Currently unavailable.
We don't know when or if this item will be back in stock.

Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Color:
  • Celestron Firstscope 70EQ 70mm Refractor Telescope
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
  • To view this video download Flash Player
      

Celestron Firstscope 70EQ 70mm Refractor Telescope


Currently unavailable.
We don't know when or if this item will be back in stock.
  • 2 eyepieces (45x and 90x)
  • German equatorial, CG-2 mount
  • Star Pointer finder scope
  • Slow-motion controls and setting circles
  • f13 focal ratio
Currently unavailable. We don't know when or if this item will be back in stock.

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Unlimited Cloud Storage: Never run out of space for all your photos, videos, and files with unlimited storage plans from Amazon Cloud Drive. Try either plan for 3-months free. Learn more

Technical Details


Product Details

Product Manual [749kb PDF]
  • Shipping Weight: 18 pounds
  • Shipping: Currently, item can be shipped only within the U.S.
  • ASIN: B000051TMZ
  • Item model number: 21076
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #44,384 in Camera & Photo (See Top 100 in Camera & Photo)
  • Product Warranty: For warranty information about this product, please click here
  • Date first available at Amazon.com: September 17, 2002

Product Description

Amazon.com

FirstScope 70 models are powerful optical instruments that have 100 times the light gathering ability of the naked eye. This ability allows the FirstScope 70 to deliver images 37% brighter than those produced by a 60mm refractor telescope. The objective lens is designed to yield the finest images available in this class of optical instrument. The accessories are all made of glass with metal construction, to ensure good image quality. These telescopes have all glass components, coated optics and smooth functioning mounts, with the added benefit of slow motion controls on the mount for easy adjustments. The FirstScope 70 telescope tubes are glossy black aluminum.

    This is a refractor telescope. Refractors (also known as a dioptrics) capture light with a lens at the front of a long tube and send it to an eyepiece at the other end. They look, in other words, just like what most people think of when they hear the word "telescope."
    Refractors offer--potentially, at least--the cleanest images of any telescope design. They are simple and reliable (the sealed tube is maintenance-free), and are good for both celestial and terrestrial viewing.
   
  • Read more about different telescope designs in our buying guide
  • The German equatorial mount features setting circles and slow motion controls on the R.A. and DEC axes. These controls will enhance your viewing experience by simplifying both locating and tracking objects. When you're looking for a telescope offering a bit more versatility and control than the altazimuth models, these are the telescopes to consider. These telescopes yield breathtaking views of the moon, Saturn with its ring structure, Jupiter and its belts, and hundreds of deep-sky objects including: galaxies, nebulae and star clusters. Add an optional solar filter and you can observe activity on the sun.

    The FirstScope 70EQ Specifications:

    • 70mm (2.8") Aperture
    • 900mm Focal Length, f/13
    • Equatorial Mount with Setting Circles and Slow Motion Adjustment Cables
    • Sturdy Adjustable Aluminum Tripod with Accessory Tray
    • Telescope Weight: 17 lb.
    The FirstScope 70EQ Standard Accessories:
    • 1-1/4" 20mm (45x), 10mm (90x) Eyepieces
    • 90° Star Diagonal – 1-1/4"
    • Star Pointer Finderscope
    • Equatorial Mount
    • The Sky L1 CD ROM

    Moon Viewing 101
    The moon is often one of the first celestial objects a beginner will look at through his or her telescope. Here are a couple hints for you once you get your hands on your new FirstScope 70.

    Often, it is tempting to look at the Moon when it is full. At this time, the face we see is fully illuminated and its light can be overpowering. In addition, little or no contrast can be seen during this phase. One of the best times to observe the Moon is during its partial phases (around the time of first or third quarter). Long shadows reveal a great amount of detail on the lunar surface. At low power you will be able to see most of the lunar disk at one time. The optional Reducer/Corrector lens allows for breath-taking views of the entire lunar disk when used with a low power eyepiece. Change to higher power (magnification) to focus in on a smaller area. Choose the lunar tracking rate from the NexStar's MENU tracking rate options to keep the moon centered in the eyepiece even at high magnifications.

    Observing the Planets
    Other easy targets include the five "naked eye" planets of our solar system, so called because they can be spotted in the night sky by the unaided eye. You can see Venus go through its lunar-like phases. Mars can reveal a host of surface detail and one, if not both, of its polar caps. You’ll be able to see the cloud belts of Jupiter, perhaps even the great Red Spot. In addition, you’ll be able to see the moons of Jupiter as they orbit the giant planet. Saturn, with its beautiful rings, is easily visible at moderate power, as is Mercury. All you need to know is where to look. Most astronomy publications indicate where the planets are in the sky each month.

    From the Manufacturer

    Firstscope 70 models are powerful optical instruments that have 100 times the light gathering ability of the naked eye. This ability allows the Firstscope 70 to deliver images 37 percent brighter than those produced by a 60mm refractor telescope. The objective lens is designed to yield the finest images available in this class of optical instrument. The optical tubes are glossy black aluminum and the accessories are all made of glass, with metal construction, to ensure good image quality. The German equatorial mount features setting circles and slow-motion controls on the R.A. and DEC axes. These controls will enhance your viewing experience by simplifying both locating and tracking objects.

