of prayers, readings, blessings, songs and rituals that concretize the child's entry into the community. Hebrew texts are accompanied by translations and transliterations. Complete sample ceremonies include Sephardic, Orthodox, humanist and a "modern mikvah ceremony" in which the child is immersed in a vessel representing the traditional ritual bath. The ceremonies that work best, Cohen notes, are rooted in modern poems and songs as well as classical elements of Jewish liturgy. This resource will guide families at one of the most joyous moments of their lives.

Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

Review

While the brit milah {circumcision)welcomes baby boys into the Jewish community, no similar standard celebration exists for baby girls. Cohen,a journalist, introduces and collects welcoming ceremonies that have been invented over the past 30 years, unearthed from Jewish commuunities around the world and adapted from other rituals. An array of prayers, readings, blessings, songsand rituals as well as several complete sample ceremonies, that concretize the childs entry into the community are included.Hebrew texts are accompanied by translations and transliterations.

(Your Child Magazine 2006-04-01)

"All the historical, spiritual and practical levels you need…. An excellent resource for those seeking creative yet traditional ways to include girls and women into the rich tapestry of Jewish lifecycle events."
Rabbi Elyse Goldstein, author of ReVisions: Seeing Torah through a Feminist Lens, and editor of The Women's Torah Commentaryand The Women’s Haftarah Commentary

“A fine resource for clergy and parents alike. A rich selection of readings and blessings is complemented by an intriguing description of naming ceremonies in the Jewish tradition.”
Cantor Erica Jan Lippitz, Oheb Shalom Congregation, South Orange, New Jersey

“A comprehensive compendium.... With exquisite sensitivity to Jewish ethnic, religious, and familial diversity, Nussbaum Cohen offers a great birth present for parents and girls and a must for every rabbi’s study, synagogue gift shop, or day school library.”
Letty Cottin Pogrebin, author of Deborah, Golda, and Me: Being Female and Jewish in America


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Customer Reviews

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It will be a welcome addition to your Jewish bookshelf and your life.
Larry Mark MyJewishBooksDotCom
This book goes a long way to giving the reader many ideas that are delightful and inspiring without being 'new-agey'or 'preachy'.
Robb
This book is a great resource for planning the naming ceremony of your new daughter (or grand daughter).
M. Rabin

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Larry Mark MyJewishBooksDotCom on April 26, 2001
Format: Paperback
The introduction opens with, "Mazal Tov, You've Had a Baby Girl!" Everybody is familiar with a bris, or brit milah circumcision ceremony -- and in current practice, a festive celebration, for healthy baby boys on their eighth day after birth. But what do you do when you have a daughter? What are they, chopped liver? Since the early 1970's, some Jewish parents have been celebrating their daughters in original ways (Ezrat Nashim published the first ceremonies in 1977, and the havurah and renewal movements wrote about theirs starting around 1973). Debra Nussbaum Cohen, a resident of Park Slope Brooklyn, and mother who has known the joy of birth and the pain of loss, has created this essential guide to new and traditional ceremonies with which to welcome your new daughter to the world, the covenant, and the Jewish people. It will be a welcome addition to your Jewish bookshelf and your life. Consider this: what you create today will be a "tradition" for your descendants! Cohen started collecting organic Simchat Bat ceremonies when she was pregnant with her first child. For your Simchat Bat ceremony and celebration, she includes readings, poems, specialized readings for adoptions, blessings, prayers (in Hebrew, English transliterations and translations), history, songs, and rituals. It is an inclusive book that has sample ceremonies also crafted for adherents to traditional Orthodoxy, traditional Sephardic rite, contemporary rites, contemporary Orthodox, humanism, and modren mikveh rites. Part One consists of about two dozen pages that introduce you to welcoming ceremonies and Jewish tradition, including the idea of covenant, brit milah, the custom of gomel, and that of a new father being called to the Torah to recite blessings, announce the birth, and pray for his wife's recovery.Read more ›
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By bklyn reader on April 12, 2001
Format: Paperback
Finally, a book for aware Jewish families looking for a formal ceremony to welcome their daughtersinto the Jewish people. For centuries, baby boys were celebrated in Brit Milah, while girls were named quietly, in shul. Today, many families seek to honor their new daughters and our shared tradition in a baby-naming ceremony. Nussbaum Cohen's substantial contribution to the process is the wide range of resources she presents, as the reader is guided by her elegant prose through the full breadth of options. Sample ceremonies allow families to pick and choose the one that best suits their needs -- or craft their own, from the excellent 'building blocks' Nussbaum Cohen provides. Well-researched and well-written, a perfect new baby gift or addition to a family library.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Nathaniel R. Lamkin on August 23, 2008
Format: Paperback
There are few truly essential books for new Jewish parents; if you are blessed with a daughter then Cohen's book is surely one of them. It is at its core an indispensable how-to guide for planning a beautiful Simchat Brit Bat ceremony step by step. But it is also so much more. It places the texts and rituals in their liturgical context and helps the reader to understand why each selection is relevant. Cohen has also written a wondrously inclusive book that caters to a broad spectrum of Jewish practices from traditional to progressive. My wife and I used this book and little else to plan a lovely, meaningful ceremony for our daughter. We've never owned a book that was so quickly dog-eared and full of notes than Cohen's masterpiece. It is an extraordinary work.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Robb on April 17, 2001
Format: Paperback
I initially bought this book for friends with a newborn daughter. However, on the long flight home I began to read it for myself and was instantly taken in by the well-constructed and detailed case the author brings forth. The celebration of birth is a magnificent and unique experiece and should be shared by all in a special way regrdless of the child's gender. This book goes a long way to giving the reader many ideas that are delightful and inspiring without being 'new-agey'or 'preachy'. I highly recommend this read to anyone who has a baby daughter, baby boy, or no baby at all. This is an essential read for exploring modern ideas in traditional ceremony.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Mountain Artist on February 24, 2006
Format: Paperback
This book was great for helping us plan our Bat Simcha. We purchased it even before our baby was born - before we knew the baby would be a girl. It provided many great ideas for creating either a Bat Simcha or a more personalized bris. We could not have planned such a meaningful ceremony without the help of this book.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By mcmcph on March 12, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I found this book incredibly helpful in putting together a baby naming celebration for our daughter. I was able to really personalize the ceremony with text that I found applicable to our family, and share those with the Rabbi to make for a memorable day.
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