    When used for astronomical viewing, these telescopes yield breathtaking views of the moon, Saturn with its ring structure, Jupiter and its belts, and hundreds of deep-sky objects, including nebulae and star clusters. Add an optional solar filter and you can observe activity on the sun. For terrestrial use, you can enjoy views from your own backyard or take your telescope out in the field to experience the natural environment, up close.


    Customer Questions & Answers

    Customer Reviews

    4.0 out of 5 stars
    Share your thoughts with other customers

    Most Helpful Customer Reviews

    91 of 93 people found the following review helpful By Michael J. Wood VINE VOICE on June 1, 2001
    This is a good starter scope for some people, most notably those who don't know if they want to spend more than $500 to buy a better starter scope, and don't mind spending more later if they enjoy the hobby. I own a few scopes, and have used dozens, so I had an idea of what I was getting with my money. This scope will let you have fair views of Jupiter including the moons and the two equatorial belts, nice views of Saturn, although the Cassini division isn't clear, spectacular views of the moon, and not too bad views of Venus and Mars, given the size of the scope. Deep space objects will take a lot of time and patience to appriciate them. Make no mistake, these will not be great views compared to Hubble, but if you could get great views with a $200 telescope on the ground, why would you spend millions to put a telescope in space. You get what you pay for.
    And you'll need to pay for more. You'll want at a minimum one or two additional eyepieces (I never use the high power eyepiece that it came with, as it's a piece of junk), a moon filter, maybe a couple of colored filters. I also have an external motor and some astrophotography supplies, but note that this scope is not recommended for astrophotography. Of course, if you like spending dozens of hours taking three rolls of film for 2-5 decent (but not spectacular) photos, go right ahead, but there are much better scopes on the market for that part of the hobby. The equatorial mount is also difficult for many folks to work with, but if you plan on putting a motor on the scope it is essential. Best use of this scope for me is setting it out on the front drive, put Jupiter or Saturn in the view, turn the motor on, and let the neighbors come round and learn a little astronomy.
    Overall, a great scope for under $300, but know what you're buying and realize this isn't the greatest scope out there. Still, it's a dandy scope!
    Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
    Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
    Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
    36 of 36 people found the following review helpful By "fullb" on December 17, 2002
    After looking at the night sky with binoculars all these years I decided to get my first telescope.WOW ! I was amazed at what I can see with this celestron firstscope 70 EQ !! Iv been looking at the rings of Saturn !!(which are at their peak viewing this year and next),the moons of Jupiter where I can also see some of the bands on Jupiter.And the moon is a grand site with this scope also.It very easy to use once you get it put together. I had to have my son help me put it together. The Star Pointer finder scope makes it easy to locate what your looking for. I would recomend this scope to any first time users.
    I also like the fact that you can buy other eyepeices and filters for this scope.
    Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
    Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
    Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
    34 of 35 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 27, 2003
    When this scope first arrived I was very pleased. It looked great and I couldn't wait to try it. I immediatly began setting it up, which was a difficult task. The instructions gave a photo that had tiny arrows pointing to different parts of the scope. [I still can't figure out what angle their photo was taken from.] The directions started out easy to follow, but later on it seemed that their writer had taken them from a guide-book on flowers found in the Sahara. I'm 14 though, and even I managed to use common sense to put the scope together.[It doesn't hurt to have a couple of magazines handy, such as Sky and Telescope or Astronomy.]
    After setting the scope up and fingering with the controls while the sun went down I eagerly set it up outside. I live out in the country so I didn't have to worry about street lights, and using the finderscope attachment I easily located Jupiter. Bringing it into focus, I was able to easily see 7 of its moons. From that point I have steadily grown more accustomed to the controls, and for the cost I paid this scope has turned out to be wonderful!
    Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
    Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
    Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
    21 of 21 people found the following review helpful By kone TOP 500 REVIEWER on August 18, 2005
    Celestron's 70 mm (2.75 inches)is the most basic beginning telescope one can buy. Here's why:

    1. The objective (front lens) diameter is not the smallest out there, but pretty close. It will give decent views of he moon and very small images of the planets. Deep sky objects will appear fuzzy and dim.

    2. The two eyepieces are appropriate for the size of the objective. Too many scopes advertize their extreme powers and in most cases the image is so poor the higher powers are completely useless. In this case, Celestron is not pushing magnification, which is good. However the highest power that should be used with a scope this size is about 140 power, which under ideal viewing conditions gives good views of the moon and planets.

    3. The mount is not heavy enough to give the scope stability, so there will be lots of vibration in the scope whenever it is touched. Yet, for the price of this scope, one cannot expect much more.

    For a 10-12 year old this is a pretty good starter scope. For an adult, I cannot recommend it. It is too small and has too many limitations. One quickly grows out of this scope.

    Jim "Konedog" Koenig, Astronomy Buff
    Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
    Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
    Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again